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Today's Detroit News, a paper with a long history of Big-3 boosterism, has a positive article on the 2007 Tundra.

Highlights:
  • Big Three executives wring their hands over its arrival and critique every square inch. Metro Detroiters, the most car-educated population in the world, spend hours berating it on the Internet.
  • And the 2007 Toyota Tundra packs plenty to scare the bejesus out of the American pickup makers: The second-generation Tundra is the best truck Toyota Motor Corp. has ever built.
  • The independent double wishbone front suspension and rear leaf springs, both with nitrogen gas shocks, provided an excellent ride on the SR5 4x4 Double Cab I tested for a week. I hardly ever noticed a bump, even near my home in Gibraltar, a small town renowned for boating and railroad crossings.
  • The rack-and-pinion steering is crisp and clean. It's effortless to maneuver and precise. Point it in the right direction and the Tundra gets there quickly and quietly. Wind and engine noise was nearly nonexistent and road noise from the standard 18-inch tires is nil. Libraries are louder than this brute idling.
  • It looks good, but it's hardly original.
  • Inside there are lots of helpful little features: Two 12-volt power outlets, a second glove box on the dash, storage nooks along the doors and map pockets on the back. Everything feels nicely organized and thoughtfully constructed. The second-row seats fold up or down, depending on your needs.
Lowlights:
  • Toyota offers three engines, three cab styles, three trim levels and an assortment of bed configurations. While a huge leap for Toyota, it falls short of the choices available from the Big Three pickups.
  • While Toyota says the engine, which can tow up to 10,800 pounds, should get 18 miles per gallon on the highway, I was never able to average more than 15.8 mpg, according to the truck's readout. Around town, I managed 12.7 mpg, despite an EPA number of 14 mpg city driving. Part of my low city mileage could be attributed to aggressive driving.
  • Toyota increased the Tundra's length, height, wheelbase and width. Measuring 6 feet, 3 inches tall, up to 19 feet long and 6 feet, 10 inches wide, the Tundra wouldn't squeeze into my garage.
  • It looks good, but it's hardly original.
  • Its interior felt clinical and devoid of personality. It's functional, but not inspiring.
Considering the source (Toyota's new Tundra strikes fear among Big 3, but it's not perfect) -- high praise.
 

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"Big Three executives wring their hands over its arrival and critique every square inch. Metro Detroiters, the most car-educated population in the world, spend hours berating it on the Internet."

Yes, I've been lurking but have to agree - seen the trolls here. They dont add much and pi** me off!!!
 
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