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Hey all,

New to the forum. Looking to purchase a used 2nd Gen Toyota Tundra. I already own a commuter car, so the truck will be for road trips and towing mostly. I live in SoCal, so the climate is pretty car friendly.

Is purchasing 2nd Gen Tundra with 200,000 or more miles a safe and reliable purchase for my usage or should I be looking for something with less miles?

Thanks
 

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If it's the 4.7 it will last forever, can't say on the 4.6 or 5.7, they could last , but waiting for the test of time.
 

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Apparently they seem to last ok.

 

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Ask for maintenance records if the seller has them. If there is no documented timing belt/water pump change I would plan on doing that. You may get it opened up and see it didn't need replacement. The parts including new coolant are about $200 dollars and after you go through all the effort of taking it apart just change out the parts. Then you have a correct date and mileage for the new timing belt. There is lots of info on this site about the task. There is also a way to remove a cam cover to check the condition of the belt. But I would rather do the job than guess that everything is OK... Chap
 

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I purchased my 2007 5.7 when it had 270,000 original miles and zero maintenance records, it now has about 293,000 and the only unplanned expense was when the fuel pump went out.
 

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Is that Zero maintenance records because PO is hiding the fact he had to replace timing chain? Or maybe your one of the lucky ones.
 

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Is that Zero maintenance records because PO is hiding the fact he had to replace timing chain? Or maybe your one of the lucky ones.
I have no idea, but I do know that I am the 4th owner and that the Carfax report is clean. Toyota's web site shows one service after the sale, and that was a TSB concerning the radio.

I consider myself lucky thus far.
 

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I was tempted for a 5.7, but then again I asked myself, do I need it? If I was pulling anything bigger than my 4.7 could handle, yes I would of given it a try. I just see timing chain problems once in awhile, so made me wonder. That and valve cover leaks is all I've heard of so far. I dont like the fact of how long they made that chain, and I'm not sure how it's made, but is it a true roller double chain? If not, then that is not the Japanese technology I'm use to seeing. Why, when the timing belt has been working fine all these years. Honda went back to a chain, and nothing but problems.
 

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I was tempted for a 5.7, but then again I asked myself, do I need it? If I was pulling anything bigger than my 4.7 could handle, yes I would of given it a try. I just see timing chain problems once in awhile, so made me wonder. That and valve cover leaks is all I've heard of so far. I dont like the fact of how long they made that chain, and I'm not sure how it's made, but is it a true roller double chain? If not, then that is not the Japanese technology I'm use to seeing. Why, when the timing belt has been working fine all these years. Honda went back to a chain, and nothing but problems.
Because customers did nothing but complain about it when they neglected maintenance and the belt snapped. There’s nothing wrong with a belt, there’s something wrong with people. I love my 4.7, belt and all. People think timing chains are perfect and require no maintenance, which is inaccurate.


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The chains on the 5.7L rarely if ever need to be serviced or changed, they have no required maintenance except for oil changes. I also love my '02 4.7L, but the expense of changing the T-belt does have to figured into the cost of ownership... if I could squeeze a 5.7L into my 2002, I would be even happier.
 

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There is never really any maintenance required for a chain. Changing the oil is more critical because the chain relies on the lubrication. Ask the guys at Honda about the engines with chains. If you don't change the oil when you are suppose to it will put stress on the chain and it will stretch causing a Cam sensor code. You have to replace it in order to erase the codes, so you can pass inspection. The only chain I have seen last forever is on the old Datsun L engines. It's a true roller double chain that's why. But still the chain guides wear out, but after 200k. Not saying anything bad about the 5.7, just sittin back and watching it seeing how it does with time. I like the thought of even more power from Toyota, but theoretically in my case, Why? The only thing I have to pull is a big boat a mile down the road, but I'm not even there with that yet. So far the only time it sees water is when it rains. Timing belt is $200 in parts for me, a little time down, and 90k down the road is a long time. I'll stick with the million mile engine for now.
 

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Hey all,

New to the forum. Looking to purchase a used 2nd Gen Toyota Tundra. I already own a commuter car, so the truck will be for road trips and towing mostly. I live in SoCal, so the climate is pretty car friendly.

Is purchasing 2nd Gen Tundra with 200,000 or more miles a safe and reliable purchase for my usage or should I be looking for something with less miles?

Thanks
Ask for maintenance records if the seller has them. If there is no documented timing belt/water pump change I would plan on doing that. You may get it opened up and see it didn't need replacement. The parts including new coolant are about $200 dollars and after you go through all the effort of taking it apart just change out the parts. Then you have a correct date and mileage for the new timing belt. There is lots of info on this site about the task. There is also a way to remove a cam cover to check the condition of the belt. But I would rather do the job than guess that everything is OK... Chap
We moved from California to Tennessee pulling our 25ft. travel trailer With our 2008 SR5 with 350,000 miles on her. Did all the maintenance and ran like a champ. Traded her in for a new Limited. Only had to change the water pump and the mechanic checked everything else before our move. Great truck.
 
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