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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I tried to pass an impassible pass yesterday at the hunt club...and had to back out.

I am running an 04 Tundra Limited 4WD with Copper Zeon LTZ 275/55/20 with the deep 6 Enkei's. Tried to hug the outside edge of a 2 foot clay rut, but slid off. I was at road pressure.

What would be be best 'start' pressure for something like that? Is there standard to start with or a percentage?

Thanks,

CB>
 

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Honestly with 55 series 20's you're not gonna gain much by airing down. You simply have NO sidewall to get to flex.


I'd start with a simple chalk test on pavement and determine your optimum onroad pressure first. Than based on that number decide how low you're willing to go. Remember once you change tires, wheels or weight that sticker in the doorjamb becomes meaningless.
 

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A 55% aspect ratio tire does not belong in severe offroad situations. The internal structure of the tire is designed for a narrow range of operating pressures. Attempting to "air down" these tires will destroy them and damage your rim in the process.

In other words: if you're going to the dirt, get yourself a 16"-17" wheel and a more appropriate tire.
 

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In a heavy vehicle you want tall skinny tires for off roading in anything but sand. You also want as low a gear as possible and add as
little power as possible in most situations. Sand is opposite, if you start getting stuck you give it about all it's got. So in a nutshell, wide
tires suck for what you are trying to do. We run 245/75 winter and offroad tires up here instead of the 265/70-16's. Same factory height
and just a bit narrower. Somehow in the years of wanting to look good and watching specialty offroad vehicles a lot has been lost on how
to set up a street vehicle to work well offroad.
 

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In a heavy vehicle you want tall skinny tires for off roading in anything but sand. You also want as low a gear as possible and add as
little power as possible in most situations.
Having BTDT Time and time again I strongly disagree with the skinny tires are better myth

Skinny tires have less traction and a smaller footprint both disadvantages on anything less than pavement they might be better in snow but that'd be it ,as to power sometimes there's no cure for good old fashoned wheel speed and momentum when trying to get up something. I know my Jeep saw WOT in 2nd LOW range a couple times during yesterdays wet-n-wild wheeling expedition

In my opinion the OP completely negated the benefit of owning a 4x4 when he bought "cool" rims
 

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And your post is exactly what has been lost over time. Me a all my friends were 4x4 from back in the 60's and used them for hunting
not for just the sake of thrashing. I was the guy most would come get when they got stuck. I drove circles around trucks in my
42 Ford jeep laughing at them stuck in the mud. But you can do it your way, no matter to me.
 

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And your post is exactly what has been lost over time. Me a all my friends were 4x4 from back in the 60's and used them for hunting
not for just the sake of thrashing. I was the guy most would come get when they got stuck. I drove circles around trucks in my
42 Ford jeep laughing at them stuck in the mud. But you can do it your way, no matter to me.

You can think what you want but todays even mildly built jeeps with wider tires and flexible suspensions will drive right through and over stuff that would have your swimming away from your old 2a. Comparing crappy 4x4 setups from the 60's with open diffs and NO suspension articulation at both ends and to todays rigs isn't really worth commenting on as the level of capability is so far advanced much like comparing an 80's cray to a new notebook

Go wheeling with a group today's of serious hobbyists and you'll be amazed at what it's possible to get a vehicle up or through. Nothing's been lost it's just what you thought was rugged situation is just a drive in the country now and skinny tires won't cut the mustard on what's considered a tough trail today
 

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You didn't read my post. I made it very clear I was talking about daily drivers not specialty rigs. And you somehow have the idea
I quit updating in the 60's? You get stuck or break your gear where we go you leave your truck till spring. You are out playing, it's a little more serious up here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, I bought this truck as my daily driver, but I wanted a 4WD to do a little trail riding and off roading. I did not realize before I bought the truck with the 20's that they were not ideal for off roading. It needed new tires and I started looking into lifts, but decided I would not get the full benefit unless I downsized the rims and I just couldnt do both right now. So I just put on the tires I felt were best for my setup. I may lift and change rims down the road. I am not looking for 'severe' off-road challenges (yet). But I would like to know how to optimally run my current set up in GA clay and mud ruts.

Thanks Krochus, i'll give that a try.

CB.
 

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For the weight of our trucks, I wouldn't go under 20 psi. I run 30 psi on the road and 20 psi off.
 

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I run 20 PSI on the trail. On the road about 30-32 PSI.
 

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I run 40psi with my YOKOS on the road and 20psi OFF.

IMO, Yes, the skinnier tires help so much especially sand dunes. Less tread to bury itself. We have had skinnier tires for our off-road vehicles for many years and they have proven themsleves to us, so for us and our opinion we will continue to use the skinnier tires for our off-road trucks.
 

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i feel like a rebel when i go 15 front 12 rear. 18 is nice middle ground.
I've ran mine that low, but I can almost make my rims touch the rocks when I'm really twisted up. I've found that my tires (KM2's) have a sweet spot at 20 psi for sidewall protection and traction, I used to run them lower until the guy who designed them told me to run them at 20 psi like he intended for them to be ran at. Some other tires like to be ran in the lower ranges though.
 

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I've ran mine that low, but I can almost make my rims touch the rocks when I'm really twisted up. I've found that my tires (KM2's) have a sweet spot at 20 psi for sidewall protection and traction, I used to run them lower until the guy who designed them told me to run them at 20 psi like he intended for them to be ran at. Some other tires like to be ran in the lower ranges though.
That's great info. I'll have to begin experimenting.
 

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On stock rims, anything under 15# and you risk losing your bead, like me. Luckily the nearest air station was only 2 miles away..... I now carry my own MF-1050 so that shouldn't be a problem again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks guys! Looks like 20 PSI is a good place to start.

CB.
 
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