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Discussion Starter #1
I recently replaced the (severely blown) rear shocks. Looking around back there, it's clear all four lower control arms and the lateral rod are factory original from 2004 and 261k miles ago. Has anyone ever replaced all of those bushings? By my count there would be...10 total? Does anyone even make replacement bushings? I know you can buy replacement arms with bushings, but that seems like a bit much...
 

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2005 Toyota Sequoia Limited
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You can't buy just the bushings. Aftermarket replacement arms with bushings are around $40-60. I have a price out for an entire bushing replacement for the 1st Gen and it's around $1500....
 

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2005 Toyota Sequoia Limited
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Great, thanks for sharing. The rear suspension on my sequoia is shot too. I was wondering the same as the OP.

Did you end up replacing all the arms? How much better/smoother was your ride?
Im at 156k right now, things are still good, bushings are all in pretty good shape still.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was afraid of this...I know I needed to do sway bar links and bushings (front and rear), and I did inner and outer tie rods. The front control arms looked fine (mostly because the ball joints are fine and I don't notice any obvious clunking. The front end feels tight now, but the rear end just feels...loose. It's hard to visually inspect those links, since they are bracketed so heavily. Maybe I'll just swap them one link a week or something and see how it improves...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So I'm going to replace all the rear arms with aftermarket stuff (MOOG), and I'm going to order a genuine Toyota rear lateral control rod assembly. It seems like that will run me about $400 total. At least then I'll know that any looseness or other instability back there has a different source. When they wear, I'll get front UCAs that give me a bit more camber/caster adjustment, and I'll replace the front LCAs and the eccentrics (one side is frozen) so I can get it aligned perfect.
 

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So I'm going to replace all the rear arms with aftermarket stuff (MOOG), and I'm going to order a genuine Toyota rear lateral control rod assembly. It seems like that will run me about $400 total. At least then I'll know that any looseness or other instability back there has a different source. When they wear, I'll get front UCAs that give me a bit more camber/caster adjustment, and I'll replace the front LCAs and the eccentrics (one side is frozen) so I can get it aligned perfect.
While I think that you'll definitely see an improvement from replacing all of these items the biggest change in ride quality on my high mileage Sequoia came from replacing the rear wheel bearings. At 261k, they could definitely be bad on yours. Made for a rough ride that came from the back, especially above 50 or 60 mph. We got killer MPG because couldn't really drive above 65 or 70 comfortably.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
While I think that you'll definitely see an improvement from replacing all of these items the biggest change in ride quality on my high mileage Sequoia came from replacing the rear wheel bearings. At 261k, they could definitely be bad on yours. Made for a rough ride that came from the back, especially above 50 or 60 mph. We got killer MPG because couldn't really drive above 65 or 70 comfortably.
How big of a job is this? I’m a shade tree type, so if it involves a press or some more complex tools that could be an issue for me...
 

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While I think that you'll definitely see an improvement from replacing all of these items the biggest change in ride quality on my high mileage Sequoia came from replacing the rear wheel bearings. At 261k, they could definitely be bad on yours. Made for a rough ride that came from the back, especially above 50 or 60 mph. We got killer MPG because couldn't really drive above 65 or 70 comfortably.
Can you provide more info of said "rough ride that came from the back"? What were you feeling/hearing? What happened above 50 or 60mph? Jarring/bumpy ride over bumps?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Can you provide more info of said "rough ride that came from the back"? What were you feeling/hearing? What happened above 50 or 60mph? Jarring/bumpy ride over bumps?
At least in my case, driving on a very good road is extremely smooth and controlled. It's when it gets bumpy or rough that the entire rear suspension seems to have a lot of...give. You can tell the new shocks made a ton of difference, but it's almost like there's just a bunch of slop in other places that it's struggling to make up for. I think having the factory shocks on it for 16 years/261k in the back contributed greatly to the bushings wearing out - those rubber bits were absorbing a lot of the bumps/jolts/etc that normally the shocks would handle.

I don't know if this is relevant, but I can slide myself under the vehicle the back, grab the tow hitch with my hands, and very easily bounce the rear end up and down. It takes almost no effort. The shocks in the back are brand new, so I know it's not that. So here's what I'm going to put in over the next two weeks;

Rear Lower Control Arms
Rear Upper Control Arms
Rear Sway Bar Bushings
Rear Sway Bar Links
Rear Lateral Rod/Panhard bar

I'll report back with the results!
 

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At least in my case, driving on a very good road is extremely smooth and controlled. It's when it gets bumpy or rough that the entire rear suspension seems to have a lot of...give. You can tell the new shocks made a ton of difference, but it's almost like there's just a bunch of slop in other places that it's struggling to make up for. I think having the factory shocks on it for 16 years/261k in the back contributed greatly to the bushings wearing out - those rubber bits were absorbing a lot of the bumps/jolts/etc that normally the shocks would handle.

I don't know if this is relevant, but I can slide myself under the vehicle the back, grab the tow hitch with my hands, and very easily bounce the rear end up and down. It takes almost no effort. The shocks in the back are brand new, so I know it's not that. So here's what I'm going to put in over the next two weeks;

Rear Lower Control Arms
Rear Upper Control Arms
Rear Sway Bar Bushings
Rear Sway Bar Links
Rear Lateral Rod/Panhard bar

I'll report back with the results!
Nice, mine is the same way. My shocks are blown so I've got new ones coming but my issues were always there even before the shocks blew.

I bought all moog rear suspension parts and these:


I will also report once everything arrives and is installed. I've also got OME 862 springs in the back on airbags.


Earlier this month I took an offroad loose gravel trail to a lake and my rear end was all over the place, if I wasn't super careful the rear end would completely fishtail out. Thankfully I was not hauling a trailer.
 

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It is quite a job to do the bearings. I honestly didn't understand the concept of how Toyota's rear bearings work until I took them apart. Plus, I had to fabricate a tool to press the bearings on and off the axle shaft. Even DIY it still probably cost me $500 after parts and other small items. The bearings are not cheap. That being said, I was quoted like $1500-$2000 to do the job by a few local shops. I assume those were "go away" prices. I posted some information and pictures previously, if you want to look them up to get an idea.

The truck felt kind of loose at high speeds. It almost felt like it was bouncing around in the body. Especially when giving throttle while running at highway speeds. We could be rolling along at 65 but when I'd hit the pedal hard enough to downshift and accelerate, it felt like things might shake apart a bit. The most obvious thing I saw was my passenger seat arm rest shaking so much that it looked like it might break off. Probably going up and down 3 or 4 inches. That was at highway speeds. The odd thing was that on certain roads, it would be smooth. Generally, I could go 80 no problem on smooth concrete roads but anything above 65 felt like a bad idea on asphalt. It also seemed to feel more planted and smooth when I had a bit of weight on a trailer behind it.

I have a theory that most of the high mileage Toyota trucks have bad rear bearings and people just live with it. I've met a number of people with 250k+ Tacomas and 4runners who experience the same symptoms that I've described.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Does anyone have the torque specs for the following parts of the rear suspension:

Rear Sway Bar Bushing Bracket-to-Frame
Rear Sway Bar End Links
Rear Lower Control Arm
Rear Upper Control Arm
Rear Lateral Rod (Panhard bar)

I've searched and found the specs for the front end, but the back end seems to elude me. If I'm replacing all this stuff, I want to make sure I bolt it back in with the correct specs!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Done! I replaced all the above parts last weekend. Some came out...easier than others. The rear upper control arms took a lot of PB Blaster, hammering with the impact gun, and in the end a breaker bar with a pipe attached. The rear sway bar end links were so badly rusted/stuck that I had to break out the Sawzall and cut the ends off 3 out of 4 attachments points. After all that, the rear is MUCH more solid. None of the bushings were obviously trashed, but they were all the factory original ones that had 260k on them.

The rear end feels much less...loose? It seems like the suspension controls bumps/uneven pavement/road defects a lot better now. Next weekend I'm going to get under it again and re-torque everything to spec again, but I'm pleased with the results for the $$!
 

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Done! I replaced all the above parts last weekend. Some came out...easier than others. The rear upper control arms took a lot of PB Blaster, hammering with the impact gun, and in the end a breaker bar with a pipe attached. The rear sway bar end links were so badly rusted/stuck that I had to break out the Sawzall and cut the ends off 3 out of 4 attachments points. After all that, the rear is MUCH more solid. None of the bushings were obviously trashed, but they were all the factory original ones that had 260k on them.

The rear end feels much less...loose? It seems like the suspension controls bumps/uneven pavement/road defects a lot better now. Next weekend I'm going to get under it again and re-torque everything to spec again, but I'm pleased with the results for the $$!
Nice one! I got the entire rear replaced minus the lateral rod since I ordered the wrong part. Can't wait to get the car back.

Will also report too.
 
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