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Political Affiliation, if Any?

  • Republican

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Democrat

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Libertarian

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • TundraBay is a Turnip

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1
1 - 20 of 53 Posts

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Don't argue with an insomniac.
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm interested in a snapshot of TSOT visitors. Not intending to start a debate on the relative merits of various political directions, so leave the attacks against others out of it. If you want to post what you see as the positive aspects of whichever direction you vote, feel free but please don't characterize any alternate ideas or I doubt this thread will last very long.
 

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I voted republican, but i am a conservative first!!
 

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Premium Member
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I voted "other" as I am officially unenrolled, or whatever it is they call it. I've voted both
parties in the past, but honestly I vote mostly Democrat. And I also don't think you're
a turnip.

John
 

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In college as a political science major, I took a couple of "tests" that determined political leanings, and a few internet quizzes since that time, and I come out consistently "libertarian." Why fight the label?
 

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In college as a political science major, I took a couple of "tests" that determined political leanings, and a few internet quizzes since that time, and I come out consistently "libertarian." Why fight the label?
Yes, but why won't people vote the Libertarian vote. As a PoliSci major you must have an answer why the Democrats and Republicans have a death grip on the voters despite people being completely disgusted with both parties.
 

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Don't argue with an insomniac.
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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, but why won't people vote the Libertarian vote. As a PoliSci major you must have an answer why the Democrats and Republicans have a death grip on the voters despite people being completely disgusted with both parties.
I think I can answer that. Each party has a base of non-thinkers, who will always vote along the party line. Also, each has a very active media wing, which lives to stoke the fires of fear of what the other party will do, to destroy the country. Many people completely believe it. So although they may also feel some disgust with their own chosen party, there's no way in hell they'll let the other guy win.

Who have the good Libertarian candidates been in recent elections? Answer: none. Independents have swung at the ball though.

Look what happened in 2000, when a significant proportion of the Democratic base voted for Nader. Or when Ross Perot took away the vote from some Republicans in 1992. People remember very little, but they remember that stuff.
 

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In college as a political science major, I took a couple of "tests" that determined political leanings, and a few internet quizzes since that time, and I come out consistently "libertarian." Why fight the label?
So you like boys and girls equally?
 

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I would consider myself a small l libertarian. The reason the big L Libertarians can't make it as a competitive party is that they don't understand the game. Politics is a game of compromise and big L's can't bring themselves to do that. They would rather lose everything than sacrifice their principles on anything, and so that's what they do, lose everything.
 

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I think I can answer that. Each party has a base of non-thinkers, who will always vote along the party line. Also, each has a very active media wing, which lives to stoke the fires of fear of what the other party will do, to destroy the country. Many people completely believe it. So although they may also feel some disgust with their own chosen party, there's no way in hell they'll let the other guy win.

Who have the good Libertarian candidates been in recent elections? Answer: none. Independents have swung at the ball though.

Look what happened in 2000, when a significant proportion of the Democratic base voted for Nader. Or when Ross Perot took away the vote from some Republicans in 1992. People remember very little, but they remember that stuff.
I wanted Ross Perot to win. He was a candidate with integrity.
 

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NO MA'AM
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Born and raised in a Democrat household - my dad had a Mondale '84 bumper sticker on the family truckster. My mother was a lobbyist for years, and she was in tight with all the big muckety-mucks in the Dem machine. A lot of these people were regulars at our table. By the time I was old enough to think for myself, I started to lean to the right. Partially out of teenage rebellion, and partially out of independent thought, I registered Republican on my 18th birthday when I also signed up for selective service. For several years I was active in youth groups sponsored in one way or another by the GOP.

The last 5 years or so, though, I've become so disillusioned by the GOP (both major parties, actually) that I have since changed my registration from "R" to "I". I'm a small "c" conservative, registered Independent, and like DocWard labeled a "Libertarian". I hate labels, though (my punk roots showing again?), so I have chosen not to partake in TB's poll because I don't want to be aligned with any one party. But like Geddy Lee sang, "If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice", so I guess if I HAD to pick one I'd pick "other" simply because "all of the above" isn't a choice. I like to think that I vote for the best candidate (or the lesser of two evils) regardless of party affiliation. I also like turnips. Especially with haggis.

~A
 

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I think I can answer that.

Who have the good Libertarian candidates been in recent elections? Answer: none. Independents have swung at the ball though.
Maybe Ron Paul was a start. At least he brought the Libertarian ideas to the forefront.

Had he run as a Libertarian he would have drained the Republican vote but it wouldn't have mattered as it ultimately turned out.

Both the Republicans and Democrats would notice if Libertarians started to muster some support. Being politicians, they would likely alter their policies to try to win back those voters.

Politicians have one goal in mind - be elected or re-elected. Ethics be damned.
 

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Don't argue with an insomniac.
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Discussion Starter #18
So I'll be a contrarian on this. I think many politicians go into it to be a force for positive change in the way the country is run. Some think that the government can level the playing field, others think more resources need to go to the military to change things that way. Some simply think that government should be as small and unobtrusive as possible. Others think government intrusion is necessary to prevent social chaos, or gross unfairness, or whatever.
So they want to get elected to make those changes, in whichever direction they think things need to go. Of course, if they want to do this, they need to get elected. And I think most of them get drawn into the power struggles, the compromises, the need to make deals, and often lose their principles along the way.
Some get into politics clearly from the outset, with only the desire to help their friends and get rich along the way. Of course, most people think it's the opposing party that does this, while the party they support is only working to do the right thing.
 
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