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In case anyone else runs into this, wanted to post a successful diagnostic and fix for blinking Airbag light due to B0131 error - Open in P/T Squib RH Circuit.

The key to fixing this was having a multi-meter and taking a chance and buying a junkyard Airbag Assembly Module. The module is a key thing I wanted to point out, as some warn that airbag computers are married to your cars VIN number, requiring special programming from the dealer. I took a chance and bought a $60 used part and found out this was not the case with this generation of 2001 Sequoia. Although you may have to clear residual codes if the previous truck had them.

Following the toyota diagnostic procedure for error B0131, located in several places on the internet, like here: https://pdfslide.net/documents/di6pk02-dtc-b013164-open-in-pt-squib-rh-spyderrepair-informationrepairdtc.html , I was able to confirm the wiring from the module to the seat belt pretensioner was good and had good continuity. It also allowed me to rule out that the pretensioner was not at fault in the test where you jump the two connector ends together. To do these tests, you will need to remove the center console and seat belt trim pieces to access the two connectors. Instructions for the console is located here: https://www.toyotaguru.us/sequoia-2001-repair/note-if-instrument-panel-or-instrument-panel-reinforcement-is-deformed-or-cracked-replace-with-new-part.html . Steps for removing the passenger seat belt trim and disconnecting the pretensioner wire are these:

1. Remove the 5 screws and front door scuff plate.

2. Remove the front pillar garnish.
Using a screwdriver, remove the caps. HINT: Tape the screwdriver tip before use.
Using a torx driver, remove the torx screws and assist grip. Torx driver: T30 (Part No. 09041-00030 or locally manufactured tool)

3. Using a screwdriver, remove the front pillar garnish. HINT: Tape the screwdriver tip before use.

4. Using a screwdriver, remove the back panel upper garnish. HINT: Tape the screwdriver tip before use.
Remove the bolt and front seat outer belt floor anchor.

5. Remove the quarter trim.
Using a screwdriver, remove the quarter trim belt hole cover. HINT: Tape the screwdriver tip before use.

6. Using a screwdriver, remove the cap. HINT: Tape the screwdriver tip before use.
Remove the bolt and front seat outer belt shoulder anchor.

7. Using a screwdriver, remove the quarter trim. HINT: Tape the screwdriver tip before use.
Remove the retractor of front seat outer belt. CAUTION: Never disassemble the front seat outer belt. NOTE: When removing the retractor of front seat outer belt, take care not to pull the seat belt pretensioner wire harness.

8. Disconnect the pretensioner connector as shown in the illustration. CAUTION: When removing the seat belt pretensioner, work must be started 90 seconds after the ignition switch is turned to the "LOCK" position and the negative (-) terminal cable is disconnected from the battery.
Note: the yellow connector has a metal lock over it. Just flip it up. It is just a lever. The connector may need a little prying with a small flathead screwdriver. I just pops off the round pretensioner part.


Again, after taking a chance a buying a junkyard Airbag module (computer) , the issue was indeed a broken module and replacing it fixed the issue. I did try taking apart the module and cleaning the circuit board, but this didn't help. Since this looks to be a rare issue with this model of Sequoia and very little posts on this, plus Haynes manuals defer from anything with Airbags and the SRS system, I thought I would share this information for others. The big takeaway is that you can replace the module without special programming for your VIN number, so you can do it yourself and avoid the dealer. Note that you must match the Module part number, and they can vary in the same generation of vehicle due to those with/without side airbags.
 

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I have a 2000 Chevy Impala with about 137k miles, owned since it was brand new. Anyways, for the past few years the airbag light has been lit, turning off sometimes for maybe a few minutes during a long drive, but never fails to come back. OBD reads "Open Circuit." Now my question is- will the airbags deploy in an accident? If not, how expensive is something like this to repair?
 

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My brother has a newer Nissan Altima. His airbag light has been burning bright for at least a year. The dealership that scanned the codes said that the airbag computer module failed and needed to be replaced. They also said that the module controlled all of the airbags and the whole system was disabled. Each car's systems are different, and your situation may be different, but it's probably safe to say all the airbags would be disabled to prevent accidental activation.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Did your light blink all the time? Or just occasionally? Also, what did you use to read the code?
At first it blinked occasionally sometimes after bumps. Eventually it blinked almost all the time. I bought a Zurich ZR13 scanner that is able to read SRS and ABS codes to pinpoint where the problem was
 

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I have a 2000 Chevy Impala with about 137k miles, owned since it was brand new. Anyways, for the past few years the airbag light has been lit, turning off sometimes for maybe a few minutes during a long drive, but never fails to come back. OBD reads "Open Circuit." Now my question is- will the airbags deploy in an accident? If not, how expensive is something like this to repair?
The Toyota dealers will charge a minimum of $150 just to read the code and tell you what the issue is. In the worst cases, some have reported the dealer just wanted to replace the Seat Belt Pretensioner or the Airbag Module, or both, sending the bill to over $1500.
 
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