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I just picked up a used 06 SR5 double cab the other day. Can somebody explain the shift L button on the 06 double cabs? It doesn't look like it does anything to me.
 

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The steering column shift lever starts at 2 and does not go down to L (first). The "Shift L" button is used to shift from 2 to L for towing or maximum braking.

To use: Shift to "2" using the column shifter and then press the "Shift L" button. You should see a 2->L indicator on the panel.

Hope this helps...
 

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Make sure your going very slow while doing the above as 1st gear is a step one. I'd say no more than 5-10mph!
 

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Make sure your going very slow while doing the above as 1st gear is a step one. I'd say no more than 5-10mph!
I wouldn't even advise doing it while moving. Do it from a complete stop.

I would say it could also be used for extreme off-roading only when necessary. You're getting maximum torque and the transmission wont shift into a higher gear.
 

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Just wondering about that shift button myself. Could this shift be used to pull a boat from a steep boat ramp? Then while normal driving shift back to normal driving?:ts:
 

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Just wondering about that shift button myself. Could this shift be used to pull a boat from a steep boat ramp? Then while normal driving shift back to normal driving?:ts:
That would be fine. Shift back to D after you no longer need it though. You are creating excessive heat in the transmission and engine if you run in the low gear for a prolonged period of time because the transmission will not shift.
 

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I did the same thing, reading is fundamental!
 

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That would be fine. Shift back to D after you no longer need it though. You are creating excessive heat in the transmission and engine if you run in the low gear for a prolonged period of time because the transmission will not shift.
I don't know where you got this idea, there is no such warning in the owners manual concerning this. I have driven for hours in the "SHIFT L" position while crawling around on gnarly dirt roads with no issues whatsoever.

JMHO

Dan
 

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Make sure your going very slow while doing the above as 1st gear is a step one. I'd say no more than 5-10mph!
The transmission will not allow a downshift into first when the "SHIFT L" button is pressed unless you are at or below 22 mph. Once you are in "SHIFT L", it will stay there until the button is pressed again or you manually shift up to "2" or higher. Maximum rated speed in "SHIFT L" is 34 mph (for AC models), 31 mph (for DC models).

All this from the 2006 Owners Manual.

JMHO

Dan
 

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I don't know where you got this idea, there is no such warning in the owners manual concerning this. I have driven for hours in the "SHIFT L" position while crawling around on gnarly dirt roads with no issues whatsoever.

JMHO

Dan
So because it's not in the owners manual that means it won't harm your truck? If you're running your engine rpm high constantly while moving very slowly (specifically Shift L), you aren't getting effecient cooling, which over a PROLONGED period of time WILL cause excessive heat build up, which IS bad for the transmission. What do you think kills transmissions from hard towing? OH RIGHT the excessive heat! :rolleyes:
 

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So because it's not in the owners manual that means it won't harm your truck? If you're running your engine rpm high constantly while moving very slowly (specifically Shift L), you aren't getting effecient cooling, which over a PROLONGED period of time WILL cause excessive heat build up, which IS bad for the transmission. What do you think kills transmissions from hard towing? OH RIGHT the excessive heat! :rolleyes:
Show me a substantiated example of this and I will listen. Otherwise the factory recommendations as stated in the manual are what I am going by. There are NO warnings concerning prolonged operations in "SHIFT L" that would result in abnormal heat build up in the transmission at all.

The 4wd owners out there that crawl around all day in desert heat in "SHIFT L" would be raising a ruckus on how weak the Tundra is if that were the case. I know of no concerns from that crowd.

JMHO

Dan
 

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Show me a substantiated example of this and I will listen. Otherwise the factory recommendations as stated in the manual are what I am going by. There are NO warnings concerning prolonged operations in "SHIFT L" that would result in abnormal heat build up in the transmission at all.

The 4wd owners out there that crawl around all day in desert heat in "SHIFT L" would be raising a ruckus on how weak the Tundra is if that were the case. I know of no concerns from that crowd.

JMHO

Dan
TCI - TRANSMISSION COOLING PRODUCTS: Coolers, Fans, Gauges, etc...

Transmission temperature/failure chart.

this is a GREAT one. TOYOTA specific. Read the part on viscosity and thermal stability. http://www.autoshop101.com/forms/AT06.pdf

Ten Tips to a Healthy Transmission

I could go find more, but I don't need to. If you want to run your truck in Shift L at high rpms all day like those desert guys and expect no problems, BE MY GUEST! :cool:

Excessive heat WILL damage a transmission.
 

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TCI - TRANSMISSION COOLING PRODUCTS: Coolers, Fans, Gauges, etc...

Transmission temperature/failure chart.

this is a GREAT one. TOYOTA specific. Read the part on viscosity and thermal stability. http://www.autoshop101.com/forms/AT06.pdf

Ten Tips to a Healthy Transmission

I could go find more, but I don't need to. If you want to run your truck in Shift L at high rpms all day like those desert guys and expect no problems, BE MY GUEST! :cool:

Excessive heat WILL damage a transmission.
I do not doubt that excessive heat will damage a transmission. That is why my towing package included a transmission oil cooler.

Examples 1 & 2 are trying to sell transmission oil coolers and while their "chart" may show the problems associated with high transmission temperature they show no actual measured examples of transmission temperatures or what types of driving it takes for the transmission to get that hot.

Data. I want to look at data. Measured transmission oil temperatures under repeatable conditions where I can understand at what risk I am putting my transmission in with the types of driving I do on and off the road.

Example #3 is excellent. This IS authoritative, substantiated information from a reliable source. It provides NO information on what can cause excessive transmission heat, how to avoid it or whether it is a common problem or only associated with adverse conditions.

Example #4 is from a transmission shop and while it looks like good advice, some of the advice here is flatly incorrect:

3. Don’t Place Shift Lever in Drive or Reverse when engine is at "Fast Idle". This can cause abrupt transmission engagement leading to early failure of clutches, bands, gear sets, driveline components and engine or transmission mountings.

My Toyota Tundra starts in fast idle. The owners manual does not caution against shifting into drive in this condition.

7. Don’t Drive Until The Engine Warms Up. For your transmission to perform properly, the fluid must be at operating temperature. Give it a few minutes and it will give you better and longer service.

This is a crock of steer-with-hangy-down-parts-doo-doo. There is absolutely no evidence to support this. Nor does my owners manual mention any concerns regarding this at all.

9. Don’t Stop Suddenly. Like fast starts, sudden stops can damage drivetrain components like engine and transmission mounts. These can lead to transmission damage. After any sudden emergency stop, it would be wise to have your mounts checked.

So just drive right through that car that just pulled out in front of you. Great advice right there.​

How, with this data can I determine what is putting my transmission at risk with the types of driving that I do? At what ambient temperature, at what vehicle load, at what speed and for how long and at what measured transmission oil temperature should I become concerned?

Again, I will say that driving indefinitely in "SHIFT L" will NOT raise my transmission temperature to unacceptable levels unless I can be shown otherwise.

I can certainly see that heavy towing without a cooler on hot days could. But I want to see the data.

JMHO

Dan
 

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Man I wish you were like a little kid so I could just give you a lollypop and you'd be happy. :cool:

Trans coolers work when the vehicle is moving. You're not getting enough air to cool anything at such low speeds with high engine rpm. But honestly, I'm done arguing, and looking for data. Enjoy beating that tranny up. :D
 

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Maybe i did not read enough of this post But i see FXNGLAS using the words "running at HIGH RPM" and BURGMEN stated that he was crawling, low RPMS. you guys are discussing two different situations. SO YOU ARE BOTH RIGHT FROM WHAT I CAN TELL!

Great links thanks.
 

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Maybe i did not read enough of this post But i see FXNGLAS using the words "running at HIGH RPM" and BURGMEN stated that he was crawling, low RPMS. you guys are discussing two different situations. SO YOU ARE BOTH RIGHT FROM WHAT I CAN TELL!

Great links thanks.
I tried to explain myself very carefully.

Transmissions can get hot if highly loaded for long periods (towing heavy loads uphill in the summer, etc.). That is why my class IV tow package comes with a transmission oil cooler.

Low load slow running (as in crawling up and down on steep dirt roads) can be done for DAYS without risk of overheating the transmission (or engine for that matter).

But I asked for (and didn't get) actual measurements of transmission oil temperatures under realistic conditions that actually show what it takes to overheat a transmission to the point of risk. Unsubstantiated positions are opinions of questionable origin. Haven't seen any DATA yet.

JMHO

Dan
 
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