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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am approaching the 30,000 mile service interval on my 2004 DC Tundra with the 2UZ-FE engine (V-8). My manual states that the plugs have to be changed or it will void the emmisions warranty. Fine, I can do that myself. I won't pay 285.00 for the dealer to replace them as it is a fairly easy job. It looks like removing the coils one at a time, check the gap (unless they are irridium or platinum) , a little anti-seize and the proper torque and I'm good to go. The trouble is the plug selection. One part of my owner's manual states that the truck came equipped with platinum plugs and should not need replacing until 50 or 60K miles. The specification section states that the replacement plug is an NGK BKR6EYA, which is a standard plug with a v-groove set up, not platinum or irridium. I have a list of replacement plugs ranging from a standard plug to expensive irridium plugs, but am not sure which to buy. I have a dealership close to me, but I don't trust them. So my question is, which plugs should I use? Am I going to do any damage to my truck by installing the more expensive platinum or irridium plugs, and if not, will I benefit from them over the stock plug?
 

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Even if their not irradium, they don't need to changed at 30k. Trust me, it won't make your truck run any better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Making my truck run better is not the issue. It runs just fine. Retaining my emmissions warranty is. There are expensive items on the emmissions warranty list, such as the ECM that are covered for 80 months or 80,000 miles and I want to preserve the warranty. I could just get it done at the dealer, but I know they will take every short cut they can. I can't stomach a $180.00 labor charge and $ 100.00 in parts. The exact plugs in the truck are only $ 1.98 at the parts store. If someone that has some experience with this could chime in, I would appreciate it. I have searched the threads and could not come up with an answer. It appears that different years came with different plugs. For example, a relative has a 2002 Access Cab that came with platinum plugs, but my 2004 did not. I don't get it.
 

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There has been a lot of confusion on this issue as some trucks seem to have come with standard plugs, some with platinum plugs, and some with iridium plugs. What's funny is that the emissions stuff is only covered 3/36....at least that's what I was hit with when I had the fill tube problem crop up 3 years and 1 week after my in-service date. Powertrain is covered 5/60 (I believe).

You can always call Toyota Customer No-Service and see what they say. Personally, I would leave the platinums in and change them no sooner than 60k. I don't think you are going to have a problem with emissions warranty coverage, even if something should go wrong.
 

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The NGK plugs (cooper core) are just fine and are the stock replacement for your truck, Denso is also a stock replacement. You can install the more expensive irridum plugs that are good for 100k replacement but the cooper cores at 30k and under 2 bucks you will not get to the price of the others at a 120k.
Do not buy or try any other plug from any other manufacturer, they will not work well or last. only NGK,& Denso will run great, and last a long time I have changed mine with Denso and NGK's got them from Toyota on sale 1.50 each and after 30k do not even look worn.
Hope this helps.
Kevin
 

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I agree, stay with either NGK's, Denso's whichever came installed on your Tundra. Changing at 30K is a good idea for the regular plugs and the Iridium's won't gain you anything other than extended life for a bunch more money. Toyota uses the Iridium plugs on their upscale models, performance engines and because of access difficulties on the rear cylinder banks on the transverse mounted V series engines. Our engines don't need them because access is good and they aren't performance engines unless they're supercharged. My plug gaps had opened some when I've changed them at 30K intervals.


Larry
 

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Running irridium tipped plugs will not give your truck 1,000,000 horsepower, but your fuel economy should go up some. Personally, I will be changing over to irridium. Denso of course.

Also, what difference does it make if you change the plugs now or just before you needed to "preserve" the warranty? If you're doing the work yourself, who else is going to know when exactly you did it?

Besides, spark plugs don't log miles. You could say they've been changed 100 times. Nobody can prove otherwise.
 

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I am approaching the 30,000 mile service interval on my 2004 DC Tundra with the 2UZ-FE engine (V-8). My manual states that the plugs have to be changed or it will void the emmisions warranty. Fine, I can do that myself. I won't pay 285.00 for the dealer to replace them as it is a fairly easy job. It looks like removing the coils one at a time, check the gap (unless they are irridium or platinum) , a little anti-seize and the proper torque and I'm good to go. The trouble is the plug selection. One part of my owner's manual states that the truck came equipped with platinum plugs and should not need replacing until 50 or 60K miles. The specification section states that the replacement plug is an NGK BKR6EYA, which is a standard plug with a v-groove set up, not platinum or irridium. I have a list of replacement plugs ranging from a standard plug to expensive irridium plugs, but am not sure which to buy. I have a dealership close to me, but I don't trust them. So my question is, which plugs should I use? Am I going to do any damage to my truck by installing the more expensive platinum or irridium plugs, and if not, will I benefit from them over the stock plug?
I would say the NGK or Denso Platinums would be a tad better than the Traditional spark plugs and NGK says OEM was BKR6EYA? I would run the top quality Platinum at the least and they are around $ 7.50 ea . But to fullfill your warranty you will just need to replace them and save reciept if someone wants proof!!
 

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I used the stock NGK's in mine. They are cheap, readily available and seem to work just fine. I actually run NGK's in all my vehicles.
 

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i read somewhere that 05-06 came with iridium plugs
 

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FYI: the 2004 runs a different plug than the 2005-2006. We (2004) require the NGK. If in doubt just pull one plug and get the part number of it.

I got mine from the dealer. There are specific items to each VIN as Toyota seems big on in year changes and not just end year.
 

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FYI: the 2004 runs a different plug than the 2005-2006. We (2004) require the NGK. If in doubt just pull one plug and get the part number of it.

I got mine from the dealer. There are specific items to each VIN as Toyota seems big on in year changes and not just end year.
Not true. Many NGK and Denso plugs are pretty much exactly identical in terms of specifications. They just have different part numbers and different logo's on them. In fact, I can bet you I could run the same plug from your 04 in my 06, and vice versa without any problems. In terms of performance, I couldn't say without trying, but the truck would run with a different plug other than what Toyota says to use.
 

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anyone found an application spec for the 05 or 06 yet? seems no body has them listed and seems we might have to go a 100K before they decide to make them? i was kinda wanting to change mine around 50K and i have 30K miles to find a set which will hopefully be time for Toyota or Denso to find an application!! Some of us that travel for a living would be getting close to a 100K on a 05 probably pretty soon i would suspect, guess just pull one and get info from installed plug and work it that way!!
 

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NGK
Make: TOYOTA
Model: TUNDRA
Year: 2005
Engine: V8 - 4.7L - FI - 2UZFE
Gap 0.032

Irridium Plug
Stock #4589
Part #IFR6T-11

IX Irridium
Stock #6418
Part #BKR6EIX

Double Platinum
Stock #2215
Part #BKR6EP-8

GP Platinum
Stock #7092
Part #BKR6EGP

Traditional plug
Stock #3783
Part #BKR6ES

Vpower plug
Stock #2249
Part #BKR6EYA

DENSO
Premium Plug
SK20R11
Gap 0.044

IR Power
IK20

2006 should be the same since nothing changed.
 

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So the owners manual does it again, they say spark plugs for 06 4.7LDC is
Denso KS20R11
NGK IFR6A11
Gap .043
So after a few searches on net and a few calls to parts house and Toyota i along with all of the people i talked to still seemed confused as most!! I said only way to figure out which plug works is to remove one and it was a Denso Iridium SK20R11 which after calling Denso Tech Support at 1-800-366-1123 said their Denso SN is 5304 and the number on the plug is IK20. If ya call Auto zone looking for an IK20 you will confuse everyone you talk to so just tell them ya want a Denso SN 5304 and you will get the correct plug!! Funny thing was i said while i have it out i would just check gap and it gapped at .035 which is not spec! guess i need to fix this issue and anti-sleeze them cause the one i removed was BONE DRY!!:confused: OEM Denso SN 3297/SK20R11=$3.99 or Denso SN 5304/IK20=$9.99 seems i am not "AS"confused now but we all know that's probably wrong! hehe!!
 

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Not sure why you emphasize that the one you removed was "bone dry". The factory does not use anti-seize paste on the plugs and in fact it is not necessary to do so. Check with the plug manufacturers; the good plugs (in this case Denso and NGK) are plated or coated in such a way that anti-seize paste is not necessary. The factory torque settings are specified for new, dry plugs. If you use anti-seize paste, remember to back off the torque settings appropriately, since the paste acts as a lubricant in this situation.
 

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Not sure why you emphasize that the one you removed was "bone dry". The factory does not use anti-seize paste on the plugs and in fact it is not necessary to do so. Check with the plug manufacturers; the good plugs (in this case Denso and NGK) are plated or coated in such a way that anti-seize paste is not necessary. The factory torque settings are specified for new, dry plugs. If you use anti-seize paste, remember to back off the torque settings appropriately, since the paste acts as a lubricant in this situation.
Reason i mentioned it was that during removal and installation the plugs were very hard to rotate with extension once torque was broken and stayed stiff just about till they were all the way out and in. If i new the torque i would use it at 1/2 setting but since info is hard to find i will just do the procedure on Denso's website 1/4 to 1/2 turn. I will end up buying a 3/8 drive TW cause only one i own is a 1/2 drive with lowest setting is 20 Ft Lb which i know will be TOO much with Anti-sleeze. Densos method worked good on my 93 PU and shouls suffice till i go to sears and get me a 3/8 drive TW Thanks for info!!
 

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So the owners manual does it again, they say spark plugs for 06 4.7LDC is
Denso KS20R11
NGK IFR6A11
Gap .043
So after a few searches on net and a few calls to parts house and Toyota i along with all of the people i talked to still seemed confused as most!! I said only way to figure out which plug works is to remove one and it was a Denso Iridium SK20R11 which after calling Denso Tech Support at 1-800-366-1123 said their Denso SN is 5304 and the number on the plug is IK20. If ya call Auto zone looking for an IK20 you will confuse everyone you talk to so just tell them ya want a Denso SN 5304 and you will get the correct plug!! Funny thing was i said while i have it out i would just check gap and it gapped at .035 which is not spec! guess i need to fix this issue and anti-sleeze them cause the one i removed was BONE DRY!!:confused: OEM Denso SN 3297/SK20R11=$3.99 or Denso SN 5304/IK20=$9.99 seems i am not "AS"confused now but we all know that's probably wrong! hehe!!
There's your first problem....going to Autozone! lol
 

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I used some top of the line Bosch platinum in my 2000 2UZ and two of the plugs arced out of the ceramic in about 15k, those individual coils per cylinder must be hot. I now run the NGK BKR6EYA and have had no problems, I have to order them from the parts store in a box of 16 but they work great and are cheap. I would stay away from the platinum plugs since it is so easy to get to the plugs and change them.
 
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