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Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks. This week I'm picking up a complete rear clip from an 08 Sequoia (frame, diff, suspension, etc) for R&D purposes. While not the original intention of the purchase, thoughts of installing it in the Tundra have crossed my mind. Thoughts welcome....I'll post pictures when I get it....
 

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that may be good for the low riding street version, but not my cup of tea for a 4X4 tow machine. will be interesting to see however.
tim
 

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Hmmmmm.... Sequoia wheelbase vs. Tundra?
 

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Very interesting. As long as you were not planning a 5th wheel, it should be nice. Was the part available locally? Any interior left?
 

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This would be another alternative to doing a 4 link or triangulated 4 link in the rear for slamming a Tundra. Please, post pics when you can.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
IRS gets a bad rap, but if this swap goes through, I look forward to making it work well in most offroad situations. It's already better in some, but articulation is of course the downfall. But, we all know the Tundra is a mammoth, it will never be a good tight trail rock crawler... so why go after that one aspect? Load capacities for this IRS are right in line with the solid axle. In theory it should handle loads extremely well.

Wheel base won't be an issue as I'm not buying the whole frame, just the rear section....:eek:

No fifth wheels here, but some good loads go on the car trailer, a truck camper too... load capacity is excellent.

They have the whole truck about 2 hours east of me, might be a Platium. It has about 1k miles, not wrecked/flooded/stolen...

It would make a killer handling lowered truck... pics asap.
 

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I was thinking in terms of an AWD Tundra w/IRS. It may be easier to install Tundra cab/bed onto an LKQ Sequoia rolling chassis instead of having to graft in the sequoia rear suspension, swap T-case [you already tackled that one], deal w/ the computer issues, etc.
 

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I'd be very interested to see how the Tundra will handle with it, as well as the AVS thing-a-ma-jig and load leveling feature.... And with that in mind, would a 5th wheel REALLY be an issue? I always thought that 5th wheels were nicer on "tongue weight"... Dunno much about all that anyways...

I guess it will make it much easier to lift/drop, although probably more costly...

Can't wait to see it...
 

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Ohhh..

What I would imagine out of this is a Truck that does not ride like a truck any more!
I pray for the day I could come across such....
To "feed the need" for a truck, yet not have it run like a tractor... Hey... I'm all for it, as long as it doesn't downgrade the "truck" capabilities...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This suspension is pretty neat. It uses three (3!) longish arms per side which are packaged to keep the frame wide and rigid - Note the curve of the upper arm in the first picture, this allows it to wrap around the wide frame as it nears the end of the travel. I'll speculate that using three arms greatly adds to to the strength and stability of this suspension. The system uses one upper arm and two lower arms. The upper arms are used for location and the bumpstop. The forward lower arm is for location and damper (shock), the rear lower arm is used to carry things, it has the spring or airbag, and also align. It also appears to provide allot of extra stability... most IRS systems use a single lower arm to carry weight and locate, and then have a tie rod of sorts to align and stabilize. Toyota's design spreads the load out over 3 bushing and much area... also check out how the arms mount to the outer suspension, two ball joints in double shear, and a single regular....cool stuff!


Looking from the front, upper arm and forward lower arm.


Looking from behind, you can see the rear lower arm here at the bottom of the picture. The spring or airbag fits in that large opening.


More later....
 

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the reason, as i understand it, that IRS is shied away from in trucks has nothing to do with its ability to handle weight. it has more to do with the caster/camber of tires once that weight is placed in the rear of the truck. as you change payload and/or tongue weight, the tires caster/camber of the tires changes significantly and can cause accelerated tire wear.

HMMWVs (or Humvees for you civilian types) run IRS. with the varying payloads that the military demands the vehicles carry and tow, they shred rear tires faster than front tires.

the fix, obviously, would be auto leveling suspension...then you would get the benefit of IRS handling and ride while maintaining tread life. on the other hand, with a longer wheel based vehicle, i am not sure that the benefits would be that great anyhow...

not trying to step on your mojo, just thinking out loud...make it happen!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Good info and pertinent to this discussion.... no mojo lost. :tu:

This particular Sequoia came with the factory airbag system. If they (airbags) won't limit travel they may remain.... and while having the complete factory system would be excellent, it has a computer with far to many inputs and outputs to make the swap worthwhile, they likely will use a manually switched system.

Speaking of travel, with a few minor mods an honest 12" - 13" of travel should be attainable. Absolute travel from metal to full droop is 15.5".

Now here is the diff.


Toyota lists it as having a 10" ring gear. The case looks massive, all cast iron. It has the 1.45" shafts on the cv joints. The CV axle shafts measure 1.31, so they should be larger at the spline. It also has what I call a "limited slip diff light". Conical springs apply pressure to the side gears and create a friction between them and the case. While they can't supply the torque that real LSD clutch packs do, some does make it to each wheel. Turn one wheel and the other turns in the same direction.
 

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one side of me says IRS bastardizes the truck... but.... the handling benefits (hrrm, AWD already done) pique my interests. Hell, go for it, make it work, break the bastard. :D We'll never know. The worst we can say is that Jowett made a better Ridegline :p
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ridgeline! LOL... Do they have beadlocks and the possibilty of portal axles? ;)

I hear you, and nothing is in stone yet. There are still a few R&D miles to be run on my Deaver Springs, so if I do decide to go for it, it won't be right away. IRS would be better in 90% of the situations the truck will be in.

Did I mention this particular clip came from Ford? It was a test vehicle for them.... kind of funny.
 

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Those Ridgelines must be made of gold or some other precious metal... For as many as you see on the streets, you sure don't come across many used ones for sale...


JE, just out of curiosity, why are they(Ford) parting out their test Sequoia?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Most if not all manufacturers purchase the competition's vehicles to see what makes them tick. The yard (Greenleaf) I purchased this clip from is owned by Ford. When done testing the vehicles, Ford cuts all of them in half, then sells them off to their various yards around the country.
 
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