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Hi folks,

I am new to this forum. I just bought a 2010 Tundra Double cab 4.6L 4X4 and recieved a 2 year free maintenance with it as part of the deal. They told me it is basically just 2 oil changes since these Tundras come with 0W20 synthetic oil and don't need to be changed till 10k miles! I know synthetic oils las much longer than convensional, but I would be very weary of waiting till 10K miles to change the oil in my brand new truck. what do you guys think and what has been your experiences? Also what about breaking-in the engine. I believe these engines don't need to be "broke-in" like older generations. they are basically broke in when built at the factory due to better machining and manufacturing techniques. what do you think?

Thanks for your input.
Deer Slayer
 

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Hey Slayer, I'm basically new here too and also just got a 2010 5.7 Tundra.
I was looking in the manual yesterday because I too was curious about recommended oils and intervals. I saw nothing in the book about Toyota stating synthetic was in it from the factory or that they recommended it when changing. FWIW I plan on going about 5 to 6000 and then change with mobil 1 or Toyota 0w20 synthetic. I might change the filter only at 2 to 3000 miles.
I'm kinda old school and I believe whatever Toyota put in it at the factory is a break- in type oil and changing over too quickly to synthetic would mess with rings and bearings seating in properly.
Hope that helps and good luck with your truck.
Andy
 

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Welcome to the Forum! What are the service intervals listed in your Owners Manual and Service Record book? My '07 says 5000 miles...are the 2010's now listed as 10,000 mile intervals? If not, you could be looking at a problem if there is a warranty issue...no matter what your friendly dealer tells you...unless you have them put it in writing. I do my own...switched to Mobil 1 0W-20 at 1500 miles. Change it at 5k...now at 60k and it still purrs like a kitten. Oil is cheap, engines are not.
 

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well im not sure what the book says about the 4.6 but its been discussed alot here.

that said, 10k isnt a big deal if thats what teh manufacturer calls for. my corvette had an oil life monitor that would not go by just miles but all the other factors and i'd get 7500 out of an oil change, my parents with a similar corvette would granny drive theirs and never get the change oil soon message till after 10k miles.

our mercedes (mobil 1 0w40 euro spec) calls for oil changes every 13k miles.

no vehicle ive ever had (other than our boat) has needed a "special" oil change early for break in. i think thats all old tales now and isnt necessary.
 

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Hi folks,

I am new to this forum. I just bought a 2010 Tundra Double cab 4.6L 4X4 and recieved a 2 year free maintenance with it as part of the deal. They told me it is basically just 2 oil changes since these Tundras come with 0W20 synthetic oil and don't need to be changed till 10k miles! I know synthetic oils las much longer than convensional, but I would be very weary of waiting till 10K miles to change the oil in my brand new truck. what do you guys think and what has been your experiences? Also what about breaking-in the engine. I believe these engines don't need to be "broke-in" like older generations. they are basically broke in when built at the factory due to better machining and manufacturing techniques. what do you think?

Thanks for your input.
Deer Slayer
A long time ago I had the same question and after much research and reading, I narrowed it down to the conclusion that you should change the oil based on your driving conditions and environment. As an example, if you live in a place like Arizona and you drive about 100 miles day, where most of your driving terrain is up and down like a roller coaster. . .and the environment (heat, dust, etc.) become a slight factor, you might need to change your oil sooner than let's say someone driving his Tundra in Houston 30 miles a day. Also, most (if not all) newer vehicles have built-in oil monitoring computers (the Tundra has one) which analyzes and monitors the oil life in your vehicle based on driving conditions, engine and fuel parameters, and is actually more reliable than mile-based oil changes. For example, this is from one manufacturer's oil monitoring system:

There are six inputs used by the PCM. The factors which indicate severe use (and a shorter oil change interval) for each of these inputs are listed below:
  • Ambient temperature – extended periods of low temperature operation
  • Average vehicle speed – stop and go driving
  • Engine run time – prolonged idling
  • Trip length and coolant temperatures – short trips
  • Engine speed and load – trailer tow usage
  • Flex-fuel percentage – ethanol percentage of more than 60%
The Tundra's oil monitoring system may have even more inputs. I have not had a chance to look at the Tundra's recommended oil change interval but I know that for cars like Honda (5,000 miles for severe, 10,000 miles for normal driving), BMW and VW are like 10,000 and 15,000 miles!! I'm sure the Tundra is in that neighborhood somewhere.

I do not change my oil every 3,000 miles. Most of the time, it's more like 5,000 miles or longer. I've only changed the oil in my Tundra twice since I've had it and it is around 12,000+ miles on the odometer. Both times I waited for the maintenance light to come on and then picked a convenient time to change the oil.

If you're planning on using synthetic, and your driving conditions are not extreme (like putting on lots of miles in Iraq or something like that), my opinion is you can go 10K without any issues. But do what you are comfortable with and read the Toyota warranty. I do agree that oil changes are cheap and engines are not.

If you have a chance, visit these two links for starters, and then do a Google search on the 3,000-mile oil change. As evident from most of the replies here, the 3,000-mile oil change is really "old school" that's been carried over the years. The information you pick up can be applied as an answer to your 10K synthetic oil change question.

3,000 mile myth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://www.amsoil.com/news/LubeReport6-11-08 .pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the good inputs.
I wanted to mention something else. when I first bought my Tundra, checked the oil and it sure didn't see like the real thin 0W-20 weigth it was supposed to be. It looked and felt more like 5W-30 (just from experience and the thick nature it looked on dipstick and felt in my fingers). but werid thing that happened, couple days after I picked up the truck, when it only had about 140 miles, the engine light came on. I couldn't figure out the reason why. I had to take my truck to the dealer to have a bed liner installed, so I also had them check the light out. They changed the oil in it and it made the light to go away. they told me recently they have the same thing happen on other Tundras and once they change the oil, the engine light goes off!
I personally think the oil it came with from the factory was convension heavier oil, most likely 5W-30, for the purpose of "breaking-in", and once the engine is so called "broke-in" the engine light indicates that it has done its job and it is time to get dumped and replaced with the recomended oil (0W-20 which only comes in synthetic form) and that is what the dealer did.
Any body else has had similar experience?
 

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I personally think the oil it came with from the factory was convension heavier oil, most likely 5W-30, for the purpose of "breaking-in", and once the engine is so called "broke-in" the engine light indicates that it has done its job and it is time to get dumped and replaced with the recomended oil (0W-20 which only comes in synthetic form) and that is what the dealer did.
Any body else has had similar experience?
No such thing as break in oil in the Tundra. The 2010's have a TSB issued on the Check Engine Light...something to do with the valve timing, and for some reason it's been blamed on the oil. The problem has been discussed on this Forum, so you may find some Threads by searching.
 

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My issue is more about time interval than mileage. I have an 08 DCSB I bought in October, 2008. I don't drive it much because I have a 1995 Tacoma I use as an every day driver/ beater truck. The beast has only 3100 miles on it to date. Modding it is an ongoing hobby more than anything else. Does anyone know how quickly the oil deteriorates just sitting in the crankcase not being used? Is time interval as important as mileage interval? And how will this affect the warranty? Suppose I purchased the Tundra at the right time and the right price just to store it away for say, an early retirement gift? Should I still follow the time intervals for maintenance? Any comments would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No such thing as break in oil in the Tundra. The 2010's have a TSB issued on the Check Engine Light...something to do with the valve timing, and for some reason it's been blamed on the oil. The problem has been discussed on this Forum, so you may find some Threads by searching.
Thanks for the info. I can accept that there is no such thing as "break in" oil. I was assuming that Toyota had a purpose for putting a heavier oil in there at the factory, but what you tell me about the TSB and valve timing makes sense. Most toyota truck engines, at least my previous 2008 Tacoma 2.7 L have VVT which uses oil as the hydraulic fluid to operate the valves, so if the viscosity of oil is different than what it was designed for, it could affect valve timing and cause the engine light to come on.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No such thing as break in oil in the Tundra. The 2010's have a TSB issued on the Check Engine Light...something to do with the valve timing, and for some reason it's been blamed on the oil. The problem has been discussed on this Forum, so you may find some Threads by searching.
Lee,

I haven't had much luck looking for links that discuss this issue on 2010 Tundras. Can you help me with that? thanks alot.
 

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My issue is more about time interval than mileage. I have an 08 DCSB I bought in October, 2008. I don't drive it much because I have a 1995 Tacoma I use as an every day driver/ beater truck. The beast has only 3100 miles on it to date. Modding it is an ongoing hobby more than anything else. Does anyone know how quickly the oil deteriorates just sitting in the crankcase not being used? Is time interval as important as mileage interval? And how will this affect the warranty? Suppose I purchased the Tundra at the right time and the right price just to store it away for say, an early retirement gift? Should I still follow the time intervals for maintenance? Any comments would be appreciated. Thanks.
Your engine isn't sealed to the outside. Water vapor will get into the oil over time and in extreme cases cause the oil to become milky. A good safe bet is an annual oil change and drive the thing at least 20 miles a month - once a week would be even better.

Edit: And at least once a month put it into 4x4 and drive a couple of miles. While you're at it, turn on the AC and let the refrigerant oil circulate in that system too. Don't ask how I know these things :(
 

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I use Amsoil 0-30 oil and the Amsoil Ea oil filter (the Ea is no longer recommended by Amsoil and Toyota because of the 'problem')
and change both at the rated life of 25,000 miles. I use a larger than stock filter.

Oil analysis said I shouldn't have thrown the oil out, it was still good after 25,000 miles.

When I get the money together I'll get the by-pass filter and be able to go much longer between oil changes.
 

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Absolutely your engine has to be "broken in"... the need is even more now than it was before because before it was done beforehand and people complained that they bought a new car and the engine was already run for 500+ miles. Hence, you should break your truck in gradually according to specs... I think the first 600 miles are the most critical.
As for oil change intervals. Synthetic can last you 25K miles if you wanted it to... it doesn't break down nearly as easily as regular oil since it is absolutely clean. Having said that, the issue isn't about it being clean with your first change anyway... it is making sure that any small metal parts don't get continually cycled through the engine bay. Get the first oil change done within 5K. You can do 10K intervals after that with synthetic oil, no problem.
In my experience, the maintenance indicator light seems to come back on exactly 3,000 miles from the last time it was reset... either that or it is 3 or 6 months or maybe some combo of whichever comes first. Point being that, at least to me, it isn't reading any signs or doing any diagnostics on the oil itself. So, just keep a record of when you do it or pick an interval that is easy to remember. Good luck!
 

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Absolutely your engine has to be "broken in"... the need is even more now than it was before because before it was done beforehand and people complained that they bought a new car and the engine was already run for 500+ miles. Hence, you should break your truck in gradually according to specs... I think the first 600 miles are the most critical.
As for oil change intervals. Synthetic can last you 25K miles if you wanted it to... it doesn't break down nearly as easily as regular oil since it is absolutely clean. Having said that, the issue isn't about it being clean with your first change anyway... it is making sure that any small metal parts don't get continually cycled through the engine bay. Get the first oil change done within 5K. You can do 10K intervals after that with synthetic oil, no problem.
In my experience, the maintenance indicator light seems to come back on exactly 3,000 miles from the last time it was reset... either that or it is 3 or 6 months or maybe some combo of whichever comes first. Point being that, at least to me, it isn't reading any signs or doing any diagnostics on the oil itself. So, just keep a record of when you do it or pick an interval that is easy to remember. Good luck!
I looked thru the owner's manual soon after I bought my truck and did not see anything at all in there that even mentions engine "break-in". Also the new 4.6L Tundras only call out 0W-20 oil which only comes in synthetic form. You can not do the old fashion engine break-in with synthetic oil.
 

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Consider...it came from the factory with 0-20 synthetic oil. My Toyota dealer said they no longer use 'break-in oil' and over the years a number of mechanics and engineers have told me the break-in process of my grandfather is no longer necessary because the machined tolerances are so much finer than then. The basic rule is simply to be gentle, something that is good to continue doing.

If your engine burns oil, more than a quart in the 5,000 miles between times your mantainence light comes on, you might switch to a non-detergent 20 weight conventional oil, if there is such a thing, to allow the friction allowed by the lesser oil to seat the rings.
 

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I don't know of any new vehicle that doesn't require a break-in period... even race cars that are multi-million dollar builds using tolerances we'd only dream of still require it. Just because you use a synthetic oil doesn't mean the engine doesn't need to be broken in. There are many resources on the web that explain how to do it with both regular and synthetic oils. Look at Mobil 1's response and how they explain the need for break-in even when using their synthetic oil. Look at it here.
More here too (though here Mobil actual claims that no break-in is required on many vehicles, but the other manufactures disagree). And more break-in info is located here.
Point is we have a truck that is meant for lots of payload and towing capabilities. No new engine should be enduring those things initially. I'm pretty sure my owner's manual or at the very least the dealership I bought the truck from recommended no heavy hauling/towing for the first 600 miles -- also no harsh acceleration (i.e. really revving up the RPMs) during that time too.
In my opinion, there isn't much benefit to NOT breaking in your engine... just keeping a cool head for the first little while isn't going to hurt you or anything.
 
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