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tire pressure light has been flashing for six months! checked all the tires and the spare when it first started and all is fine. finally get some new tires last week and my tire guy finds one broken inside the tire! my question is if i get a new sensor and have my tire guy install it does the computer need to be reset? do i have to take it to the dealer for them to fix the problem? or u think i can do it myself?
thanks!

1st post here! thanks for all the great info! i have learned alot in just a couple hours reading all the threads :ts:
 

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Just get the new sensor installed - Set all the pressures on the other tires to whatever pressure you want and then just hold the reset button on the bottom of the dash by the steering column - Let it flash 3 times and you should be just fine.
 

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Not true unless the factory manual is wrong. Each of the five sensors has an address which must be recognized by the ECM for the TPMS to work correctly (that is, so that the light stops flashing). A new sensor must be identified to the ECM using the dealer's scan tool (or an equivalent; I believe that some of the better independent shops now have something that can interface with the vehicle's ECM to register the sensors).
 

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Just get the new sensor installed - Set all the pressures on the other tires to whatever pressure you want and then just hold the reset button on the bottom of the dash by the steering column - Let it flash 3 times and you should be just fine.

thanks! thats what i thought! i just didn't know if a new sensor had to be programed or something with the computer that only the dealer could do! i called the dealer and they said bring it in! $112.00 for sensor and $199.00 to install! just trying to save some $.


:ts:
 

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Not true unless the factory manual is wrong. Each of the five sensors has an address which must be recognized by the ECM for the TPMS to work correctly (that is, so that the light stops flashing). A new sensor must be identified to the ECM using the dealer's scan tool (or an equivalent; I believe that some of the better independent shops now have something that can interface with the vehicle's ECM to register the sensors).
thanks for the info i will look into it! im ready to put a piece of black tape over the damn flashing light!
 

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. . . my tire guy finds one broken inside the tire . . .
Unless this was the first time the tire had ever been off the rim (or perhaps run while flat), it sounds like the last person who worked on your tire(s) may deserve some credit :devil: for the broken sensor. Did you have tire work done shortly before the flashing began?

JMO, re: putting tape over a flashing warning indicator--kinda like saying to cover up your monitor so you don't have to see any warnings :eek: about malfunctions if they keep showing up on your PC. I've seen plenty of people who just ignore those messages, but that was usually the reason I'd been called (often too late) to fix "a problem".
 

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I would imagine that the flashing light would be more annoying. Mine just stays on.
 

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Seems a flashing indicator would point to a malfunctioning system, not a low pressure situation. FWIW, I do support the recommendation for regular pressure checks with a good quality gauge, but I also appreciate the added value of the monitoring system.
 

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I had a problem with one of my sensors. It reads 14 lb when the tire has 35 lb in it. I took it to Smithtown Toyota on long island NY. First they told me I only had 14 lbs of air in the tire. I checked it before it went in and it had 35lbs. then they told me someone changed the tires because Toyotas don’t come with firestone tires. The date code on the tire is Oct 05 and the truck was built Nov 05. When they checked the sensor they said it wasn’t covered by the warranty. They said that the sensor was damaged. It would cost $396 to change it. Then they said the good news is that there is a service bulletin on my tires and I would get new tires. I told them that I didn’t want to fix the sensor. So now they don’t want to do the tires. I asked why the sensor is so much when it retails for $112 and takes ½ hr to install and program. They told me it takes 3 hrs. They charged me $102 for a diagnostic charge on my in warranty truck. They said the tire was losing air. Said I must have picked up a nail. They replaced the one tire with the bad sensor. When I went behind the shop to get my truck I saw my old tire sitting there. They ripped the bead on the tire taking it off the rim to check the sensor. There was no nail in it. I think there should be a class action suit on these sensors. Only Toyota dealers can service your wheels and program these sensors. Other car companies have sensors that any auto shop can service. I still have the flashing light on my dash.
 
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