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Discussion Starter #1
anyone know by a chance how much i should expect to pay to get my rotors turned and rear brakes adjusted? i will be going to a new shop this time and what to know what to expect first.
 

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My wife went to Monroe and got a qoute of $774 to replace the rotors and pads all around on her 2003 Pilot. I found a local guy who does work on the side to do it for $250 including parts from Napa and his labor. He tried to charge me $60 for labor. I forced him to take $80. :D Otherwise is would have been $230. I'm not that cheap. :p
 

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turning rotors should be 1 hour and to adjust the rear brake are about .5 of an hour. so expect to pay 1.5 hours for whatever the shop charges for labor.
 

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anyone know by a chance how much i should expect to pay to get my rotors turned and rear brakes adjusted? i will be going to a new shop this time and what to know what to expect first.
I got a coupon once from toyota dealer: front pads replaced/rotors turned $200.
But I went to my neighbor, who works for the same dealer and he did it for $50.;)
 

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Just buy the rotor kit from wheeler's off road, thier slotted & drilled...one or the other. They come with pads I think too.
 

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Just an FYI, I got my PowerSlot rotors and Hawk HPS pads for $247 shipped to my door from PerformancePeddler.com. Super fast shipping, and they sent me status emails about every other day until they arrived. I would definitely order from them again, and after much research, they seemed to be the cheapest. Did the job myself, and I have to say that there is no reason for anyone to pay to have anyone touch the front brakes on your tundra unless you're rich and don't care, or simply have no time at all.

Just my $0.02.;)
 

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anyone know by a chance how much i should expect to pay to get my rotors turned and rear brakes adjusted? i will be going to a new shop this time and what to know what to expect first.
Do not get the rotors resurfaced if you don't need it. If the brakes feel fine and there is no pulsation, leave them alone turning them is likely to make things worse.
If you do need to have them resurfaced, it should only be done with an on the car lathe. Some shop will charge more for this. Just make sure they have the equipment and know how to use it.
A rear brake adjustment should include a cleaning.
Don't waste your money on fancy drilled or slotted rotors. It serves no purpose besides looks. If you need to buy, buy a good name brand. Brembo, Raybestos, Toyota, Napa, ect.
Mike
 

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Don't waste your money on fancy drilled or slotted rotors. It serves no purpose besides looks. If you need to buy, buy a good name brand. Brembo, Raybestos, Toyota, Napa, ect.
Mike
I'll have to disagree as slotted rotors can dissipate heat better than solid ones. The pad life might not be as great, but the cooling capability of slotted vs non-slotted is noticable. Worth the money for our trucks though, that's a whole different can of worms.
 

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Do not get the rotors resurfaced if you don't need it. If the brakes feel fine and there is no pulsation, leave them alone turning them is likely to make things worse.
If you do need to have them resurfaced, it should only be done with an on the car lathe. Some shop will charge more for this. Just make sure they have the equipment and know how to use it.
x2. J3T, if they're pulsing, consider new rotors, and read the technical papers at Stoptech.com (they make the TRD BBK and other packages) regarding how to prevent pulsation. If they're not pulsing, and the wear tab on the pads wasn't dragging (for long), no need to mess with the rotors...just get another set of the same pads and you're gtg.
A rear brake adjustment should include a cleaning.
That too. All sorts of stuff gets in there over time...mud, dirt, salt, pad material buildup...I had someone else do it, came out around 100 bucks...I didn't have time but you can do it yourself unless they're pulsing as well, then consider new drums. If you get new rotors or drums, get new pads/shoes at the same time to prevent irregular wear.
Don't waste your money on fancy drilled or slotted rotors. It serves no purpose besides looks.
The part I bolded is absolutely not true. Whether you need them vs want them is an entirely different matter. If you drive gently, run a stock tire size, and have never had a problem with fading, pulsing, boiling, etc, you don't need them and I agree they are a waste of money--the vent sandwich is sufficient.

J3T, the front end is really, really easy to handle...even the rear isn't bad, from looking over the manual. Like someone else said, just get reputable parts from somewhere with a good price and DIY :). Post up if you need a hand :tu:.

-Sean
 

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I personaly don't think slotted or drilled rotors are a waste of money, especialy when you almost pay that much to get the stock ones turned, and installed. I think there is a reason most sport cars have them, they cool better, clean better, and stop better, because of all those reasons. I think the Tundra's brakes suck, especialy after you put bigger tires or rims on. Imo, any little bit of help you can get for stopping is worth it to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I personaly don't think slotted or drilled rotors are a waste of money, especialy when you almost pay that much to get the stock ones turned, and installed. I think there is a reason most sport cars have them, they cool better, clean better, and stop better, because of all those reasons. I think the Tundra's brakes suck, especialy after you put bigger tires or rims on. Imo, any little bit of help you can get for stopping is worth it to me.
ive looked into the wheelers slottted/drilled rotors and brake pads. I think i would be able to put them on myself with a hand, no big deal...i just dont see how cleaning my rear brakes are gonna fix this issue, as the pulsation and vibrating shakes the whole truck at certain speeds. i use the ebrake consistant which i was always informed adjusted the rear brakes and kept them in line. plus im gonna go with 33" tires in the future and i dont like them on the idea of the stock brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
ive looked into the wheelers slottted/drilled rotors and brake pads. I think i would be able to put them on myself with a hand, no big deal...i just dont see how cleaning my rear brakes are gonna fix this issue, as the pulsation and vibrating shakes the whole truck at certain speeds. i use the ebrake consistant which i was always informed adjusted the rear brakes and kept them in line. plus im gonna go with 33" tires in the future and i dont like them on the idea of the stock brakes.
if i get the wheelers rotors and pads in the front, will i have to do anything to the rear brakes besides cleaning?
 

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Not really, the rear's are good for a long time. You could clean them if you wanted, but not neccesary.
 

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I think it's a good idea to pull off the rear drums to clean out once in a while just to make sure they work well. I had never done this on my 2001 until a couple months ago, there was an incredible amount of brake dust all over everything and a pile of the stuff at the bottom of the drum. Used an old paint brush and a blower to get all the dust off. Do it outside and avoid breathing in the dust. It's pretty easy to do especially during tire rotation when you've already got the wheels off, you just need 2 bolts to push the drums off.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
ok so i was reading today and whats this self adjuster for the rear brakes? where you put the truck in Reverse back up and slam the brakes 2-3 times? is that the same thing as having a shop adjust the rear brakes?
 

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On Toyotas the self adjusters work when the parking brake is applied. If the parking brake is seldom used manual adjustment will be needed.

Here's why drilled and slotted rotors don't do anything on production vehicles.
First off drilling or slotting has nothing to do with cooling the brakes. It is used with high performance racing brake to vent the gasses the build up between the pad and rotor. Some slight amount of gasses can build up under normal street driving and this is why many pads have a slot cut in them. This is all the venting needed under normal driving.
On a production vehicle and performace vehical slotting is better then drilling. as drilling can cause stress cracks to develop and for this reason it is seldom used in racing anymore. Plus drilled holes simply clog up with pad dust and then serve no purpose at all.
But here's the real problem, rotors need to dispense heat to function. To do this they need mass. If you remove material from the rotor your remove mass and make it less efficient. And many production vehical rotors use as little mass as possible anyways. You wouldn't buy new rotors that had been machined down to minimum thickness, so why would you buy rotor that were drilled full of holes?
On race cars or with performance brake systems the rotor mass is more to start with and the removed material is figured in. These rotors are also replaced after one or two races so they have a very short life. When you buy a production vehicle rotor that has been drilled there is no extra material to make up for this. It's simply throwing your money away for a cool look.
Mike
 

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To answer the original question, I just had my rear rotors turned and new pads put on by a local auto shop for $119 plus tax. I took my wife's Infinity to Sears back in January, and they did the same service for around $150. Hope this helps
 

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Your right no one really answered his original question.
You just pointed out a good example of how much prices can vary and this is just you in your area, different shops, different vehicles. It can really vary nation wide and between makes and model and different labor rates
For example I now work on high end sports cars and rotors and pads can cost over $3000.00 on the make we sell. And you can wear a set out during a weekend racing.
Then again a very common car like a Civic or Caviler you could get pads and rotors turn most anywhere for about $80.00 - $100.00.
Labor rates in California are I believe $100.00 - $140.00 per hour, here in Ohio $60.00 - $80.00
Therefore the original question is very hard to answer, all you can give is a range. Tundra pads alone could range retail from $60.00 to $120.00, a shop might charge 1/2 hr labor and then $30 to $80 to machine the rotor depending on their equipment. Clean and adjusting the rear brakes could cost $20- $40 range.
 

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I just did the brakes on my sons buick skylark. I installed new rotors which were like $22 a piece and the pads were $23 for the set. I also used the time to show both of my boys how to do the job right so now they know how it's done. I can't see paying outrageous sums of money to anybody to do something that I can do for myself.
 

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And that's money in the bank!
 
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