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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone had the plug-in head (the thing with the electrical prongs on it) snap off the power cord that goes to their block heater? I'm in the middle of some pretty cold weather, and right when I need it most, the silly thing snapped right off! In reading through other post with pictures about how to replace a block heater, I noticed that the electrical cord seems to be hard wired or soldered right onto the heater unit - you can't just buy a new cord and plug it into a receptacle on the heater, like you could on my old VW Golf. So is there any way to neatly and safely splice a new prong ending onto the existing cord? (BTW, I have a 2008 5.7 litre Tundra, if that makes any difference).
 

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Let's try to be a little more specific. Which end of the power cord snapped off?
The end that plugs into a power outlet, or the end that plugs into the block heater?

Steve
 

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Let's try to be a little more specific. Which end of the power cord snapped off?
The end that plugs into a power outlet, or the end that plugs into the block heater?

Steve
can't be much more specific, steve. just read.


Has anyone had the plug-in head (the thing with the electrical prongs on it) snap off the power cord that goes to their block heater? I'm in the middle of some pretty cold weather, and right when I need it most, the silly thing snapped right off! In reading through other post with pictures about how to replace a block heater, I noticed that the electrical cord seems to be hard wired or soldered right onto the heater unit - you can't just buy a new cord and plug it into a receptacle on the heater, like you could on my old VW Golf. So is there any way to neatly and safely splice a new prong ending onto the existing cord? (BTW, I have a 2008 5.7 litre Tundra, if that makes any difference).

Just run to home depot and get a new plug. They make them that you unscrew the two halves, and put the cord in there with the ends stripped or sometimes the cover just pierces it when you reassemble it. lots of ones out there at hardware stores, no splicing, just cut the old one off and install the new one...some dont come apart in halves but the end comes off etc...just take a gander at them. here's a couple via google



 

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can't be much more specific, steve. just read.





Just run to home depot and get a new plug. They make them that you unscrew the two halves, and put the cord in there with the ends stripped or sometimes the cover just pierces it when you reassemble it. lots of ones out there at hardware stores, no splicing, just cut the old one off and install the new one...some dont come apart in halves but the end comes off etc...just take a gander at them. here's a couple via google




Yeah, I had to do the similar thing when I winterized my car. Real easy process. If you have mulitmeter, can come in handy to check continuity.

Barney, how do you post the pics like that when replying/creating threads. I like to post on here quite often and have not been able to figure out how. Thanks.
 

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You have to use the IMG function.

Put the photo URL in between the brackets like this:



.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you to everyone who replied. The solution Barney proposed is certainly a workable alternative. But I was hoping to attach a similarly sized and shaped plug end on the cord so it will fit into the little plug holder cap when not in use, preventing it from flapping around in the wind as I drive which would eventually wear away at the surrounding surfaces.

I suppose I could buy another electrical cord with the same sized prong-end on it and cut it off a couple of feet from the end then cut my existing cord back a little ways and then strip the wires on both cords and twist the matching wires together then finish off with several wraps of electrical tape.... Does that sound like it might be safe enough and not likely to short-out? Would such a connection be likely to impede the current to the block heater?
 

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You could do that but if you do make sure you use something automotive grade. Don't just twist them together and tape them.
 

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can't be much more specific, steve. just read
Well. Since he used that highly technical term "the thing with the electrical prongs on it," and since I believe the end that plugs into the heater has "prongs" as well, I figured the question was reasonable.

Steve
 

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Well. Since he used that highly technical term "the thing with the electrical prongs on it," and since I believe the end that plugs into the heater has "prongs" as well, I figured the question was reasonable.

Steve
well i was just referring to the fact he said the other end was soldered or hardwired into the heater....that points to the other end for sure.

now, if steve is right and it does in deed plug right in, that should be an easy fix. just get a new cord. call sparks toyota and ask if the cord itself is replaceable.

and sorry, i dont have one and didnt think about it needing to be a certain size to fit someplace...so that big yeller thing might be bad haha. good luck. be sure to post up if the cord is replaceable so others can read it here if they do a search later..
 

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well i was just referring to the fact he said the other end was soldered or hardwired into the heater....that points to the other end for sure.

now, if steve is right and it does in deed plug right in, that should be an easy fix. just get a new cord. call sparks toyota and ask if the cord itself is replaceable.

and sorry, i dont have one and didnt think about it needing to be a certain size to fit someplace...so that big yeller thing might be bad haha. good luck. be sure to post up if the cord is replaceable so others can read it here if they do a search later..
Hey guys, Stevj's question is warranted. I just put one in and the cable is seperate,it does plug into the heating element, not hardwired. Unless mine is different, but if you reread the DIY, it is suggested to drop the cable down first then plug into the element before install, as people have mentioned how difficult it is to plug in after the install. As I can attest to.
 

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Apologies all around.
I was away on a road trip and memory failed me. Had to get home to the one in my garage (waiting for install) to verify the configuration. Took a photo.
The power cord is a female end where it plugs into the heater, and the heater has shrouded pins. So, of course, Meerkat was refering to the AC plug end.
Sorry about that.
Click on the picture below for a close-up.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks so much, Guys, for all the feedback. I was making assumptions about the cord being hard-wired to the heater based on the pictures I could find. But after reading your comments, I called my dealership and they told me I could order just the replacement cord for about $35 (CDN). So I ordered one and I'll let you know if it fits and how the installation went. Thanks StevJ for the heads-up on dropping the cord through FIRST to make connecting it easier. Probably your tip will save me some grief.

UPDATE: I dropped the orange end of the replacement block heater cord down behind the engine then dragged myself under my truck with the expectation that I would just unplug the old cord and plug in the new cord. Turned out that I couldn't even fit my medium-sized female hand into the tiny space far enough that I could get a grip on the old cord to disconnect it from the heating element. I tried every angle. I honestly can't imagine how all the people on the DIY block heater post managed to get the job done unless they all had very dainty hands with 10 inch long fingers. Maybe I'll get some of those portable ramp things so I can drive my truck up on them and thereby gain some working room. If anyone has any suggestions, I'd be happy to hear from you.

UPDATE #2: Took another stab at it today and finally found an angle where I could get 3 fingers sort-of close to where the orange rubber end plugs into the heater element and with the help of a screwdriver, I wedged it out. My hubby then patiently raised and lowered and swivelled the new cord from above the engine until it was at just the right angle then I tapped it with a screwdriver and it went in. It took a lot of tries to get it right though. I can't imagine the mechanics at the dealership fiddleing around like that - there must be some trick to how they do it. Anyway, I hope this post is helpful to anyone else who needs to replace a block heater cord on their 2008 5.7 litre Tundra 4x4. You might want to also check out a thread by "RONE" about how he did his block heater installation - He has very, very good pictures, although they make it look like you have a lot more room to work.
 
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