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Payload problem when towing. I have never towed. I want to replace my 2001 Tundra with a 2010 Tundra, 5.7, SR5 4x4 to tow a 7,000 lb. TT(when loaded). The problem is the payload (with tow package) is 1564 lbs. Deducting the 540 lb. "hitch weight" leaves 1,025 lbs. With 4 passengers (600-800 lbs), fuel (180 lbs), canopy (200 lbs), I am at or above the payload limit without putting any cargo in the bed. Is this a legitimate concern? I want to be well below limits, so after dumping the canopy, what are my options? If air bags, any concern about the frame or other components? Please do not tell me there is an F-150 or 250 in my future.
 

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I won't say it's a problem, as it's not. But... so you know, your camper tongue weight will be a lot more than 540 lbs when the camper is loaded to 7k lbs... probably more like 800 to 1000 lbs.
 

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Well i think Toyota includes a full fuel tank in there payload so you don't have to worry about fuel and yea id ditch the canopy. Toyota is fairly conservative in there Payload/towing caps on the Tundra because god knows it pulls better than the F-150 but id never tow a crap load over the payload cap for a long time.

You could always add the air bags, or do an add a-leaf as a cheaper alternative, that would be a big plus if your gonna tow that much weight, that will also keep the bump stops from hitting and prevent the back of the truck from sagging.

As a general rule of thumb you shouldn't really have a lot of weight in your bed while towing anyway. 7,000lbs is a lot of weight, your going to need a trailer brake controller without a doubt!

Make no mistake the Tundra tows great, i pull a 9,000lbs toy hauler when loaded and we've been all over the country with it, including going through the rocky's four times. Ive had four people in it before but Ive never had anything in the bed while towing that trailer before.

On another note, a half ton will never pull as good as a diesel, you cant do anything about that. A half ton is a half ton a 3/4 ton is a 3/4 ton. Period
 

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You'll want to upgrade to E range tires(I believe the most important thing you can do).
Invest in the air bags(they'll help you fine tune the ride attitude). Some will tell you to add the TRD sway control, I can't speak on that as I don't have one(too much off road). I pull toy hauler at between 7-9k depending on load, I try to keep the bed load down but I useally end up with @ 300-400 in the bed(fire wood, tools, air compressor). Don't forget you'll have a weight dist. hitch(this will distribute the tounge load between the front and rear axles) and a sway control of some sort. (get a set up with the built in sway control,search this site). In no way would I sweat the kind of load you're talking about.
The Tundra is way over built.
 

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If you are that concerned about weight then I think your best bet is to weigh the truck then hookup the trailer and weigh it all. I think you will be surprised at the numbers. For one thing a weight distributing hitch will move some of that hitch weight back to the trailer. You want to be sure and get axle weights and not just totals.
 

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I have the airbags but always have wondered what my max payload is with them. The bags I think are rated at 3500 to 5200 pounds, can't remember what mine are rated at. They are firestones if anyone knows. Does this mean I could put 3000 pounds in my bed or would my actual axle be close to the breaking point? I was thinking about getting 3000 pounds of bagged manure for my yard in one trip. I just don't want to break my axle. I know the bags will handle it but what about the truck? I could always make a couple of trips but would really like to impress the Home Depot guy. :D
 

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I have the airbags but always have wondered what my max payload is with them. The bags I think are rated at 3500 to 5200 pounds, can't remember what mine are rated at. They are firestones if anyone knows. Does this mean I could put 3000 pounds in my bed or would my actual axle be close to the breaking point? I was thinking about getting 3000 pounds of bagged manure for my yard in one trip. I just don't want to break my axle. I know the bags will handle it but what about the truck? I could always make a couple of trips but would really like to impress the Home Depot guy. :D
I'd bet a large sum of money your truck would handle it just fine.
 

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The firestone airbags are rated for 5k lbs if i remember right; and according to Hino who made the axle on the 5.7 tundra, the axle can handle all of that.

I wouldn't be worrying at all about the axle; it can take it. Plus with 3 bearing points on each side, you're much better off with bags.
 

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Yes!! Here I come Home Depot guy!!! :)
 

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Yes!! Here I come Home Depot guy!!! :)
Hahaha make sure you do this in front of all the F-series, Dodge and Chevy guys standing in front of Home Depot too!:becky:
 

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I tow a 6000 lb trailer with a 750 lb tongue weight and haul a 700 pound ATV in the back of the truck along wit 500 lbs of people and stuff in the truck. I use a set of air bags and have had NO issues carrying that weight, none. I am currently using the stock tires and they do ok, when these wear out I plan on going to a set of LTs (mabie). The axle rating on the truck is 4000 lbs front and 4000 lbs rear and the rating for the stock tires all round totals 10000 pounds. You can handle that weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks to all. This forum is great! I'll buy the TRD w/tow pkg. Then I'll add air bags (and/or a leaf), upgraded tires, and weigh the axels to be sure not to exceed the GAWR. If this is overkill--good. Since I am new at towing, I need the comfort level.
 

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Hey Ready, I went from an '00 Tundra V-8 to an '08 5.7 Tundra. We pulled our 7,500# TT many miles with each. The '08 is a great improvement. I have pulled the TT about 20,000 miles with it, about 15,000 without air bags and the balance with airbags (Helwig). With an equilizer hitch, I can't tell much difference with the bags during normal towing. Where I can is when I hit an unexpedted dip in the roadway. I have been wearing out the OEM Goodyear tires, but will replace them with LT rated tires in the next 5,000 miles or so. Changing from OEM Goodyears to Michelin LT tires on the '00 Tundra made a significant improvement. I suspect that I will get a little improvement with the same change on the '08.

I don't think you will have any problems with the load you describe, particularly with a load leveling hitch. The bags and tires are added assurance that you will tow in comfort.
 

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Payload problem when towing. I have never towed. I want to replace my 2001 Tundra with a 2010 Tundra, 5.7, SR5 4x4 to tow a 7,000 lb. TT(when loaded). The problem is the payload (with tow package) is 1564 lbs. Deducting the 540 lb. "hitch weight" leaves 1,025 lbs. With 4 passengers (600-800 lbs), fuel (180 lbs), canopy (200 lbs), I am at or above the payload limit without putting any cargo in the bed. Is this a legitimate concern? I want to be well below limits, so after dumping the canopy, what are my options? If air bags, any concern about the frame or other components? Please do not tell me there is an F-150 or 250 in my future.

Even though you're correct in that you're maxing out your GVW, you're still well under your COMBINED GVW (CGVW) of 16,000.

What makes you think a Ford 150 will be any different???
 

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Well i think Toyota includes a full fuel tank in there payload so you don't have to worry about fuel
With all due respect, NOBODY includes ANYTHING in their payloads. It's a very simple formula: GVW - Empty truck equals payload. Anything that adds weight subtracts from payload......including fuel.
 

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I won't say it's a problem, as it's not. But... so you know, your camper tongue weight will be a lot more than 540 lbs when the camper is loaded to 7k lbs... probably more like 800 to 1000 lbs.

Agreed.
 

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Time4change, Actually I was being facetious about the F150. I have owned a Tundra LTD since 2001 and will buy the new one. I admit to being a little frustrated by the low payload of the Tundra, but it is only a 1/2 ton.
 

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Time4change, Actually I was being facetious about the F150. I have owned a Tundra LTD since 2001 and will buy the new one. I admit to being a little frustrated by the low payload of the Tundra, but it is only a 1/2 ton.


Right on, I thought you may have fell into Ford's advertising BS where they have 1 configuration of "1/2" ton where they brag on payload.

The problem with just listing "max payload" is all manufacturers will use the lightest configuration of truck. Just a WAG that a fully loaded LTD wil be heavier than the Tundra Grade truck the max payload is based on; which even further "limits" your payload.


Here's the thing though, The GVW at 7200# on the Tundra is one of if not the highest of all the 1/2 tons (except the before mentioned morphidite Ford)

However, the Ford and Tundra are the heaviest trucks when empty.

All the 1/2 tons when similarily equipped have payloads within a few hundred pounds of each other.
 

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Something I thought of is the passenger weight. Sure you're putting 6-800lbs of people in there but they are not all sitting directly over that rear axle, right? So theoretically you could split that weight in half becuse some of it would be over the front axle, right?
 

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Something I thought of is the passenger weight. Sure you're putting 6-800lbs of people in there but they are not all sitting directly over that rear axle, right? So theoretically you could split that weight in half becuse some of it would be over the front axle, right?
Technically "no", but realistically a lot of people simply ignore passenger weight (and whatever else they carry. To me that isn't wise, but there are simple things you can do like add-a-leafs or airbags that will greatly increase your payload capacity. Still, for most of us, we can 500 lbs of people and a 1000 lbs in the bed without issue, so I wouldn't worry too much; especially if you have young kids.
 
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