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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a 2004 tundra second hand and as per usual it came with its own set of problems.... One of which was a broken (and poorly repaired) shift cable. For those of you who don't know; the first generation tundras have a nylon/polymer (not sure of exact material) hind joint that is moulded over/around a knurled end of the shift cable (pictured below).

The down side to this is that it creates a weak spot in the system, so over the years they sometimes weaken and break like mine.

Living in Canada where the population of the whole country is 3 million less than the state of California (but having 24 times the amount of land) there is a significantly lower demand for automotive parts outside of the North American manufactures, Toyota Canada knows this and puts a $530.65 CND price tag on said shift cable. Naturally this was not an option so after taking some measurements and doing some serious brain storming, the fix went as follows

What you will need:

• One 5/16-24 Allen bolt 1 1/2" long (Allen head size should be 1/4" ~ $2

• One 5/16-24 rod end (hind joint) ~ $25


Procedure:

Cut the rod portion of the shift cable just behind the position the dust boot is crimped.


Tig weld the 5/16-24 Allen bolt onto the end of the cut rod (keep it true)


Rust coat the Allen bolt and your weld (I clear coated it while hot so the finish is baked on)


Thread 5/16-24 rod end onto the end of the shift cable.


Adjust to fit and instal, you may have to dress(grind/file down) the sides of the Rod end to fit on to the shift linkage.




The total cost of this fix was well under $40 which sure beats the $530 replacement cable, and this is a guaranteed long term fix.

Hope this helps.


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Wow...thanks for this. My cable snapped at the same spot at the plastic end joint that was no longer able to swivel from all the rust. Hopefully there's enough rod left to weld the bolt onto.
 

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Awesome job - definitely has given me inspiration (mine just failed). I'm thinking about using a die to put threads on the shifter linkage cable rod, has anyone tried that? Might have to use a 1/4" rod end and then drill it out to take the 5/16" stud.
 

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Update - this repair is possible without welding. The shaft is pretty much the perfect size to run a die over to make threads (at least it was on my 2005 4WD Sequoia). I bought a rod end bearing that had 1/4-28 (fine) threads and ran a die over the rod and it worked perfectly.

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Clamped the shaft onto the sway bar to hold it for running the die over it:

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Threaded it:
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Testing the fit of the rod end:
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Had to file down the pivot stud a bit for the 1/4" rod end to fit over it:
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No need to take the file/grinder to the ball as it was the perfect width already:
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Reinstalled and adjusted it:
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Couldn't be happier with paying $12 for this fix rather than the $500 for the new cable. It shifts so much nicer now, obviously that plastic end had been seized on the metal for a long time due to rust. Thanks again FarmerTanTerror for the inspiration on this repair.
 

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I wanted to say how grateful I am for this thread along with all other treads/YouTube videos, etc on Tundra repair. I have an 02 Tundra 4.7L, 140k, lived its whole life in Wisconsin. 20 years in the winter this was bound to happen sooner than later. I had just finished a trans oil change, when I was shifting through the gears and got to low-it snapped. Same place as shown above. I followed the DIY fix with the 1/4x28 rod end bearing. Threaded the rod with with accompanying die. Filed down the stud to fit rod bearing. Installed the rod bearing with a pinch nut to about the same length of the factory set up. This was an easy fix for someone who knows their away around basic metal/repair work. Cost $12 for rod end bearing at local ag store. Thanks again for this thread! Saved me a lot of money.
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