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I know the stock setup is probably the best....but has anyone tried switching to slotted/drlled rotors? Just wondering what gave you the best stopping power and fade resistance. Will be using Axxis pads and slotted/drilled rotors, but will this give me better stopping power over stock? I do tow a jetski, nothing huge
 

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There are literally hundreds of threads on here for "which is best" concerning slotted, cross-drilled, or both. Opinions vary. The search function is your friend.
 

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I know the stock setup is probably the best....but has anyone tried switching to slotted/drlled rotors? Just wondering what gave you the best stopping power and fade resistance. Will be using Axxis pads and slotted/drilled rotors, but will this give me better stopping power over stock? I do tow a jetski, nothing huge
Slotted or drilled rotors on a Tundra are just for show. Drilled rotors actually decrease stopping ability because the have less mass than solid rotors.

Don't try and second-guess the Toyota engineers. They know what they are doing. Stick with stock rotors.
 

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Unless you put bigger wheels and tires and a lift they won't be worth the money. And yes they work better the slotts and hole get rid af the heat and keep a gas pocket from forming between the pad and rotor enabling the caliper to clamp at it's highest potential. If they didn't work they wouldn't use the in auto raceing. I put them on my lifted tacoma and they made a big difference.
 

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I tow (alot) and its usually 5-6K lbs. I have the stock rotors and pads and have never warped them or had any problems.
There are many opinions, you just have to find out what works best for you.

They use drilled and slotted rotors for racing where the brakes are always hot (glowing red hot). Our brakes dont get that hot, I PERSONALLY dont feel the need for special rotors, but that is my OPINION.
 

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Comparing race components to those used in everyday driving is like comparing apples to elephant dung, it just doesn't work.
Race rotors are designed to have holes or slots, the rotors total mass is part of the equation. The rotor on your truck are not designed to have holes drilled in them. This remove mass and the mass of the rotor is what dispense the heat. Not to mention that these holes can leave the rotors vulnerable to cracking.
On a race vehicle you expect to replace pads and even rotor after every race. Do you plan on replacing your brake after each time you tow? Of course not. Keep it real and use good name brand parts and stay away from the bling. You'll be more happy with the out come.
Mike
 

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Comparing race components to those used in everyday driving is like comparing apples to elephant dung, it just doesn't work.
Race rotors are designed to have holes or slots, the rotors total mass is part of the equation. The rotor on your truck are not designed to have holes drilled in them. This remove mass and the mass of the rotor is what dispense the heat. Not to mention that these holes can leave the rotors vulnerable to cracking.
On a race vehicle you expect to replace pads and even rotor after every race. Do you plan on replacing your brake after each time you tow? Of course not. Keep it real and use good name brand parts and stay away from the bling. You'll be more happy with the out come.
Mike
Excellent point. Furthermore, racing brake components are designed to work at temperatures that would likely disintegrate normal car's components. The function of brakes is to turn kinetic energy into heat. Kinetic energy is mass times velocity squared. This means that doubling the speed will increase the kinetic energy by 4 times, which means that 4 times as much heat is generated going from 120 to a stop than 60. Race cars are doing this quite frequently, so you also have the issue of not allowing the components to cool completely before the next time they're used.

Here's an example: when heavily tracking my M3, the brake components can reach >500F, more than you'll EVER get with a pickup on an emergency stop. IMSA, Cart, F1 brakes are designed for well more than 2500F. Now, the components in those cars are also much lighter than my car meaning they can't function as much like a heat-sink. That's why they're designed to work at a much higher temperature--and hence, a braking system in an IMSA car likely costs more than a new, fully-loaded Tundra. FWIW, I use OEM vented rotors w/o holes or slots, as those aftermarket parts will usually break down much more quickly under the stress at the track.

Unless you are spending $10k to completely redesign your braking system to compensate for the lowered dissipation of the drilled rotors or that the function can be maintained to much higher temps (like with carbon fiber or ceramic components), then I would use the stock components.

There are two types of "drilled" rotors. Ones that are actually drilled, which can easily promote cracking or rotors which are forged or cast with the holes in them (ala Porsche, Ferrari, Bentley, etc.). These latter type of rotors are usually four-figures & up.

Now, one thing that MIGHT help you out is slotted rotors. Slotted rotors can help keep the pads a little more clean. If you're off-roading, the slots may help to keep the surface of the pads a little more clean.

Now, mind you that for your average, run-of-the-mill driver, I don't think that aftermarket bling will HURT your braking performance, but it won't help it either. However, with how marginal the early Tundra brakes are to start (as evidenced by the fact that larger calipers were required), you may just want to go stock to prevent future warping of rotors.
 

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I have drilled on my Tundra and slotted on my Porsche. My drilled
rotors are Brembos and were cast that way and no they were not
overly expensive. My slotted rotors are OEM and while standard
equipment on this car, are a pricey option on other models.
Neither car is a racer, but both have awesome brakes with virtually
no fade regardless of how hard either vehicle is pushed.

I can tell you from personal experience and thousands of trouble
free miles, a well engineered aftermarket brake system will
dramatically increase your Tundras stopping power - a useful
and welcome enhancement when towing or whenever you really
need it.

As mentioned in prior post, do NOT drill holes in a stock rotor. all
you will get is cracks and possibly an exploding rotor if enough metal
fatigue sets in.

My personal opinion; Stock is good but not always best.

dogger
 

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Big difference. The brakes on your Porsche was designed the way they are, Porch as Chevy is now seeing on the Corvette found out that drilled rotor are problematic. Slotted are better, less prone to problems. But As I said the Pouch and even the Vet rotors are designed to be this way.Larger with more mass to make up for the holes or slots.
On the other hand on your Tundra rotors and as on many vehicles, the engineers design these pieces on the line with just enough mass to do the job. They tend not to use extra metal as this is weight and money to manufacture. When holes are drilled or even cast by the after-market this is less material, just the same as if you machined metal off the rotor, except you have no way of measuring it.
I've seen no rotor manufater state that the add more mass to thier rotors to make up for the missing materail. Untill they do I can't see these as a safe product.
Mike
 

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"I've seen no rotor manufater state that the add more mass to thier rotors to make up for the missing materail. Untill they do I can't see these as a safe product."

Mike,

Just a couple of corrections. I can't speak for Corvette, but Porsche 911 series vehicles all come standard with cross drilled brakes. In 2002, The PCCB (Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake) option got you slotted rotors. Now, PCCB gets you cross drilled rotors once again. I can tell you that the slotted rotors have a "unique" flutter feel when you are at anything approaching full tilt (greater than 1 g braking) and the slots are hard on the pads greatly affecting pad life ($$$). Maybe that's why Porsche went back
to cross drilled rotors - I don't know.

Regarding your statement above, the cross drilled Brembos I installed at the front of my Tundra weighed exactly the same as the OEM rotors I removed. No loss of mass but much better braking and fade resistance. Out back, I shaved many pounds of unsprung weight by losing the drums at each corner which, as you know, improves handling.

I am an engineer and am involved in a risk adverse safety first profession. Speaking from that standpoint, I don't see any inherit problems, safety or otherwise with a well designed aftermarket performance brake system.

dogger
 

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If what your saying is corrected then Brembo has added extra material to make up for what's removed and I would expect that from them. Makes me feel a bit better about this.
Many off brand companies I am sure buy cheap rotors to begin with and then drill them. Another reason to stick with name brand stuff.
I have been on the Corvette forums the LS7 equipped Vetts have been having a great deal of rotor warping. We sell the US version of the Noble M400 and he see a lot of this with the drilled rotors also. I would like to go to slotted on our new version of this car but will probably stick with the drilled afor now nd work better brake venting and larger hubs into the car.
I still feel this is unneeded on street cars. The Porch, Vett and Noble are street/track vehicles and have a need for this. Most street vehicle just fill the holes with dust and then they are useless.
Mike
 

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As I sit here reading this thread I feel like I've missed something. Last Spring I was in the market for some brakes and did quite a bit of reading and the consensus at the time was that the stock Tundra brakes sucked and that the rotors were so poor and prone to warping that turning them was a waste of time and money. Consequently, almost everyone recommended a good aftermarket product.

So, I'm a bit at a loss. My rotors are "talking to me" now and will probably need to be replaced. I'd like a little more solid response as I'm going to be towing more in the coming year.

What is the consensus now?
 

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As I sit here reading this thread I feel like I've missed something. Last Spring I was in the market for some brakes and did quite a bit of reading and the consensus at the time was that the stock Tundra brakes sucked and that the rotors were so poor and prone to warping that turning them was a waste of time and money. Consequently, almost everyone recommended a good aftermarket product.

So, I'm a bit at a loss. My rotors are "talking to me" now and will probably need to be replaced. I'd like a little more solid response as I'm going to be towing more in the coming year.

What is the consensus now?
If you have a 2000, 2001, or 2002 Tundra, you should upgrade to the 2003+ brakes. There are several articles in TS on how to do it, and if you shop around, you can do it for under $500.
 

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Cyberbilly is right, you need to know which brake you have and upgrade if needed. There is nothing wrong with the stock Toyota brakes once upgraded to the 03 up design. Most problems associated with these brake are caused by poor mechanical techniques. This is not to say that even if everything is right you can't have a problem. This is life with modern vehicles. Almost every manufacture has had pulsation problems with most of their model. But these problems can be minimized when certain basic rules and details are followed. One simple one is just using a torque wrench on the lug nuts and never tightening them with an impact, for example.
Mike
 

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Brake rotors warp due to residual stresses from cyclic heating and cooling. Rotors on well designed brakes systems handle these cycles and do not warp under normal operating conditions. OEM Tundra rotors are apparently inadequately designed, otherwise they wouldn't warp under normal usage. Evidence from thousands of Tundra owners have would validate this hypothesis. (My 2012 Tundra is yet another validation, rotors warped in less than 50K miles.)

If you have had trouble with the stock rotors under normal use, why would anyone think putting in another OEM rotor would be any better? (See definition of insanity: Repeating the same behavior and expecting a different result.) Aftermarket brakes (slotted/drilled/solid) could be designed better. My money is better spent the second time around on a premium replacement rotor (slotted, drilled or solid) from a reputable aftermarket supplier with a lifetime warranty over the OEM rotor that failed once already. :) Drilled and slotted rotors are intended to manage heating, cooling and loading. Obviously leading engineers in high performance automotive segments believe they work. I wouldn't disagree with them.

Nathan
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As I sit here reading this thread I feel like I've missed something. Last Spring I was in the market for some brakes and did quite a bit of reading and the consensus at the time was that the stock Tundra brakes sucked and that the rotors were so poor and prone to warping that turning them was a waste of time and money. Consequently, almost everyone recommended a good aftermarket product.

So, I'm a bit at a loss. My rotors are "talking to me" now and will probably need to be replaced. I'd like a little more solid response as I'm going to be towing more in the coming year.

What is the consensus now?
I have a 1794 edition 2016 Toyota Tundra and have owned Tundras since the 1st year they were made. The OEM brakes for Tundra are not manufactured for a vehicle od this size. I have ALWAYS purchased drilled and slotted brakes for my Tundras. The OEM brakes tend to have a short life span and warp easily and is definitely not worth turning. The drilled and slotted brakes have premium stopping power and allow for the heat to dispense more quickly keeping your brakes from warping. The drilled and slotted brakes are designed and manufactured to prevent warping and cracking and most have a lifetime warranty against such defects. There are many different designs and brands for drilled and slotted brakes. I recommend only using Americsn made and make sure you purchase the design specifically for what you use your vehicle for. They make street performance (the name says it all) made for city and freeway driving. They also make drilled and slotted for towing, off roading, or if you just have a tendency to use your brakes more often. If you are going off roading and towing, I would suggest premium dimpled and slotted as they dissipate dirt and dust more easily to keep your brake pads free from debris. Drilled and slotted rotors are not much more than OEM rotors but they are definitely worth the extra change. You have read a lot of comments from both sides of the spectrum. I would suggest trying the drilled and slotted and see for yourself. Since you said you need new rotors, what would it hurt to try both? You've seen the performance of OEM, now you can test the performance of aftermarket drilled and slotted.
 
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