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In the early 1960s my compadre started smoking cigarettes at age 12 ~ he wanted to be cool like the big kids.
He quickly became addicted and whenever the subject of quitting came up as a topic of conversation he'd say;

"Quitting smoking is really easy ~ I've done it 4 or 5 times already !"

And he was as serious as a heart attack.

Hey, if it was easy then everybody'd be doing it . . .
 

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Swing and a misfire for Honda Civic engine diagnosis
Click & Clack Ray Magliozzi
Dear Car Talk:
I bought gas from Sam’s and my 2001 Honda Civic started misfiring. I changed the spark plugs and air filter, then put Heet gas treatment and injector cleaner in the tank, but the engine is still misfiring. — AJ
It’s less likely that the misfiring was caused by Sam’s gasoline and more likely that it’s related to the fact that your car is 18 years old.
The first thing I’d hope for is a bad ignition coil. If the car is misfiring continuously (for example, if it’s misfiring at idle) it’s easy to test for that. While it’s running, try unplugging one ignition coil at time. Each time you remove a coil, the engine should run worse. So, if you disconnect one coil and nothing changes, that’s likely the bad one.
You can test this further by replacing that particular coil. If the car then runs perfectly, you’re all set. If it’s still misfiring, then you could have a valve that’s too tight in that cylinder, or if it’s been too tight for a while, you could have a valve that’s burned out. Another possibility is that you have a timing belt that jumped.
But check the coils first, AJ.
 

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Pump the brakes — this Subaru Outback needs work
Click & Clack Ray Magliozzi
Dear Car Talk:
I have a 2004 Subaru Outback, V-6. It makes a high-pitched humming noise, like millions of crickets, after I drive at freeway speed, but only after about 10 minutes on the road. It stops when I brake, then resumes. Oh, the Outback does have 272,000 miles on it. — Joy
It sounds as if you have a brake pad that’s sticking, causing it to rub against the disc rotor. Normally, the brake pads sit right against the disc rotors, and even touch a little bit, but not enough to slow the car or make any noise. Then, when you press the brake pedal, the brake caliper causes the pads to squeeze the spinning disc rotor, which is what stops the car.
Based on your description, it sounds like one of the calipers is sticky. So when you first start driving the car, everything is OK. But after about 10 minutes (and, more importantly, several applications of the brakes), the caliper fails to retract all the way, and leaves a pad pushed up against the rotor.
That’s what’s making the sound of a million crickets — the pad continually rubbing against the disc rotor as the wheel turns. When you actually use the brakes, and the pads are pushed tightly against the rotors, the noise temporarily goes away.
You should get this fixed, because it will eventually get worse. The danger is that if your brakes are always lightly applied, you can overheat the brake fluid. And if your brake fluid overheats and boils, it can’t transmit hydraulic pressure, and the brakes won’t work.
Have your mechanic check the brakes for a sticking caliper. But on a car this age, especially if the brakes have been neglected, the repair could easily cost $1,000, if the system needs pads, rotors and a caliper rebuild.
But if that’s what it takes to make the car safe, do it, Joy.
Post questions online at CarTalk.com.
 
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