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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I'll be honest... I'm never really fully understood tire sizes/widths.

Anyways, winter is around the corner. I plan on buying a SureTrax water bladder for the back of the truck for some extra weight.... beats sand bags.... but I also want to get a good set of winter tires.

My truck currently has 255/70/R18 tires. I know I can find some tires that fit the existing rims but I'm looking for some tires that are not as wide for winter time.

I haven't driven the truck in snow yet but the tires look like they'll be a good set of skis! :) I want to purchase some plain black rims with the new tires. That way seasonal swaps are a breeze.

What tires size/rim size can I move to? I know I can go into any tire shop and they can help me but I wanted to ping the experts on here first and get some no BS responses....

Any good place to get cheap rims? I'm looking for rims in the $50-75 (per rim).

Any input?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Those are great links but from what I've read its talking about people buying tires that fit on their existing rims. I'm looking for tires that aren't as wide as the stock. So I'm willing to go down to 16 or even 17" for my winter tires (if I can).

My father had 4x4 Silverado years ago and the thing drove like it had skates on it; even with winter tires. He finally purchased some different rims and moved down to some smaller tires for winter and the problem was solved.

I'm looking for advice on doing this....

thanks
 

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A 16 inch rim is to small for the brake size; the smallest rim size would have to be a 17. You could then go with like a 245/75/17 which is slightly narrow and shorter than the stock tire. Another problem might be finding rims in that price range with the correct lug pattern and still able to clear the brakes. I saw in other posts that there is very few 17 inch rims that actually clear the brakes. You might be better sticking with a set of stock 18 inch steel wheels and just finding a good set of snow tires so you can still change out. There are probably some stock rims for sale on here, or one of the online ad sites.
 

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Best bet is to buy some 18" take-offs from a dealer or E-bay. As for width, if you're traveling in lots of deep snow you want narrower to cut through the snow and get bite....if you're area is less big snowfall and more ice/hard packed snow stay with the OEM width, you get a bigger contact patch.
 

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I have Bridgestone Blizzak DM-Z3 on the stock 18" steel rims. I believe the tire size is 265/65R-18 but I will verify later today. They are true to the Bridgestone ads....they really do stick to ice. Phenomenal winter performance. :tu:
 

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I've got a set of 4 brand new Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V1 (replacement for DM-Z3) still sitting in the back of my truck on a set of take-off 20's I got when I picked up my truck on Friday. Suppose to be even better tna the DM-Z's on ice. Don't ask how much they were......
 

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whats snow?
 

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Why thinner tires? Is this better for the snow? Forgive me but I live in the lower California desert and would know what snow looked like.
 

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Why thinner tires? Is this better for the snow? Forgive me but I live in the lower California desert and would know what snow looked like.
cuts through snow easier instead of riding on top of it pckign it down....like wearing ice skates vs clown shoes and trying to go thorugh snow with directional control of any kind...
 

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I faced the same problem, plus the stock tires this truck came with felt wobbly, didn't have the long-term weight hauling capacity I wanted, were potential side blow-out candidates on rocky logging roads, and had zero snow capacity. So those BFG ragged trails sit unused in my garage (maybe to put on when I finally sell the truck, so the buyer will think "wow, new tires!".
The BFG AT KO at 265/65 18 are slightly narrower than stock and perform well in snow, OK on ice, great off road, towing is a breeze, and at 40,000 miles still have enough tread left to easily get me through this winter. I know I'm not alone in the experience with these tires, although some have complained of rapid tread wear and others find the ride unacceptably rough.
 

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You are going to have a hard time finding steelies that will fit your truck.

That said, I would start scouring Craigslist in your area, and ebay. I recently upgraded to the OEM 20" wheels, and sold my stock 18" TRD wheels with the crappy BF's on CL for about $300 if I recall.

You can still go to a narrower tire, but I wouldn't recommend dropping down in diameter much. Check out Tire Rack - Your performance experts for tires and wheels and build a package there. They have a wealth of user reviews and ratings, which will help you make your decisions.

Good luck!!

And btw, you're right. The stock tires are junk and perform terrible in the snow.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I wouldn't waste your time with a water bladder or sandbags with your 4x4. Unnecessary.
I disagree... I thought so as well at one time until I took my Taco (when I had it) to work during an ice storm a few years back. My wife and I decided it was the safer vehicle and so we carpooled that morning. I had it in 4-high, stock tires, no weight in the back, and I was driving more then half the speed limit. My back tires lost traction first and come around front. Once they did the front tires also lost complete traction. The problem is even with 4 wheel drive once all your tires have lost traction with the snow/ice you now have 4 tires spinning; none of them benefiting you.

After that I put 400# of sand bags right over the back tires in the bed and did not had problems in similar situations/storms. I'm not arguing against 4x4; it definitely helps (and I own one) but so does some addition weight in the back of the truck... cheap piece of mind IMO

Of course, I didn't have winter tires at the time either....
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for the responses... I'm still not clear what I will do. Maybe it is time for me to just go into a tire shop and start discussing it with them. Maybe it's for me to buy a nice of rims for my summer tires and use the stock 18" steel wheels for winter! ;)
 

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I also put weight in the back with 4x4 and winter tires. Simply put, it helps a lot. Winters can be pretty brutal up here. Every improvement is welcome.
 

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You are right to go thinner tires for winter. And a stock size tire is already available. You really will have to stick with 18" and the 5 spoke steel wheels are the best option. You don't have to run around all winter with black rims. So 255/70-18 is your best bet.
I have an extra set of steelies if you are interested.
Blizzaks are good for the first half of tread then no so much afterwards.
I have my plan for the Northeast winters and I will be doing it 2wd
 
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