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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
posted this in the brake section but got no response...so thought this would be the next best place. has anyone tried the cryo power slot rotors? i was wondering if i should go with the premium power slots or the cryo's. i've read that there is a different "bed in" procedure for the cryo rotors as opposed to the premiums. i was also planning on going with hawk cereamic pads. are these rotors any good or are there any others that you guys recommed. i use my truck as a daily driver to work and on the weekends i'm off 4wheelin to my fav surf spot or in the mountains riding dirtbikes. your input will be greatly appriciated. :thumb:
 

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You can also try Zeckhausen. Ive bought slotted rotors / ceramic pads for my BMW and Acura from Dave and never had a problem.
 

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2015 Toyota Tundra DC SR5 5.7L
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I wish this forum would put to bed the whole "plain vs. slotted vs. cross-drilled" debate once and for all. Every thread is nothing more than a vote on preferences.
 

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I had a pair cryo'd for my G35S, it doesn't stop them from warping anymore than crossdrilled/slotted.

I've had all 4, crossdrilled, slotted, cryo'd, stock. Crossdrilled or slotted definately lasted better than stock. Cryo makes no difference.

I've never had a cross drilled rotor crack. I would imagine BMW and Mercedes haven't either since they put them on some of their cars factory.

Which is better? IDK? Do they work better than stock because of the slots/holes?? IDK? Maybe it's better iron. Maybe it's because I put on better pads whenever I do the rotors.
 

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Plain jane brembo blank rotor are fine.
:tu::tu:

cross drilled/slotted not necessary for our trucks. and as for the cracking of cross drilled/slotted rotors... this is caused by excessive heat. general rule of thumb is that this type of heat is very seldom experienced in normal everyday driving. especially in a truck.

cross drilled/slotted for showing not slowing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Plain jane brembo blank rotor are fine.
i was eyeing the brembo rotors too, and the price for them wasnʻt that bad. i know that a lot of guys went with the power slots from wheelersofroad but that will set me back $200 some what dollars + the pads for another $120, as opposed to $100 for the bremboʻs. thanks for all the input guys:)
 

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2015 Toyota Tundra DC SR5 5.7L
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Yeah, wouldn't it be great if we all thought and did exactly alike? :rolleyes:
Since you missed the point, the main idea is there are component and install methodologies that work based on long term experience, and ones that don't. Forums are not benefitted when the same topic is posted over and over again with the same people making the same assertions which are nothing more than opinions and preferences, a large part of which are simply spouted marketing hype.

Every brake professional here has posted over and over again all the reasons why a cross-drilled rotor does not belong on a 2+ ton truck yet we see every week or so another post asking whether the OP should get "drilled or slotted". These posts diffuse the efficacy of this forum by making searches that much more difficult.

Does that clarify it for you?
 

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Since you missed the point, the main idea is there are component and install methodologies that work based on long term experience, and ones that don't. Forums are not benefitted when the same topic is posted over and over again with the same people making the same assertions which are nothing more than opinions and preferences, a large part of which are simply spouted marketing hype.

Every brake professional here has posted over and over again all the reasons why a cross-drilled rotor does not belong on a 2+ ton truck yet we see every week or so another post asking whether the OP should get "drilled or slotted". These posts diffuse the efficacy of this forum by making searches that much more difficult.

Does that clarify it for you?
Had you spelled benefited correctly, I might have caught on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Since you missed the point, the main idea is there are component and install methodologies that work based on long term experience, and ones that don't. Forums are not benefitted when the same topic is posted over and over again with the same people making the same assertions which are nothing more than opinions and preferences, a large part of which are simply spouted marketing hype.

Every brake professional here has posted over and over again all the reasons why a cross-drilled rotor does not belong on a 2+ ton truck yet we see every week or so another post asking whether the OP should get "drilled or slotted". These posts diffuse the efficacy of this forum by making searches that much more difficult.

Does that clarify it for you?
i find the "search forum-search posts" helps out little or none at all. it doesent search for what i type in at all and if it does, it pulls up some random thread that has nothing to do with what i am searching for. i also posted in the brake section and got no help there either. what i am tryin to say or get out of people is their input or opinion...advise if you will with the specified rotors or rotors in general. some people just repeat the marketing mantra and some people actually know what they are writing about....it's all about taking everything with a grain of salt:cool:
 

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i find the "search forum-search posts" helps out little or none at all. it doesent search for what i type in at all and if it does, it pulls up some random thread that has nothing to do with what i am searching for. i also posted in the brake section and got no help there either. what i am tryin to say or get out of people is their input or opinion...advise if you will with the specified rotors or rotors in general. some people just repeat the marketing mantra and some people actually know what they are writing about....it's all about taking everything with a grain of salt:cool:
i'll take three grains of salt, please. ;) i know what you mean on the search gig. sometimes i find what i am looking for. sometimes not. one thing i have learned though is that if i use the search function, i am prepared to spend some time to learn what i am after. this is tough for some folks who are used to the "fast food" mentality that bleeds over into other facets of their lives. a societal issue to say the least. not picking on you, just an observation of this country's current involution.

i get what remmy700 is saying too. i posted the same response on this thread as i did on one less than 2 weeks ago on the same topic. it's like pete and repeat.
 

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Everyone please read this:
StopTech : Balanced Brake Upgrades

The page which serves that link is here, and it is worth all of your time to read all of it, including skimming the mathematical derivations that may or may not make sense to everyone.

Stoptech is the company which manufactures the "Big Brake Kit" for the 1st-gen Tundras.

posted this in the brake section but got no response...so thought this would be the next best place. has anyone tried the cryo power slot rotors? i was wondering if i should go with the premium power slots or the cryo's. i've read that there is a different "bed in" procedure for the cryo rotors as opposed to the premiums. i was also planning on going with hawk cereamic pads. are these rotors any good or are there any others that you guys recommed. i use my truck as a daily driver to work and on the weekends i'm off 4wheelin to my fav surf spot or in the mountains riding dirtbikes. your input will be greatly appriciated. :thumb:
FWIW, I've noticed that if I take the time to bed the brakes, I get that excellent stopping power sooner than if I just drive on them for a couple weeks...and that's only with these carbon/kevlar pads. I have no idea about other pads.

Personally, I wouldn't worry about embellishments on the rotor. I have the same crossdrilled rotors now that I did years ago, but I'm sure they would've been just fine with slots or nothing at all.

The most important thing, whether you are choosing to bed the brakes or not, is DON'T STAND ON HOT BRAKES. Keep the truck rolling, even if slowly, and avoid the classic scenario of riding the brakes all the way down the big hill to sit at the stoplight at the bottom. That is a certain guarantee for juddering brakes.

The front rotors on my truck were cryo-treated. I have not abused enough pairs of cryo-treated and untreated rotors to say if there's a difference. Logically it makes sense, however I do suspect that if you treat your brakes well, that they will remain in excellent condition regardless of any treatment or lack thereof.

Some anecdotal tales from my own braking system...when I bought the truck many years ago, within a couple months one of the springs in a drum brake failed. I don't even remember which side it was, but the result was a slight pull and near-total reliance on the front brakes to stop the truck. With my driving habits at the time, the rotors began juddering pretty severely...the pedal would actually kick back. A set of new wear items all around, and everything was back to normal for a while.

Later, when those rotors began juddering, I bought some rotors & pads from Wheelers, sent them out for cryo, and also read all the information on the Stoptech website. I chose to bed the brakes on a rolling, fairly steep mountain road, and had just finished when I saw construction ahead, of course at the bottom of the hill, and of course I had to stop...it was a classic "REALLY?!" moment...here I had just baked the equipment, and was being forced to do the exact thing that everyone agrees is the absolute worst thing you can do to your brakes.

In one day, my perfect new brakes were juddering, from that stop alone. I was pissed. I also discovered that with very careful driving, the abrasive action of the pads against the rotor would wear down the spot where all that pad material had baked to the rotor.

It took about two years before the sticky spot was finally worn down, and I'm still driving on those same rotors almost eight years later. I am on a second set of pads, and I recently changed the calipers to the TSB version...but they're the same old rotors.

I don't credit the crossdrilling. I'm not sure if I would go so far as to credit the cryo treatment, but the juddering never intensified, and elimination of potential high spots due to differences in the braking surface material is one of the intents of cryo treatment.

The pedal never kicked back like it did with the original rotors, by the way...it was just a pulse in deceleration.

I have also had the dubious honor of running a genuinely warped rotor. It was warped from the factory, like they didn't cut it correctly, and at the time I was using a floating caliper. Since the thickness was consistent, the floating caliper would move around, but the pedal didn't kick back. In other words, the fluid volume inside the piston was not changing. I changed both the rotors and calipers to a 4x fixed setup similar to the front, and the rotors were machined true before they arrived on my doorstep...no problems since.

Compare that to my experience with the original stock rotors. The pedal would actually kick back...in other words, the fluid volume in the piston was changing, which would only result from a difference in thickness around the braking surface, a phenomenon which is very clearly described in the white paper in the link above...and note that a part of the cause of that phenomenon is the target of cryogenic treatment of brake rotors.

don't the cross drilled ones have a tendancy to crack or warp?
I've only been using the same crossdrilled rotors for about eight years. I'll let you know when they crack, or the next time they start juddering...or if they've coned or worn thin.

cross drilled/slotted for showing not slowing.
That is a good rule of thumb for gently-driven, half-ton trucks...which is likely most of us. Good driving habits, and possibly good equipment, are far more important than slots or holes. The brakes are already vented, so I'm inclined to follow the advice of more knowledgeable members and stick with solid braking surfaces in the future.

Had you spelled benefited correctly, I might have caught on.
If I go back and corecct his spellnig erorr, will it the rest of it be all make sence?

one thing i have learned though is that if i use the search function, i am prepared to spend some time to learn what i am after. this is tough for some folks who are used to the "fast food" mentality that bleeds over into other facets of their lives.
I agree.

If anybody wants fries with this response, I'm sure we can rustle up a deep fryer and some potatoes.

Dammit, now I'm hungry :lol:.

Now, everyone go make your own informed, intelligent decisions. I'm off to find something deep-fried to eat.

-Sean
 

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2015 Tundra TRD Silver
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Well, I disagree that cross drilled rotors crack and warp. I have drilled and slotted rotors that were installed 20,000 miles ago and its the best investment that I have ever made for my Tundra. The stopping power improved significantly; I wish I had known about these rotors years ago as it is now I can only pass this info along. Please, take my advice go drilled and slotted on rotors; you won't regret it.
 
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