Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Attached is my oil analysis report for my 2000 Tundra that I bought new in April '2000. The report shows two analyses performed, one last year and one this year. The only questionable result is the high lead for both reports. Per the report it's possible, but not likely that there's a bearing problem...I hope not!

Along with the report an incident happend that is now concerning me...about 3 years ago I went to crank my truck one night and that thing knocked like someone had sledge hammer knocking on the block! It was cold that night, low 40's upper 30's I think, I remote started it and immediately turned it off when I heard the knocking. I had just gotten an oil change, but I went and checked the oil level it was fine. So I went and cranked it again, no knocking, but it did puff out some black smoke once it cranked. Afterwards, all seemed fine and off to work I went. Of course, it has always knocked slightly on cold days at first start up like most if not all Tundras of this gen, but the knock I heard was definitely NOT that knock!! Anyway, the truck ran fine and still is, but once I got the oil analyzed this event came back to mind.

Anyone have any info to share based on my comments and the report?

Thanks!!!
 

Attachments

·
Moderator
2015 Toyota Tundra DC SR5 5.7L
Joined
·
8,536 Posts
Not sure what the huge knock was, but it doesn't seem to bear on the lead level you reported.

Comparative lead levels can increase in a motor oil and show up in a UOA report due to:

1. Introduction of certain fuel additives, especially octane boosters
2. Running an engine easily for months at a time, and then driving it hard, i.e. towing, hauling etc.

Bearing surfaces can get galling that doesn't get worn off under easy driving. It requires the stresses created by harder driving to get those surfaces in constant contact with the bearing race surfaces to grind this corrosion off.

I also noted elevated magnesium levels as well, so I'm guessing you either introduced a fuel additive and/or switched your oil type?

Regardless, those metal numbers aren't that high. I wouldn't worry about it too much. If they started climbing steadily, then you might want to pay closer attention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
606 Posts
I had a similar issue with my 2000 Tundra V-8 around the same mileage as yours (high Pb). Blackstone eventually told me it was probably a fuel additive leaching the lead from the babbitt bearings. So I switched from using Chevron with Techron to Shell 89 gasoline. The lead readings dropped considerably after doing this gasoline switch. I also stopped using Techron concentrated fuel system cleaner a couple of times during the OCI. I recommend that you try something simple like this before you start panicking.

Here is the UOA history on my truck. I think you will be able to tell when the gasoline change occurred:

LE8130/10W-30, 5650 miles, 2000 Tundra V-8 - Bob Is The Oil Guy
 

·
Moderator
2015 Toyota Tundra DC SR5 5.7L
Joined
·
8,536 Posts
...Blackstone eventually told me it was probably a fuel additive leaching the lead from the babbitt bearings....
I was reading that internal combustion engines use the tin-based babbitt material for bearings and races because the lead-based ones got brittle. I wonder what Toyota uses? :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
606 Posts
Toyota, as well as all manufacturers get their bearings from several different suppliers. So it's difficult to determine what the engine has, even on same engines built the same day in the factory.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top