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Ok been doing some reading about lug torque specs

Ive read that 12MM thread 6-lug should be between 70-80 ft. lbs.

I just installed my new wheels using a torque wrench

Crazy thing is when I'm at 50 ft. lbs. the lugs feel really tight

Like if I were to try and take the torque up to 60 I would really have to put some major pressure on the torque wrench to get it to click at 60 ft. lbs.

Is this normal

Why does 50 ft. lbs. seem perfect for my new wheels but every thing I read says between 70-80

This is for my new Fuel-Off-Road Hostage wheels 18 x 9 6-139.7lug 12mm thread
Thanks for any info...
 

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gotta ask the first question what type of torque wrench?

a clicker or one with the arm that shows how much the bar bent and the point shows the pounds? and is the torque wrench calibrated????
a cheap one or what?
cheap ones can get you in trouble
 

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Make sure the stud and lug nut threads are clean and dry. DO NOT lube them, as it will change the required torque to obtain the same level of tightness.
 

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76 ft lbs is the correct amount, and if you are using a quality wrench with a handle about 18 to 20 inches long you will think that is not enough even though you get the click. A decent wrench will start at about $90 bucks and go on up. Paid $120 for mine, its range is 50 to 250.
 

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In the manual it says 85 ftlbs, which IS correct. A little grease is good for the treads, it wont change anything except that the lug nut wont get frozen on.
 

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I believe my manual calls for 83 lb/ft.... it's not quite rocket science though, no harm done if you're off just a bit. Extra points for consistency and tightening in a cross pattern.

It's true that lubing the threads will change the torque reading, but I still use a very small amount of anti-seize.... nothing else. It will help prevent rust or corrosion from rearing its ugly head.
 

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Alloy Rims take a different torque than steel rims and would call the manufacturer of the rims before i messed one up and any kinda lubricant will change the torque on a lug nut! Not saying it's wrong to use it only you should know how to compensate for it when you use it! Also any type of torque wrench is better than those stupid air ratchets that torque to 300 ft Lbs + and the morons that use them! My dealer uses those things and i suppose they have tweaked a bunch of peoples lug nuts and probably have had to replace a few but one thing is for sure that much torque can't be helping an Alloy wheel either!
Wheel Tech - Wheel Lug Torquing
This calculator should explain what the differencesw in torque will actually be!
http://www.rockcrawler.com/techreports/fasteners_torque/index.asp#
just click on the calculator and it will figure the torque for you!
 

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The manual for my 07 states 76 and I have been driving it for three years this way. You overtorque and you will have problems. Maybe they changed something on the 08, but everything else seems identical. Mine are the alloy rims that come with the SR-5, TRD Off Road verizion.
 
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