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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking about raising my '04 Tundra 1 or 2 inches. Any suggestions? I don't want to spend too much (<$500). I was thinking about spacers in the front (the ones that mount on top of the struts) and blocks in the back. I also don't want to compromise the ride quality too much.
 

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Spacers are fine :tu: or you can go with a set of coils like I did. Check out my Gallery and this WRITE UP, which I did on installing my coils. As for the rear blocks, I'd steer south of those things and possibly opt instead for a set of AAL's (i.e. Add-A-Leafs) Personally, I think the ride is much better with AAL's than what you'll get with blocks. But the choice is ultimately yours. ;) Good luck...
 

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...I just finished reading your write - great stuff, thanks!

Question: If you disconnected the lower ball joint and dropped the lower control arm, can you avoid using the spring compressors and those deep scratches on the new coils? (just curious)

I'm due for the lower ball joint campain replacement and maybe while they have everything apart, this would be the time to get the longer springs and lose the factory nose dip on my truck...
 

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...I just finished reading your write - great stuff, thanks!

Question: If you disconnected the lower ball joint and dropped the lower control arm, can you avoid using the spring compressors and those deep scratches on the new coils? (just curious)

I'm due for the lower ball joint campain replacement and maybe while they have everything apart, this would be the time to get the longer springs and lose the factory nose dip on my truck...
Truth is, disconnecting the lower ball joint and dropping the control arm isn't going to do anything, in regards to "helping" with the replacement of a set of coil springs. Although it's all part of the front suspension, one has little to do with the other, when it comes to replacing coil springs. The the issue of having to "disassemble" the coilover assembly to get the shock out, so you can reuse it with a set of longer coils, will STILL have to be done... seperately.

My advice would be, to take the coilover assembly to a reputable shop and have them switch out the springs for you. I think it's a cost of about $30 plus. In hind sight, I wish I'd done that instead of using the manual spring compressor, which I used! At least the "scratches" would have been at a bare minimum that way, if any at all. :cry: As it was though, I ended up having to repaint my coils before I installed the coilover assembly back on the truck.

As for having it done while your truck is in for the ball joint recall, that would be a good time to get it done. That way you're not having to do any of the work. All you'll have to do is ask for the coilover assemblies once the dealership removes them, and take them to a shop that can replace the stock coils with a set of longer ones.

NOTE: YOU NEED TO KEEP IN MIND THOUGH, THAT AN ALIGNMENT IS DEFINATELY GOING HAVE TO BE DONE EITHER WAY. SO MAKE SURE THE NEW COILOVERS ARE IN PLACE BEFORE THEY ALIGN YOUR TRUCK. ;)

Hope this helps...
 

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check out extremetrucktoys.com they have level lift kits at a great price i just ordered one and installed it the installation was very easy done in under two hours i ordered the 3" level lift kit with diff drop and aal's for $185.00 including shipping and i was able to put 295/70/17 which is 33.5x12.5 and doesn't rub check out my pics in my gallery i'm very pleased with the kit just couldn't believe the price how cheap it was it comes with detailed instructions and all the hardware good luck
 

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Truth is, disconnecting the lower ball joint and dropping the control arm isn't going to do anything, in regards to "helping" with the replacement of a set of coil springs. Although it's all part of the front suspension, one has little to do with the other, when it comes to replacing coil springs. The the issue of having to "disassemble" the coilover assembly to get the shock out, so you can reuse it with a set of longer coils, will STILL have to be done... seperately.

My advice would be, to take the coilover assembly to a reputable shop and have them switch out the springs for you. I think it's a cost of about $30 plus. In hind sight, I wish I'd done that instead of using the manual spring compressor, which I used! At least the "scratches" would have been at a bare minimum that way, if any at all. :cry: As it was though, I ended up having to repaint my coils before I installed the coilover assembly back on the truck.

As for having it done while your truck is in for the ball joint recall, that would be a good time to get it done. That way you're not having to do any of the work. All you'll have to do is ask for the coilover assemblies once the dealership removes them, and take them to a shop that can replace the stock coils with a set of longer ones.

NOTE: YOU NEED TO KEEP IN MIND THOUGH, THAT AN ALIGNMENT IS DEFINATELY GOING HAVE TO BE DONE EITHER WAY. SO MAKE SURE THE NEW COILOVERS ARE IN PLACE BEFORE THEY ALIGN YOUR TRUCK. ;)

Hope this helps...
Thanks - I guess I'm not fully tracking... the tundra oem chassis (front suspension) does not have coilovers (not like the one-piece units from Donohoe). It's springs and shocks - two separate units.

With the frame supported, and a jack under the lower control arm, when the lower ball joint is removed and you s-l-o-w-l-y let the jack down under the lower control arm, the shock (after you take the bolts out) and spring should drop on out... I'm not being arguementitive, and I'm not a tech, but Looking at this drawing of a standard lower control arm setup I'm just not tracking... I think typically getting the lower ball joint apart is a lot of work and spring compressors are easier and faster.

I sent an email to Wheelers asking about their longer coils - no reply yet.
 

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this will cost more then $500.00 Toyota Tundra Long Travel
Functional as heck, but equally ugly with the 7" width increase, re: "The vehicles overall track width increases 7", fiberglass fenders are recommended." ...just the same, I totally respect the talent at Total Chaos. :tu:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok, so back to my original post....How about 2" spacers for the front and 2" lift AAL's for the rear? Or do I want a slightly higher raise (3") in the front to level the truck? I would rather not buy larger tires. I just want the raised look. If I do 3" front, 2" rear, will it look ok with the stock tires (265/65/17 I think)? Can someone show me some pics of their lifted Tundra (2WD preferably).
 

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You probably won't get a response back from Wheeler's Off-Road regarding the coils, as they no longer offer their coils! :cry: They do however, offer the AAL's though... :tu:.

Oh yeah, after looking at the diagram, I'm assuming your truck's front suspension is like the set-up on the left in the diagram. If so... my next question is... is your truck 2WD or 4WD?
 

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You probably won't get a response back from Wheeler's Off-Road regarding the coils, as they no longer offer their coils! :cry: They do however, offer the AAL's though... :tu:.

Oh yeah, after looking at the diagram, I'm assuming your truck's front suspension is like the set-up on the left in the diagram. If so... my next question is... is your truck 2WD or 4WD?
:eek: Where's the icon for Guy-With-Egg-On-Face? ...wow, did I have my wires crossed. Thanks for not ripping me a new one.

After actually getting off my butt and putting my head near the wheel well and opening my eyes, sure enough, this thing has struts. The springs don't go to the lower control arm, they stop on a perch that is fastened to the strut/shock. A light should have gone on when the aftermarket guys were selling coilovers. Doh!

This is a 2WD, and it doesn't look 100% like either drawing - it's closer to the left image of a conventional spring and shock design. Instead of the spring going from the lower control arm to the upper frame mount, the bottom end of the spring rests on the strut perch.

Geesch, maybe I should stick to pulling weeds!

:eek: Appologies to mossman77 and hijacking his spacer thread/original post.
 
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