Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've read that these trucks leak coolant into the transmission through the cooling tube in the radiator, ruining the trans. It seems to be common enough to have a name - pink milkshake.

I tried to buy a 3-row all aluminum rad but it did not fit and I await a refund, for it.

Does anyone know of a source of an all aluminum rad for a '04 sequoia?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
You could also replace the whole radiator every time you change the timing belt. I had to replace it for other reasons but it's not very expensive (even for a good quality one) or hard to do. I admit it seems a bit wasteful but if you're worried about that problem...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
1st I've heard of this issue - Like the Nissan problem from year ago. Sorry to go off-track, but my 02 Limited has only 79k miles and I was wondering if I should do a timing belt/water pump/radiator sooner rather than later? Isn't there a time interval as well as the miles interval for TB replacement? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
1st I've heard of this issue - Like the Nissan problem from year ago. Sorry to go off-track, but my 02 Limited has only 79k miles and I was wondering if I should do a timing belt/water pump/radiator sooner rather than later? Isn't there a time interval as well as the miles interval for TB replacement? Thanks.
I don't think there is a pat answer to that question. Mileage is the only criterion I've heard for a timing belt and many have run the OEM parts until 200k.

It's easy to remove the right (passengers' side) top cover to inspect the belt. Use a flashlight to see the water pump. etc. If the belt is stiff or the least bit frayed, replace it.

Then there is peace of mind - lol. I did mine even though I knew it had been done. Now I know WHEN it was done, what and what kind of parts were replaced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I don't think there is a pat answer to that question. Mileage is the only criterion I've heard for a timing belt and many have run the OEM parts until 200k.

It's easy to remove the right (passengers' side) top cover to inspect the belt. Use a flashlight to see the water pump. etc. If the belt is stiff or the least bit frayed, replace it.

Then there is peace of mind - lol. I did mine even though I knew it had been done. Now I know WHEN it was done, what and what kind of parts were replaced.
Sound advice. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I had the timing belt on mine done shortly after I bought it at 260k miles just for piece of mind. I had no idea if the service had been performed by its previous owners. At least now I know it's good for a while.

What was your source for the info about the coolant in the oil? I looked at Carcomplaints and there's no mention of this kind of problem. There is a record of transmission failures, but not of oil mixing with coolant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I should probably get it done at 18 years on the original. Is TB replacement beyond the average home mechanic's abilities? Although, I might be slightly below average.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I should probably get it done at 18 years on the original. Is TB replacement beyond the average home mechanic's abilities? Although, I might be slightly below average.
Ummm... I would say it's not for beginners.

There are videos on youtube. Their quality is not great. The hardest thing is removing the bolt that holds the vibration damper (bottom pulley where the timing mark is) on and then torquing it upon reassembly.

BUT... it's vital that you understand what you are doing. This is not a parts change. You will need a working knowledge of the overhead-cam with cam follower engine. Without it, I seriously doubt you will prevail. You will destroy your motor, instead.

The cam shafts rotate at half the speed of the crankshaft. Thus the large pulleys on the cams and the smaller one on the crank. The valves MUST NOT be open (protrude into the firing chamber) when the piston comes to the top of the bore! Two things can not occupy the same space at the same time...

I've been turning wrenches (professionally, in my younger years) for 50 years. I was e x t r e m e l y careful, as I did this. I did it in three sessions, of about 4 hours each. The timing marks are very obvious and, with a aisian kit, there are yellow marks on the belt and a good instruction leaflet with drawings.

I would have to say no - do not attemp this particular job. On a risk versus reward basis. If you have ti change your engine - especially in a 4x4, the cost will dwarf what you might save by doing this yourself
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Thanks much for the advice. I do have a bit more experience than I led on. I'll think about it for a bit. Have to drive to TX in June from Boise, and want it done by then. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,245 Posts
At the top of any page in the black header bar you will see the words "Search Community". Type in pink milkshake there and hit enter, you will see a lot of threads on this subject already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
If your running a transmission cooler I wouldn't worry about it. This is mainly an issue with 3rd gen 4runners, I dont hear about it to often on the Sequoia.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
If your running a transmission cooler I wouldn't worry about it. This is mainly an issue with 3rd gen 4runners, I dont hear about it to often on the Sequoia.
I've seen sequoias with ruined transmissions because of this. They did have a lot more miles than mine.

I changed the rad. Cost was ~150 woith a 3-row rad. I'll just say it went toward peace of mind :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
I've seen sequoias with ruined transmissions because of this. They did have a lot more miles than mine.

I changed the rad. Cost was ~150 woith a 3-row rad. I'll just say it went toward peace of mind :)
You're not crazy to worry about it. Rads are not expensive and the peace of mind is worth it, especially with how old these trucks are now. The pink milkshake is a common term for when the ATF cooler that runs through the rad leaks. It was very common on first generation Honda Pilots. In that situation they apparently used different two different kind of metals in the fittings and it greatly accelerated the degradation of the internal ATF cooler. Same thing for some generations of Nissan trucks. I'm sure it happens on Sequoias and Tundras but it doesn't seem to be a common thing. I know that when I had my Pilot it was ALL OVER the forums.This is the first time I've seen it mentioned here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
You're not crazy to worry about it. Rads are not expensive and the peace of mind is worth it, especially with how old these trucks are now. The pink milkshake is a common term for when the ATF cooler that runs through the rad leaks. It was very common on first generation Honda Pilots. In that situation they apparently used different two different kind of metals in the fittings and it greatly accelerated the degradation of the internal ATF cooler. Same thing for some generations of Nissan trucks. I'm sure it happens on Sequoias and Tundras but it doesn't seem to be a common thing. I know that when I had my Pilot it was ALL OVER the forums.This is the first time I've seen it mentioned here.
I first heard of it on a 4runner forum.

I knew there was something wrong with the trannys in those honda suvs but I didn't know what it was. Lots of them dropped dead around here. I'm not a honda guy. Had one once. It was OK but it was dinky. @ 6'2" and 300 pounds, I don't like dinky vehicles :)

These trucks are old, yes. In my state they charge you property tax on your vehicles and they lump it in with your plates. I don't want to pay megabucks for plates, sooo.... That's how f***ing stupid they are - I might buy a new ride, if not for that!

I'm closing in on getting my '04 in shape. Gonna do the lower ball joints (really easy to put them on) and the u-joints too. 138K - it will be time for both of those things soon and I'd rather do then in my driveway than alongside the road, somewhere...

The old rad had a brown top. In the 4runner forum they said that was a way to identify a rad that will cause a pink milkshake. Wifey drives an '01 4runner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I mentioned it above but I didn't explain why -- I replaced my radiator because it was cracked at the upper radiator hose connector. Someone had replaced the Toyota OEM spring clamp with a screw-type clamp and I think that got tightened enough to crack the neck. It took a while to figure that out as it only slightly leaked occasionally but it was a good solid crack and the clamp was just sort of barely holding on but not really.

Now I don't know what happened first but based on that, I would say the plastic might have a shelf life and replacing the radiator every 10-12 years might not be a bad idea. I did the hoses too at the same time (and the timing belt, water pump, etc, etc). It does get expensive but I value reliability and not breaking down on the road and I hate to get taken out by a cooling system issue so it seems cheap on that front (as I do use our Sequoia for long road trips -- I think it's the ultimate road trip vehicle -- at least the most ultimate I've driven).

I went with a DENSO 2210518 replacement radiator from RockAuto. It's listed at $124 right now and I think at the time I figured out it was an OEM part so basically should be same or nearly same quality as original. I was even able to unbolt the mounting parts from the old radiator and bolt them on to the replacement (everything lined up, original had sturdier mounting parts with thicker metal). And I pulled the old foam off and glued that on to the new radiator with 3M trim glue ($3 at Walmart in the auto body area). So basically as good as new.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top