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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got a Optima Yellow Top D35 (recommended size for the Tundra + tried the D34 but would require new cabling that is longer).

So, looking at the specs, the D35 has a 650CCA rating and 100 minute reserve capacity. The battery I just removed says its a 710CCA and 165 minute reserve.

I got the D35 because I'm installing a Mile Marker SI12000 winch. So I needed a beefier battery and everyone says the Optima Yellow Top is the way to go. Did I really upgrade here?

Edit: I think I understand the difference here. The deep cycle battery will provide a lot of current for periods of time longer than needed to start up the vehicle, e.g. for continuous winching, when the stock battery might crap out during this task, or may not fully recover from this task. So even if I lost some cranking amps and reserve capacity, the trade-off would be justified by the advantage of being able to draw more current for longer periods, the maintenance free function, vibration resistance, and size, as well as being able to recover from being discharged fully and very rapidly. So, with that in mind, anyone have a reason to believe this wouldn't be an upgrade?
 

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Nope your assessment is correct,you did good :clap2:
I have several Optima's currently in service,one is nearing 15 years old
and has never had an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What kind of winch mount are you gonna use?
I ordered an Iron Bull winch bumper that should be getting shipped to me on Monday. It's a pretty good looking bumper, hope the quality is as good as the looks.
 

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I went with the same Optima battery, no complaints here, works great with my plow.a
 

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Optima Yellow Tops are designed to be (deep cycle) auxillary batteries, not starting batteries.

I would never use a Yellow Top as my only battery. Secondary yes, primary... no way.

Good luck!
 

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Look, I would personally not worry too much about the starting aspects of the Yellow top Optima "as long it meets the specs for your engine".

If the minimum CCA recommendation is met then your fine. On the other hand if it is lower than the recommendation then you are obviously not meeting that specific amperage.

Now realistically if the climate you live in is never cold you will likely be fine. The problem still lies in that since CCA is a typical rating and warm cranking amp's (which are higher) from the same CCA rated battery are what is required to consistently start the engine in a warm climate.

Toyota says you need say 710 CCA, when warm your Yellow top will likely meet this rating, but what we don't know is that maybe Toyota has a required "warm" cranking amp rating. Therefore your Yellow top would not meet that requirement.

It's a gamble in my opinion. Also if you drain that Yellow top battery by using accessories you may notice the engine waning on start-up (that is when you buy the Red top).

Your kind of in an experimentation phase right now. Also that drained Yellow top will place a longer load on your alternator causing it charge longer and get hotter therefore decreasing it's lifespan.

1. Use current setup, be aggressive with drainage
2. Check start-up behavior
3. Adjust accordingly
a. To adjust: Buy Red top, keep and recharge Yellow top
b. Set up dual battery management system, Red for starting and Yellow for accessories.

Hope I did not sound like an idiot in this post but I this is what I know and how I would proceed given your current situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I guess its a good thing I live in sunny California. My impression is that everyone running the Yellow Top appears to have no problem with them. I do hear the few that mention the Yellow Tops not being for starting, but I wondered why Optima would recommend a battery for the Tundra if they didn't feel that it would meet the requirements for a replacement. For now, I will keep the Yellow Top as the main and only battery, always bringing in the extra stocker on trips as a backup. Eventually, I'll figure out what to do about this dual battery setup and run a Red Top for starting. I don't want to run it to the bed, as in my CM, the bed is small and I'd like to maintain usability of the whole bed. I can't figure out a good place to put a secondary one in. Guess I'll take it slow and figure it out as I go.
 

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If you do become dead set on mounting that second battery here is an idea that most off road guys use:

1. Remove stock airbox, replace with single cone filter, may have to or want to make custom air pipe with silicone connectors.
2. Tack weld a level gripper plate for the second battery with retaining strap (metal or Nylon).
3. Rewire, solenoid, power swithch or whatever meets your needs.

P.S. Gripper plate can be anything that the battery can sit on and not fall off of. Preferably something with a lip like some angle iron, etc.

Honestly you will probably be fine as long as your not using your truck like a AAA Tow truck.

In time all batteries fail to retain a charge. I suggest you buy a good battery charger with a micro processor and multiple charging applications (trickle in your case). Everyone shoud own one, it's the only way to get the maximum life out of your battery especially with the initial investment of an Optima or other highend battery. They are just like vehicles, they need a certain amount of maitenence to last.
 

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I have the Yellow Top in both my Tahoe and my Tundra. The Tahoe sits for hours on end running emergency lights, sometimes it idles sometimes not (depending on the temperature at the time). I absolutely LOVE my Yellow Top! I think you did the right thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
During my 4 day trip across the Mojave Road, I ran into a guy that was stuck in some deep sand. It was a 2WD Dodge Ram, his buddy with a 4x4 Silverado was trying to pull him out with running tugs, but that was not working too well. Being eager to use the winch for the first time, I setup to winch him out. The winch distance was a good 75 feet to some solid ground. Pulled him out contiuously, keeping an eye on the temp of the winch of course, but it didn't get hot or anything, so I kept going. Probably a good 10 minute winch session, with small breaks < 1 minute. The Optima definitely handled it with ease and was able to start the Tundra back up several times after that. I didn't touch my spare battery at all during the trip which involved music playing for hours and aux lighting use, etc. Must say, glad to have the optima.
 
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