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A little confused on all this abbreviation stuff. I have a 2006 Tundra DC 4x4. I have not used it to tow much yet, but have the opportunity to buy a real nice camper trailer at a real nice price. The info off of the camper is as follows.
GVWR -- 6430
GAWR FRONT -- 2960
GAWR REAR --2960

GROSS DRY - 4076
HITCH DRY - 510
PAYLOAD 2354

Can anyone tell me what all this means and if my Tundra will safely pull it.
Thanks for your help:ts:
 

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GVWR: Gross Vehicle Weight Rating= absolute TOTAL weight on vehicle(including passengers, fluids, and gear) plus tongue weight of trailer. Basically max weight on tires.

GAWR: Gross Axle Weight rating= Front and rear is self-explanitory

Gross dry: Weight of truck(i assume not trailer) without fluids and passenger. Some manufacturers assume 1 driver of average weight plus the normal fluids but apparently not toyota.

Hitch dry: maximum tongue weight of trailer being applied to trailer hitch. How much weight is the trailer adding to the truck basically.

Payload: how much weight can safely be loaded into the bed or trailer.

I just want to get this straight, these numbers are off the trailer right?? If that's the case then the absolute max weight of the trailer and all it's contents can not exceed 6430lbs, or 2960 per axle. The trailer weights 4076lbs without anything in it. It applies 510lbs to the vehicle towing it. And you can add 2354lbs worth of supplies, food, clothing, or anything else you need.

The curb weight of your truck is about 4765lbs w/a towing capacity of 6900-7200lbs so the trailer is ok. Plus the tongue weight is under the max so that's ok also. I think you should be all set towing this rig. Just remember it's a lot of weight so driver accordingly plus don't forget to change fluids more often due to the added stress and temps.
 

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Ever the explorer
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Tomhole will be along to rock and roll this thread.

The biggy is most units don't advertise the correct actual weight much better to drag it to the scales and weigh every thing each axles etc.
Then put water and fluids in the trailer. water weighs like 8.3lbs a gallon and adds up quick.
So need to get hard data on some of the items to really know where ya stand.
 

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The curb weight of your truck is about 4765lbs w/a towing capacity of 6900-7200lbs so the trailer is ok. Plus the tongue weight is under the max so that's ok also. I think you should be all set towing this rig. Just remember it's a lot of weight so driver accordingly plus don't forget to change fluids more often due to the added stress and temps.
The curb weight of an 06 DC 4X4 is much more than 4,765 lbs. Its more in the 5,200-5,400 lb range
 

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My 2004 Double Cab is only 2 wheel drive, but it is the Limited version with Tow package 17" wheels etc. I weighed my truck with me (255lbs) a full tank of gas (about 150lbs) and came up with a scale reading of 5,220lbs. So, if we subtract the gas and myself, it would indicate a gross weight of 4,815lbs. I know the transfer case and front axle would add to the 4x4 weight, but I'm not sure how much. 400 to 600 extra lbs seems like a little too much, maybe someone has weighed theirs and can contribute.
 

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Pretty sure the 4X4 option adds about 400-500 lbs to the truck.

My owners manual indicates my 05 DC 4X4 has a dry weight in the 5200-5300 range.
 

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Ever the explorer
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Tom musta flown the coop.....Not seen him on in awhile just when we have someone who could use his knowledge.
 

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ICON did a great job. Only correction is that the GROSS DRY weight listed in your original post is the dry weight of the camper with no options or stuff added to it. So, here goes.

If you can weigh the truck and trailer before you buy it, that would be peachy. Then you will be working from actual data. If you can, report back and we'll walk you through the easiest way to get all the important data.

If you can't weigh it, then all this will be a WAG (engineering estimate). If you could provide the make and model of the trailer being considered, that might help get some real world data from the folks on rv.net

Based on what you provided and my experience with trailers, I would guesstimate that your trailer will weigh the following:

Gross Vehicular Weight (weight of entire trailer, including hitch weight, all cargo) = 5,500 lbs

Hitch weight of loaded trailer = 700 lbs (about 12% of 5,500 lbs)

Both of these could be way wrong.

Ok, so lets do some simple math. You will have to participate. Go out and look at the sticker that is on your truck on the door pillar (not the one on the door, the one on the truck). It should say something like "The maximum weight of the passengers and cargo shall not exceed X,XXX lbs" Mine says 1661 lbs. I thought all these stickers were non-specific, but as it turns out, this particular one IS specific to YOUR truck (at least that's what I've been told). Anyway, mine is spot on correct (I weighed my truck). Now we can do some math.

Ok, take that weight and subtract it from 6600 lbs (the GVWR of your Tundra). This should be a good estimate of what your truck weighs with NOTHING in it. This is what we will use for the following calculations:

11,800 GCWR (Gross Combined Weight Rating of your Tundra. This is the max that the truck and trailer with all stuff in them can weigh)
- actual weight of empty truck
- all the stuff you plan to have in the truck while towing
= max GVW of trailer

6600 lbs GVWR of your Tundra (max your Tundra can weigh)
- actual weight of empty truck
- all the stuff you plan to have in the truck while towing
= max hitch weight of trailer

Substitute in your numbers and see how that compares to the estimated weights I listed above for the trailer you are looking at.

If you aren't going to put a lot of weight in the Tundra while towing, you should be fine with that trailer. If you plan to tow at high altitudes in mountains, you will be disappointed with the towing performance, even if you are within your weight limits.

But, the best method is to actually weigh the truck and trailer. Please give that due consideration.

Tom

Here's an example I provide of the weights I am towing:

11,800 lbs (GCWR of my truck)
- 5000 lbs (actual empty weight of my truck. I weighed it.)
- 500 lbs of water bags (me, wife, 2 kids, 2 dogs)
- 500 lbs cargo (wood, genset, bikes, etc...)
= 5,800 lbs (max weight of trailer I can pull, spec says 6,800 lbs max tow rating)

My trailer weighs 5200 lbs, loaded (I weighed it, several times) I'm good here.

6600 lbs (GVWR of my truck)
- 5000 lbs (empty weight of my truck)
- 500 lbs of water bags
- 500 lbs of cargo
= 600 lbs left over This is the max hitch weight I can handle

My hitch weight is actually 680 lbs. Oops, I'm over weight. Not really. My weight distribution hitch puts that excess 80 lbs back on the trailer axles.

Hope this helps.
 
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