Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Like you have read in previous posts, I am getting ready to trade in my 2003 Tacoma doublecab for another Tundra. My Tacoma is currently white and I like the way it looks but over the years it has developed rust speckles all over it. It makes a sharp looking truck look like sh*t. I've had body men refer to it as rail dust which is from the brakes on rail cars while the trucks are in transport.. I also had another body shop tell me that its filings from snowplow cutting edges that my wide tires kick up onto the side of the truck. The trn react with the road salt and form these rust specks. That theory does make sense because they are more present behind the tires.
With that said, I have narrowed my color choices for my new Tundra down to two choices, slate and silver. Does anyone have any of these rust speckles show up on you silver trucks or is this just on white. I will have wider tires on my new Tundra but plan to switch back to stock for the winter. Any input would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,461 Posts
rail dust is really a generic term to explain it. usually it occurs with the train transport. but theres other factors that do it too..brake dust, metal shavings airborne etc. just use a clay bar and it'll get rid of them. it is more obvious on white but it happens on any color..just shows up more on white. run your hand over a clay bar'd surface vs a non clay bar surface and you will feel the difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
This isn't my info, just thought it was pertinent to your question.

What looks like rust spots on white paint - Autopia.org

It has some discussion on fallout, clay and another multi-step product used as a decontamination wash/system. There's a link to an older thread as well that discusses it too.

Yes, silver colors do get fallout and if left alone long enough can turn rust colored. Clay will shear the top portion off and sometimes pull the entire IFO out of the surface of the vehicle. it's an easy, cost efficient and pretty effective way of removing the "spots." As mentioned in the linked thread, the spots can possibly return later, which could mean either new IFO particles or that the clay isn't strong enough to pull them out completely and you might want to consider the decon wash system.

1) Knead the clay a lot. Keep a fresh looking surface on the vehicle finish.
2) Don't use it on the paint if you drop the clay on the ground. The potential for scratching after the clay has been dropped is very high.
3) Break the clay up into smaller, more manageable pieces. If you drop one, put it away for use on something else and get a new piece.
4) Use plenty of clay lube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
I gave my truck its first wash after the winter and I have this all over my truck. I'm going to pick up a clay bar and give it a shot.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top