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Discussion Starter #1
I love my new truck 5.7 4x4 DC TRD but I'm having some issues with the steering..when the road is crowned let's say to the right and I'm driving in the right lane the truck loves to follow the crown in the road badly and will veer to the right especially if I'm approaching say a red light and I start to hit my brakes you can feel the steering wheel wanting to pull to the right and if you were to let up on the steering wheel even slightly the truck and steering wheel will veer right especially when the brakes are applied, haven't tried the left lanes yet.I have owned many trucks many of them purchased new and the way this is behaving seems like a truck with 100,000+ miles on it and in need of front end work..anyone else notice this? if you haven't check it out and let me know. I hate to bring it back to the dealer and tie it up if it is just the way the truck is which is most likely the case,just my opinion but I think the steering is too soft feeling for a full size truck also it seems to have a vague on center position, again this is just my opinion. Wish there was an aftermarket steering dampener shock available but I think I heard somewhere not for the rack and pinion setup?. I still love this truck.
 

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It is very common for a new vehicle to leave the factory with the wheel alignment incorrect. Your description of your truck leads me to believe that it is WAY off.

Toyota commonly specifies very wide tolerances on camber and caster. It is my opinion that they do this simply to make it easy to produce the vehicle with the alignment "in tolerance", even though the resulting alignment is terrible.

Here is what I wrote about it in this thread almost four years ago:
Why does Toyota have slightly different specs for different variations of the vehicle? We can infer why they do, based on the specs themselves.

If you look at the specs in the Service Manual for all the different variations, you'll find differences in caster, for example, from one variation to another as small as 0.01 degrees. This is really preposterous. You can bet your last dollar that Toyota engineers did NOT say, "Yup, this variation drives better with 0.01 degrees more caster, so let's give it its own specs." NOBODY can drive a Tundra, then change caster by 0.01 degrees, then drive it again, and tell the slightest difference.

So, there has to be some other reason for the slight variations in specs. I think it has to do with manufacturing ease. Why? Look at the tolerances on camber and caster and the methods of adjusting them and it becomes obvious.

Vehicles come off U.S. assembly lines at about one per minute. Toe MUST be adjusted properly on each vehicle to make the steering wheel level when the vehicle rolls in a straight line, and to prevent tire wear, since incorrect total toe can wear tires out VERY quickly. The factories generally have five "production toe set" machines, which are VERY expensive alignment machines they use only for setting toe. Usually, one is down for maintenance and calibration while four are in operation, thus allowing four minutes per vehicle to adjust toe. It works well.

However, these machines are most definitely not suitable for adjusting camber and caster on a Tundra. Instead of doing so, I think Toyota simply sets the cams for adjusting camber and caster to "nominal" positions and relies on the wide tolerances "allowed" (+/- 0.75 degrees) to accept the resulting camber and caster values as "OK".

So, how do they arrive at the "specs" they publish?

Each variation of the vehicle has a slightly different weight and weight distribution, and some have different spring rates, so each variation "settles" to a slightly different articulation of the suspension components. I think the "specs" for camber and caster for a variation are simply the "nominal" values for camber and caster that result for that variation when the cams are set to their "nominal" positions and the vehicle is allowed to settle.

What's the significance of this? I believe the "specs" are set for the convenience of Toyota production lines and NOT for the optimum performance, stability, or safety of the vehicle.

THAT'S WHY I have recommended different "specs". Mine are within the tolerances allowed by Toyota, so Toyota has no grounds for complaint, but the vehicle is much more stable with my settings than theirs.
My recommended settings for the first generation Tundra and Sequoia have been to begin with the specs Toyota recommends for your vehicle. Set camber and total toe dead on Toyota's recommended settings. Set caster right at the upper end of the range Toyota specs allow. This provides the maximum steering stability that Toyota's specs can provide, and neither Toyota nor the alignment shop has any grounds for complaint, as these settings are within Toyota's specifications.

That being said, I have no experience at all with the new Tundras. I haven't even seen one yet.

But, I'll bet yours has very little caster. I suggest taking it to an alignment shop and have them measure it and provide you with Toyota's specs for it. It could have a lousy alignment and still be within Toyota's specs. If so, the dealer might not align it under warranty because Toyota won't pay them for doing so. So, be nice to that alignment shop -- you might need them.
 

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Which rims/tires do you have? What are your tire pressures?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have the 18 inch BF Goodrichs and the TRD aluminum wheels ..I am checking my tire pressures right now my dealer said they checked them but I'm following up with it this truck steers strange on the highway also too sensitive especially when there is any kind of cross winds
 

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So my 4x4 DC TRD doesn't seem to have the problem you describe. A few weeks ago I took it for a spin through the mountains here in Utah on a day that had some pretty bad cross winds, and also took it on some pretty bad roads and didn't notice anything.

One thing I did do right before I left was check the pressures. This was maybe 2 weeks after bought it, and supposedly the dealer had the pressure on the tires right, but when I checked they were all 30-32PSI, which is way low. So the advice to check that probalby is good.

Of course now that I think of that fact, I bet they never did calibrate the warning system right either.
 

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I felt whet you where talking about while driving on the Brooklyn Queens Express way dam near side swipe a box truck:eek:


I check the pressure last night 30 to 31 all around the max pressure is 44psi hot I drove for an hour and set the pressure at 40psi I found this help the tire wear better on the cars and the exploder I had they would wear even across the tread{ not rounded or cupped } I did not notice the problem again and i put about 100 miles on it today
 

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My 2000 Tundra pulled to the right when new, even though the alignment was correct. I replaced the Bridestones with Michelins at 15K and the pull went away. Could have been a bad tire. Even so, the wear was always even with no alignment required in 100K miles. My new Tundra has the 20" Bridgestones and they ride very smoothly, with no tracking issues.
 

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Yup, good ol' 5 ply tires :td: crappy rugged terrains:mad:

Leave 2 stripes till they are gone and put on some BF All terrains. Much better tire and good tracking. Should work well with the TRD Off Road.
 

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I love my new truck 5.7 4x4 DC TRD but I'm having some issues with the steering..when the road is crowned let's say to the right and I'm driving in the right lane the truck loves to follow the crown in the road badly and will veer to the right especially if I'm approaching say a red light and I start to hit my brakes you can feel the steering wheel wanting to pull to the right and if you were to let up on the steering wheel even slightly the truck and steering wheel will veer right especially when the brakes are applied, haven't tried the left lanes yet.
Both my '03 and '06 'Runners did/do the same thing, only we have badly rutted roads thanks to the little front wheel drive cars with studded tires. My F250 would do it, too ... on any road ... at any time. Ya had ta watch that thing like a hawk, very reminiscent of my '71 Corolla on racing tires. I'm not going to worry 'bout it 'til I've gone through the first set of tires ... let all of the suspension parts settle in. FWIW, I'm running 36 lbs all around. I think 30 and 33 is way to low. And ... always check your tire pressure cold. Don't adjust the pressure when the tires are hot. The only good thing 'bout the Rugged Terrains is that they wear out fast. LOL!
 

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ya stock tires on all model year tundras suck mine did the same thing on my 03... wouldnt suprise me if its just the tires
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the ideas and insight I may also try a rear anti sway bar to help with the highway winds moving the truck around and possibly a bed cover of some type might help a bit more. I hate these BF goodrich Rugged Tralis I just traded my 05 Ford F-150 Lariat for this Tundra last week and had dreaded steering wheel shimmy with it from day one when I bought it new I thought it was just a balance job but ended up being crap tires which could not be balanced 18inch 275 the same exact size as I have now although they ride really smooth on this truck except when they are first driven in the morning I notice a little vib in the whole truck then it quickly goes away in a few miles
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just talked to Ken at Sparks Toyota and for anyone who is interested they will have the rear sway bar in stock in May..
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My tire pressure was 30 all around which is what the door sticker says it should be. I'm going to try 35 and maybe that will tighten up the soft sidewall of these spongy BFGs, they ride nice and soft but when there is a crown in the road they seem to mush out on the sidewall and thats what my alignment shop tech thinks is causing the veering ,makes sense to me but we will see. Anyone have any suggestions other than BFGs for tires? 275 18s
 

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I have an 06' with the same exact problem. I complained enough to the dealer that eventually they changed the ball-joints and the rack & pinion. My steering problem improved but still required too much work while driving. Coming from an automotive background, I crawled under the truck and pulled on the back of the driver-side tire and watched the rack & pinion move slightly where the bushing holds it to the frame. This is an engineering flaw and will allow your steering to "shift" by itself when the road wants to pull the tires in a certain direction. I have just ordered polyurethane bushings for the rack and that should eliminate all the movement and thus "fix" the steering problem. Try having your alignment guy check to see if your rack & pinion is solidly mounted or if you have movement or look for yourself. Good Luck.
 

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My '07 DC 4X4 was wondering to the right or left depending on the road crown. I took it to the dealer and they found nothing wrong. Then I replaced the Bridgestone Dueler H/T that came with the truck at 5000 miles with Bridgestone REVO'S and the problem went away. :tu:
 

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My truck is perfect. It doesn't do that.
 

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My truck isn't perfect, but it doesn't do that either. Now that I have good tires on her, it doesn't do that even more:D
 
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