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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was very surprised today to discover this and maybe you have already noticed it. Someone here complained of a white line of crud trickling down from the side mirrors (not tow) after they washed and dried their T. Well if you fold the side mirror frontwards or back you can see an aluminum alloy block that supports the mirror that is kinda dished out and will hold a pool of water in there. Very poor design.
Well mine is corroded to hell. Its covered with this fine white oxidation powder, the kind aluminum makes when it corrodes and it too leaves a fine white line of crud under the mirror after washing.
I'm really pissed of at this obvious oversight by Toyota, and will be taking mine back in for the dealer to look at it and possibly replaced under warranty and I suggest you do too.
 

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I was very surprised today to discover this and maybe you have already noticed it. Someone here complained of a white line of crud trickling down from the side mirrors (not tow) after they washed and dried their T. Well if you fold the side mirror frontwards or back you can see an aluminum alloy block that supports the mirror that is kinda dished out and will hold a pool of water in there. Very poor design.
Well mine is corroded to hell. Its covered with this fine white oxidation powder, the kind aluminum makes when it corrodes and it too leaves a fine white line of crud under the mirror after washing.
I'm really pissed of at this obvious oversight by Toyota, and will be taking mine back in for the dealer to look at it and possibly replaced under warranty and I suggest you do too.
I wouldn't worry too much, unlike ferrous metals. When Al oxidizes the Aluinum Oxide actually protects the underlying Aluminum from more corrosion.

Most masts on sailboats are made of bare Al, and they are just left with the oxidation there...and you know how detrimental sea water can be.

Don't sweat it hoss...you in good shape!:tu::cool:
 

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I wouldn't worry too much, unlike ferrous metals. When Al oxidizes the Aluinum Oxide actually protects the underlying Aluminum from more corrosion.

Most masts on sailboats are made of bare Al, and they are just left with the oxidation there...and you know how detrimental sea water can be.

Don't sweat it hoss...you in good shape!:tu::cool:
I concur 100%
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OK Thanks for info...I've cool down abit now but I think I'll show it to the service guy anyway and see what he says.
What about spraying a little Rustcheck on it to slow down the corrosion??
 

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In some marine applications, they use what are called "sacrificial anodes" - basically a block of aluminum bolted on - so that the corrosive elements will strike there first, leaving the stuff you really don't want corrosion on a bit safer.

So, I agree that this is probably by design. (probably protects the heater elements, and electrical bits that are in there)
 

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In some marine applications, they use what are called "sacrificial anodes" - basically a block of aluminum bolted on - so that the corrosive elements will strike there first, leaving the stuff you really don't want corrosion on a bit safer.

So, I agree that this is probably by design. (probably protects the heater elements, and electrical bits that are in there)

actually they use zinc not aluminum anodes
 

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actually they use zinc not aluminum anodes
And they are used to protect the propellers underwater, not the masts or topside aluminum...saltwater carries the Zn and "electroplates" the prop, in essence.:)

Don't sweat your mirrors, they will be fine:cool: :tu:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah and I ain't near da ocean anyway....just my salty wife.
Thanks guys and congrats on yer new Tundy woody..give em hell.
 

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It's aluminum for fresh water & zinc for salt water or is it the other way around. I don't have my boat manual infront of me for this boating forum:p
 

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Hi fella's,

Not to be the bearer of ill tidings, but, what all of you seafarers are forgetting, is that when you put steel and alum together you get bad results. They are dissimilar metals, alum will be destroyed over time and should not normally be in direct contact with steel, add a little corrossive elements and it speeds up the process. I have seen alum thrashed when in contact with steel or when it is otherwise not protected.

So I am here to say that this is not a good thing and should not be considered normal, or at least should not be normal.

As far as the example of Alum masts on sailboats, they go into a fiberglass or wooden hull and are not in contact with steel.

Correct on that zincs are used on shafts to be a sacrificially destroyed.

Tony
Retired Chief Boatswains mate
 
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