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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How are the front suspension LCA rear bushings pressed in? I have a 2004 2WD Limited.

Both the front and rear bushings are similar in that one end consists of a plate on the outside, a slight gap, some rubber (actually part of the inner absorber material) connected to a flange. The flange is the part that when the bushing is pressed in, contacts against the LCA tube.

The lower LCA front bushing was easy to press in. The press sleeves I had fit over the end plate, contacting the flange that's pressed up against the LCA tube (I hope that makes sense).

Unfortunately, the LCA rear bushing plate and flange are the exact same size. There's no way a sleeve can get past the outside plate to contact the flange. Am I supposed to just press against the outside plate? This severely pushes the plate against the rubber below it, a sight which has me completely convinced I'm doing something wrong. Is there some special tool used between the end plate and the flange which fills the gap during the pressing process?

I'm worried I'm damaging the bushing by pressing so hard on the outside plate. After getting the bushing in about halfway, it became very hard to move. A friend suggested I put some grease on the bushing but I saw none on the old bushing after pressing it out. Short on time, I actually completed the job by heating up the LCA tube with a torch. This seemed to expand the tube enough to get the bushing to move. Looking at it later, it's not the kind of work I take pride in doing. I have no idea if the bushing was damaged by the heat (it was already in about halfway when I heated up the LCA tube).

Anyone willing to set me straight on this process? I'd appreciate it.

-Grub
 

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My mechanic changed out both LCAs with factory new ones that had the bushings already pressed in. Seems to be the best route. My old LCAs were damaged and looked as if the old owner used a hammer to try to get new bushings on the LCAs. The old LCAs had hammer marks all around the metal housing area near the bushings. New LCAs are about 350 each so not a huge dent in the wallet. I havent heard any real success stories of getting those bushings pressed OUT without it being a huge PITA.


How are the front suspension LCA rear bushings pressed in? I have a 2004 2WD Limited.

Both the front and rear bushings are similar in that one end consists of a plate on the outside, a slight gap, some rubber (actually part of the inner absorber material) connected to a flange. The flange is the part that when the bushing is pressed in, contacts against the LCA tube.

The lower LCA front bushing was easy to press in. The press sleeves I had fit over the end plate, contacting the flange that's pressed up against the LCA tube (I hope that makes sense).

Unfortunately, the LCA rear bushing plate and flange are the exact same size. There's no way a sleeve can get past the outside plate to contact the flange. Am I supposed to just press against the outside plate? This severely pushes the plate against the rubber below it, a sight which has me completely convinced I'm doing something wrong. Is there some special tool used between the end plate and the flange which fills the gap during the pressing process?

I'm worried I'm damaging the bushing by pressing so hard on the outside plate. After getting the bushing in about halfway, it became very hard to move. A friend suggested I put some grease on the bushing but I saw none on the old bushing after pressing it out. Short on time, I actually completed the job by heating up the LCA tube with a torch. This seemed to expand the tube enough to get the bushing to move. Looking at it later, it's not the kind of work I take pride in doing. I have no idea if the bushing was damaged by the heat (it was already in about halfway when I heated up the LCA tube).

Anyone willing to set me straight on this process? I'd appreciate it.

-Grub
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks for the response Chandler.
I'm ok with the PITA aspect. I'm not a mechanic so I've come to accept all auto work as a PITA, which occasionally requires blood sacrifice to keep the Gods happy.

So far, I've done both UCA's without problems. Those bushings were similar to the LCA front bushing, where the press sleeve was able to contact the flange.
I don't have a hydraulic press, although I do dream about having one. I'm using a cheap press and pull set with the threaded spindles. As long as I can get the sleeves over the bushing, it works just fine with enough elbow grease.
There is a bit of hammering to be done but only to get the bushings out. It doesn't risk damaging the CA itself if done correctly. To get the press set to work correctly, you must have something to press against. The only way to remove the existing bushing is to get a bearing splitter between the bushing and the CA. Using a hammer and chisel, the bushing flange has to be bent away on opposite sides of the CA, where the bearing splitter will be placed. A bit of paint might be sacrificed but the CA itself should not be damaged. Once I figured out what I was doing, I've had no problem removing any of the bushings.

While the CAs are not going to bankrupt me, the bushings are only about $24 apiece. That's much cheaper than replacing the entire CA, especially attractive if there's no previous damage to the CA.
I'm still hoping someone with actual experience installing these bushing might chime in. I'm almost willing to beg at this point. The tires need to be replaced quickly and I'd like to hold off until the bushings are replaced. I want to get the front end aligned at that point.
Thanks again!
 

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I haven't done them on a Tundra but every other bushing I've done has worked well by putting them in the freezer overnight and greasing the sleeves before install.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Three out of the four (on each side) bushings were a breeze to get out and in using the press sleeves. It's just that one...
There's a fair amount of effort involved to get to the point where the bushings can be removed/installed. Nothing anyone couldn't do though, assuming they have the strength to turn a wrench and hold up the brake caliper while tying it up.

I'll be giving the other side a try in the next week. The freezing and grease should help. I'm just hoping it doesn't damage the elastic material inside the bushing.
Thanks again.
 

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I just watched some Youtube videos on tacoma truck LCA bushings which i assume are similar to the Tundra/Sequoia. It seems that the hard part is getting the bushings out. Seemed that just about everyone on Youtube used a torch to heat the metal housing around the bushing which made the rubber melt enough to be pressed out. There's a few press methods on Youtube. The old metal sleeve was kept in place and a new bushing was not too difficult to press in.



I assumed the metal sleeve had to be changed(the most difficult part) with the bushing but youtube shows otherwise!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey Chandler1323,
I watched a few of those videos. Some were better than others.
I watched one buy use a bottle jack between each leg of the CA, pushing the bushings out. Later, I saw posters telling him he was probably bending the CA. Ok, I'll pass on that method.
I watched several burn out the rubber, as you mentioned. Not having ever actually seen a bushing before, I was really hoping I wouldn't have to go there. That they had to reuse the shell of the previous bushing really confused me. It turns out, the replacements for our vehicles, at least the Moog bushings I purchased, have the shell. The absorber material in the middle is fused (?) to the shell. Having pushed a few in now, I can guarantee there's no way you could get what I purchased to press inside of the existing shell, should you choose to melt out the middle.
I watched a couple of guys drill out the absorber portion of the bushing. Nah.

The OEM bushing I pushed out was identical to the Moog replacement. I'm sure some day, I'll see a bushing replacement job that requires saving the old shell. I can't imagine how the bushing is built that would require that.

The best thing I've done so far, is to purchase an inexpensive pull and press sleeve set for about $100. Even using the spindles (threaded rods) that come with it, rather than a hydraulic press, made what I've done so far much easier. Granted, I'm whining about not being able to get the last bushing in but I don't really consider that the fault of the sleeve set. That set should be very handle later with other jobs too.

I've decided I'm going to do four things when I press in the last bushings.
1) Freeze the bushing overnight, prior to installation.
2) Put some grease on the portion of the bushing nearest the flange. That's the portion that really resists insertion. I may put some on the CA, I haven't decided yet.
3) cut out another piece of aluminum plate to put between the bushing end plate and the rubber. That gap really bothers me and I want to avoid overstressing the rubber.
I figure if I fill the gap, the stress will be distributed more evenly to the edge of the bushing, not along the center, where the bolt inserts.
4) Heat up the CA tube just prior to insertion. I'm not sure how that's going to work with the grease though. Heating up the tube was the only thing that got the first bushing to go in.

One of my kids dropped a bushing and bent the end plate. I'm waiting for a replacement. I'll probably get around to this job next week sometime.

-Grub
 
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