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RoundOut,

how did yo clean the MAF sensor? what was the procedure. This MAF doesn't look like most, it seems be a bit complicated inside. Can you explain the procedure.

thanks
Magellan
 

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magellan44,

Its been a while, but if I remember correctly, it was nothing more than spraying a cleaner purchased at O'Reileys Auto Parts. Remove the device with a couple small bolts or screws, unplug a tube, spray in the cleaner, it dries quickly, replace.

There is not much to go wrong on these, but mine may have eventually failed on a trip to Colorado a few years ago. I picked one up, replaced it with the new one, and still had one of two codes that I originally had. In fact, I think this may have been when I noticed the pinhole leak on my header manifold that eventually broke. Therefore, it was probably fine, and just the header needing replacement.

Moral of the story... if you suspect a MAF problem, clean it and check the manifolds carefully for leaks before dropping the bucks on a new one. Of course, a new MAF is a bunch cheaper than replacing a manifold or exhaust header, but if it isn't the problem, it won't stop the codes from coming.
 

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RoundOut,
thanks for the reply, I did remove it and cleaned with the recommended cleaner. After that I had to run to the auto parts for a battery terminal so I asked the fellow to check the codes for me and he was good enough to do so. I also had him check my battery life, my Tundra is an 06 with an in service date of 12/13/05 and I had the OEM battery still. It was turning into a game with me to see how long it would last. Well, it was fully charged but did show a bad cell so I replaced it. So obviously the Check Engine light went out with the new battery being installed but I knew it was not the fix and the light did come back on after an hour of driving.

Getting back to the Oxygen sensor. he pulled a code of P2197 and this is the definition of what it said.
1) Oxygen sensoror A/F sensor stuck lean -bank 2 sensor 1
2) Open or short circuit condition
3) Poor electircal connection
4) Failed AF sensor
5) lean AF ratio-fuel pressure, vacuum leak, MAF sensor fault

After all of this multiple choice what's a guy to do? I was hoping for a more familiar code so i could get to it but now i'm hesitant to change anyone of them. Maybe I should pay a garage try to get a more exact code. I will say this that the only thing I can see that is different about the truck is that the idle is fluctuating between 550 and 650 so the engine seems to be pulsing slightly and that is why i thought the MAP sensor might be my problem. But now i'm not sure.

thanks again for the reply

By the way the bank 2 is the passager side correct and position 1 would be the one on the manifold correct! I see that mine are the ones with the blue tag on them. There is a difference between the upstream bank 1 and bank 2 correct?
One other question, other than disconnecting the battery is there any way to turn off the code once the problem is corrected other than by a garage with a meter?
 

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Magellen44,

Bank 2 Sensor 1 is the Passenger side on the exhaust manifold that is directly attached to the engine block. I don't recall the exact position of the sensor, but no matter where it is, it will be a PITA to get off. Take your time and use PB Blaster, walk away for a half hour or more, and then use a socket kit that you can borrow from the local O'Reilleys. The hardest part for me (with large hands and fingers) was unplugging the electrical connection. You may wish to try unplugging the electrical connection first. You can also borrow the code reader and clearer from the auto parts store. By borrowing, I mean you pay for the tools and then return them. O'Reilleys has sets of these tools set aside just for this purpose.

Chances are pretty good it is the sensor. I don't recall exactly, but I know I've replaced at least 4 in about 200000 miles.
 

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RoundOut,

Thank you for the reply, yes i was under there yesterday and I played around to see if i could get at them. wow is that tight. I did unplug the connector and checked out the available space. Amazing how tight, Again I thank you for the help. It's nice to have you guys around to bounce things off of. I think i'll order the part today from one of the online auto parts. My local Auto Zone wanted $180.00 for the Denso. I believe Auto Geek was about $123.00, Rock Auto was about $150.00.

thank you
 

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Fellows,
I have one more question before I buy the parts. I've been reading and I've seen when looking at the parts that some say an Air Flow Sensor is also required. Now, is one of the sensors an Air Flow Sensor and one an Oxygen Sensor? I'm specifically talking about the two upstream sensors. Is the bank 2 sensor the Air Flow Sensor? and the bank 1 the Oxygen Sensor? I know they are both called O2 sensors but as I'm reading the parts catalogs they keep mentioning the Air Flow and the Oxygen and not interchangeable Can you advise me before I purchase

thank you
 

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Toyota sent out a notice to replace Number 1 O2 sensors in the exhaust manifolds (trouble code P0135 and P0155) at their cost as an extension to the Tundra's Emissions Warranty - "2000 to MID-2002 Model Year Tundra V8 (2UZ-FE Enigine) Oxygen Sensor Warranty Enhancement Notice". Unfortunately, the warranty was for 7-years or 90K miles. Considering your milage, I would push for the warranty. If YOU must replace them , buy the O2 sensors at RockAuto Parts Catalog - the least expensive that I have found - $60.89 each for Denso Part # 2344169 OEM. Good luck!
Yup, I received direct compensation from Toyota for the "O2 Warranty Notice".
I received a check from Toyota that covered parts and labor.
 

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HighwayLizard,

Your posting is in error. I don't know where you acquired your info but it is not accurate. The Bosch sensors work fine and, yes, I have replaced failed sensors with Bosch products and had no issues.

Where, specifically, did you get your info?
 

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Hi,
While driving the other day, my check engine light came on. After checking Tundrasolutions, I drove to my local Autozone, and bought a code reader for $65. (I live in Calif, so they would not check it for free) After I attached the code reader, I got a p0031 code. Again, looking it up on Tundrasolutions, I knew it was the bank 1 sensor 1 oxygen sensor. I took another drive to the dealer, where I had to shell out $167.00 for a new one. Now came the fun part. Replacing the old one!! The first step was to locate it. If followed the driver side exhaust, until i found the catalytic convertor. I looked in front of it, and there it was. Unhooking the plastic connector, was a challenge.

Using a super small screw driver, I lifted the tab on the bottom with one hand, and pried the connector apart with the other. Took a little while, but I was able to get it.
The next step was to get the sensor off.

I put some oil on the top part of the sensor, and then let it drip down. I then used the slotted socket, I bought for $15.00.

I slipped the wire through the slot, and with a little elbow grease, was able to take the sensor out.

I then screwed in the new one, and tightened it with the socket. Last step was to use the code reader to erase the code from the Tundra. After that, I fired up the car, and took it for a test drive. No more check engine light. Took about 1 hour to do, and was not tough at all. By the time I got done, it cost me $237 but that included the code reader, and socket. If you can get a free code check, that knocks $65.00 off it. I am still not sure how much the dealer would have charged me, but I have a feeling it would be more that $237:rolleyes:
I dont know what's going on my 2009 Tundra has 156 I on it but gas mileage started to Dwindle, I already cleaned the mass fuel flow sensor so I decided to change all 4 O2 sensors. If you use an O2 sensor socket a blast of WD40 they will come out with no problem but I did use a 1/2" breaker bar but no stripped threads. The hardest part was pulling the electrical clips/plugs whatever you may call them. Completeted this task in about 2 hours even with taking the O2 socket set back to Auto Zone. One last suggestion, dont use the long socket as it wants to spread, use the short cross feet. The sensors will be tight so you'll have to put a little muscle into it. Goodluck!
 

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Here's a question if there is an exhaust manifold leak will it cause sensor 2 to read and be stuck below .1 volts? Mine is throwing a P0136 code. I can see on the OBD2 reader that the voltage on all the other 3 sensors moving around so they are working but Bank 1 Sensor 2 is reading below .1 volt. I also back probe the sensor wires at that are part of the O2 sensor and it was also reading below .1 volt.
 
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