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Are the '06 & newer Rav4's "AWD" or "4WD"....?
I keep hearing this term Viscous......wondering if that applies to these newer Rav4s, in other words how exactly does the AWD system work on these? I'm assumming by now it is proven in snow, icy conditions, wet highways, etc...?

Is the design similar to say a Subaru Forester....? Subaru tends to really focus in their marketing on their AWD capability, and i'm wondering how these '06 & '07 Rav4s stack up against them. The RAV4s appear to be priced more for our budget.

Thanks very much
 

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..Toyota's website lists the Rav as being equipped with either "Front engine front-wheel drive or Electronic On-Demand 4-wheel drive (4WD)". Viscous refers to the gears of the system being lubricated with liquid material; you usually hear "Viscous Limited-Slip Differential" or something similar. Basically, the Rav has a real 4wd system, when you push the button it locks the system to direct torque to all four wheels depending on traction needs. It doesn't include a low range, so it's not your pick for heavy rock climbing. But the system with a decent set of tires should be more than enough for common folks' snow and icey/wet highway needs.

Subaru operates alittle differently. Their systems are permanent all wheel drive; all the time power is being sent to all four wheels (unlike the Rav--which is either front wheel drive or 4 wheel drive), and the system cannot be deactivated. Also unlike the Rav's system, AWD is always on and won't hurt the car at highway speed. Leave a 4wd system on at 70 mph and you can say goodbye to the transmission...thats why 4wd Lock on the Rav only stays on below 23 mph...I think it's a number like that.

I hope this is slightly clearer than mud! If you're confused or anything just ask!
 

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..Toyota's website lists the Rav as being equipped with either "Front engine front-wheel drive or Electronic On-Demand 4-wheel drive (4WD)". Viscous refers to the gears of the system being lubricated with liquid material; you usually hear "Viscous Limited-Slip Differential" or something similar. Basically, the Rav has a real 4wd system, when you push the button it locks the system to direct torque to all four wheels depending on traction needs. It doesn't include a low range, so it's not your pick for heavy rock climbing. But the system with a decent set of tires should be more than enough for common folks' snow and icey/wet highway needs.

Subaru operates alittle differently. Their systems are permanent all wheel drive; all the time power is being sent to all four wheels (unlike the Rav--which is either front wheel drive or 4 wheel drive), and the system cannot be deactivated. Also unlike the Rav's system, AWD is always on and won't hurt the car at highway speed. Leave a 4wd system on at 70 mph and you can say goodbye to the transmission...thats why 4wd Lock on the Rav only stays on below 23 mph...I think it's a number like that.

I hope this is slightly clearer than mud! If you're confused or anything just ask!
Great post, good info!
 

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AWD/4WD seem to mean different things to different people, but the RAV4 is AWD to me. Power IS sent to all four wheels at all times, according to Toyota's description of the system; the 'Lock' feature just sends maximum torque rearwards under 25 mph, instead of letting the computer decide the torque mix. The "4WD" system description in the RAV4 New Car Features Guide is a good reference.
 

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AWD/4WD seem to mean different things to different people, but the RAV4 is AWD to me. Power IS sent to all four wheels at all times, according to Toyota's description of the system; the 'Lock' feature just sends maximum torque rearwards under 25 mph, instead of letting the computer decide the torque mix. The "4WD" system description in the RAV4 New Car Features Guide is a good reference.
Actually youre right....if you buy the Rav with 4wd then it is, in esscence, AWD..all 4 wheels get power. I was thinking of the FWD model in which, of course, only the front wheels are driving.

I'm only trying to help...sorry if things aren't 120% accurate.
 

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As is typical, you can believe only 1% of what you read in these forums. We need facts here, NOT opinions stated as facts. TT2591 is incorrect on many points. Your apologies are a bit late if someone is making a purchase decision based on your perported expertize. But, as always to the reader - 'Let the reader bewary'(sic)!

Changing subject- My 2005, 5M AWD BASE is: all-time awd w/ viscous coupling, very similar to a subaru except for the inefficient 90degree power diversion to the rear on the Toy (just look at the crappy tire wear!). This is the CHEAPEST, "hyundiaesqe" system to implement. Look up viscous coupling in WIKIPEDIA for more info.
Ole Grumpy -
ex: Foreign Auto Tech and Detroit race engine builder; NIASE master tech patch; BSME.
 

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Hey Grumpy I'm with you, AWD is what it says, power is delivered to all the wheels all the time. Slipping has to occur to make up for turning or simple tire wear. This is done using viscous coupling between front set of wheels and rears. The early RAV4's used a system like a differential instead of a viscous coupling. 4WD has all the mechanicals locked together, that's why in a turn your front wheels are travelling a wider circle than your back wheels, causing binding also the same when driving with different sized tires. Now I'm not an engineer, this is just the way I understand it.:cool:
 
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