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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes I searched.

Has there been any performance testing using a straight pipe after the cat? I've always heard straight pipes will lose back pressure, but perhaps if it's after the cat it would be okay. I am looking for dyno results basically on a stock Tundra vs one with straight pipes after the cats.

Thanks in advance.
 

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I don't think I have seen any dynos on this. I know that gains would probably be minimal. There have been at least a couple of people running straight pipes. The powersticks are a straight through design. If you end up running straight pipes, use 2 1/4" as that will maintain stock backpressure
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't think I have seen any dynos on this. I know that gains would probably be minimal. There have been at least a couple of people running straight pipes. The powersticks are a straight through design. If you end up running straight pipes, use 2 1/4" as that will maintain stock backpressure
Not so much interested in performance gains as the sound. I want a traditional V8 rumble without losing power basically. The Corsa Sport exhaust sounds the best to me out of the "out of the box" options, but it's pretty expensive. I figured straight pipes with a couple tips would be the cheapest way to go for the sound, but I don't want to sacrifice any power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You could always have straight pipes run and add a mufflers after the fact. That way you already have the basic setup and if you don't like it, add something to it and re-evaluate.
True. Thanks for the input. I just read several threads on TS about the powersticks and have mixed opinions. The main thing that worries me about all the exhaust systems, is no one seems to be doing dynos before and after. A better sound isn't worth much loss in power to me.
 

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If you wait long enough I am sure other members will chime in. I think the main issue is maintaining the stock pipe diameters. I know the stock exhaust runs two 2-1/8" pipes most of the way to the muffler and just before the inlet it flares to about 2-1/4". The muffler exit is between 3"-3 1/4". If you do the math, the volume for two 2 1/4" is almost the same as the single 3".
 

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at lower rpm exhaust travels down the tubing in pulses. If you get a perforated muffler/mufflers with a properly sized canister the pulse expands into the canister. As it expands into the canister, this causes it to slow substantially. The next pulse hits the previous pulse, then the next, etc. This backpressure on the low end acts like smaller pipes causing scavenging. As the rpm's increase the pressure in the canister increases. Once the pressure in the canister is equal to the pressure in the exhaust tubing instead of expanding into the canister and slowing, the exhaust flows straight out the back:first:

The canister sizing is crucial for proper scavenging. Here is an excellent description about the different types of mufflers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
at lower rpm exhaust travels down the tubing in pulses. If you get a perforated muffler/mufflers with a properly sized canister the pulse expands into the canister. As it expands into the canister, this causes it to slow substantially. The next pulse hits the previous pulse, then the next, etc. This backpressure on the low end acts like smaller pipes causing scavenging. As the rpm's increase the pressure in the canister increases. Once the pressure in the canister is equal to the pressure in the exhaust tubing instead of expanding into the canister and slowing, the exhaust flows straight out the back:first:

The canister sizing is crucial for proper scavenging. Here is an excellent description about the different types of mufflers.
I actually read that article that other day. I think you had posted it in another thread. It is interesting. After reading quite a bit, I think I'm just going to go for the corsa sport and call it a day. It's expensive, but all the owners seem to be happy, and you don't have to piece anything together yourself. Exhaust-in-a-box. :tu:
 
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