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Discussion Starter #1
I currently have my '01 V8 AC torn down for a timing belt replacement at 104K. I bought a kit with all the goodies to do a complete job (w/p, tensioner, idlers, seals, etc.). My cam and crank seals look very good. I have new seals but I am wondering if I should replace them or leave well enough alone. Any thoughts?
 

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I currently have my '01 V8 AC torn down for a timing belt replacement at 104K. I bought a kit with all the goodies to do a complete job (w/p, tensioner, idlers, seals, etc.). My cam and crank seals look very good. I have new seals but I am wondering if I should replace them or leave well enough alone. Any thoughts?
I would leave them alone. We have 2 Tundras and both have the original seals. One has 186k on it and the other has 135k on it. Never leaked a drop of oil. If anything, I would run an Auto-Rx treatment to condition the seals and clean your oil side of the engine.

Ken
 

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:nod: YES Replace them! NO BRAINER! As soon as you do not, one of them could start leaking and that means tearing the thing apart AGAIN?
 

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Replace them. You are ALREADY there and have them in hand.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I understand the work involved and I still see a dilema. I don't think it's a no brainer. How many Tundras with less than 200K have had cam or crank seal leaks? I haven't heard of many people having oil leaks in their Tundras. I have seen replacement seals leak because something didn't set in exactly right. I would hate to have to tear everything apart again because one of the replacement seals started leaking.
 

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Seals don't usually fail all at once, they start weeping and then seeping and then dripping and get worse. There's always a dillema but this time I think you're right; improperly installing the seal will make the whole endeavor void. If there is no evidence of weeping, then you should be just fine until the next timing belt change. If the seal didn't fail in the first 90k miles, then you will probably be just fine until the next 90k. Even if it does start leaking a little in that time, it can wait until the next TB change. Now the water pump and tensioners are a different story. Use GOOD QUALITY PARTS! I can't stress this enough. I saw an Audi timing belt tensioner pulley we put in come back with 12k miles on it, start seizing up when it came in for an unrelated repair.
 

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If it ain't broke (or leaking) don't fix it. I did my wife's timing belt on her land cruiser at 197K, and the seals looked great. I had them on hand just in case, but they weren't needed. I agree with some of the others, why mess with the factory seal which was done right...if it's not leaking, the chances increase that it will by messing with it. I'd leave it.
 
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