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my dealer wants $19.99 to rotate my tires every 5000 miles. they say i have to do it there to keep my warranty. am i getting the shaft?
 

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my dealer wants $19.99 to rotate my tires every 5000 miles. they say i have to do it there to keep my warranty. am i getting the shaft?
My dealer wants $22.00 to rotate. Yeah, I think we're getting the shaft. They told me the rotations had to be made within 500 miles of the 5000 mark everytime and had to be done by them for the 100,000 miles tire warranty. I'll just rotate my own tires and buy new ones when I need them. This is one of those Gulf States Toyota add ons that cost up front but isn't worth a dime.
 

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tires are not covered by warranty anyways. does not matter if it was a blowout or a flat, they are not covered because they are a "wearing item".
 

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do your self a floor jack and some jack stands and 20mins later your done
 

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my dealer wants $19.99 to rotate my tires every 5000 miles. they say i have to do it there to keep my warranty. am i getting the shaft?
If YOU let them they will like you!! OEM tires will only get around 30K and if you could afford to upgrade i would recommed it ASAP! as long as you document your DIY Maintenance they will have no leg to hobble on when it comes to most DIY maintenance/warranty claims!! Save all oil, filter, lube reciepts and have yourself a journal on what ya did and when ya did it! Torque wrenches are cheap and 83 Ft Lb on 06 DC lug nuts can be done by most!!
 

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tires are not covered by warranty anyways. does not matter if it was a blowout or a flat, they are not covered because they are a "wearing item".
Some are. Both of my Toyotas came with the 100K tire warranty under the Extra Mile package. Toyota will reimburse up to $200 a tire due to failure or premature wear. I get free oil changes with my Toy's and the $15 rotation with the free oil is worth it to me.
 

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do your self a floor jack and some jack stands and 20mins later your done
I've always done my own oil changes and tire rotations. But, when you buy a new truck and pay for option package C (not negotiable) that includes 100K /6 year tire warranty, it's worth a look and some calculations to see if it's beneficial to you. In 100K miles, I'd rotate tires 20 times at $22 a pop is $440.00 max payout. Not bad when you know the tires won't last 100K. The kicker for me is that I'm liable to be anywhere in OK or Tx when my mileage comes up and I also don't have time (don't want to take the time) to have my tires rotated by the dealer. The last time I let someone rotate my tires they cross threaded a lug nut and hammered it on with an impact. I didn't find out about it until I had a flat and had to tow the truck in because the stud was stripped and I had to split the nut. For some people this is a good deal, for me, it's not. I've also got a glove box full of free oil change coupons. Too bad they have my VIN number on them or I'd give them to someone that'd use them.

I'll do the rotations myself, document with pictures of odometer and the truck with all the tires off, add it to My Toyota records, and see what happens when I try to collect on the warranty! :devil:
 

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Any of you "do-it-yourselfers" know the proper rotation for tires? I've heard... (front-to-back/back-to-front on the same side) and then the (criscrossing pattern front-to-back). Which one is right?

Anybody know? :confused:
 

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I have always used the "Modified X" rotation. The rear tires move straight to the front, and the front tires cross to the rear.

There are good reasons for using this pattern. Primarily, each tire spends the same amount of miles on each end and on each side of the vehicle, which makes the wear much more uniform.

In more detail, though, consider what happens to a tire on the front. It experiences at least four times the braking force as tires on the rear, which tends to wear the tread lugs such that the forward edge is rounded and the trailing edge is feathered. It's easy to see and to feel; just rub your hands fore-and-aft along the tread surface. Moving a front tire to the opposite rear position stops that wear and begins to reverse it, but it does so much more gently than by simply swapping it to the opposite front position. After it has reversed a bit, the next rotation moves it to the front position on the same side, and the wear reverses. The net effect is even wear overall without extreme wear at any given time.

My wife's Sequoia has 44,000 miles on a set of Michelin LTX M/S in P265/70R16. They are wearing quite evenly and should reach the wear indicators after 120,000 miles of use.
 

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I have an '05 4x4 Access Cab. Page 450 of my owner's guide shows a "back to front" rotation pattern. The tires are not swapped side to side.
 

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Listen to DJ. That's all you need to know :)
 

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I have always used the "Modified X" rotation. The rear tires move straight to the front, and the front tires cross to the rear.

There are good reasons for using this pattern. Primarily, each tire spends the same amount of miles on each end and on each side of the vehicle, which makes the wear much more uniform.

In more detail, though, consider what happens to a tire on the front. It experiences at least four times the braking force as tires on the rear, which tends to wear the tread lugs such that the forward edge is rounded and the trailing edge is feathered. It's easy to see and to feel; just rub your hands fore-and-aft along the tread surface. Moving a front tire to the opposite rear position stops that wear and begins to reverse it, but it does so much more gently than by simply swapping it to the opposite front position. After it has reversed a bit, the next rotation moves it to the front position on the same side, and the wear reverses. The net effect is even wear overall without extreme wear at any given time.

My wife's Sequoia has 44,000 miles on a set of Michelin LTX M/S in P265/70R16. They are wearing quite evenly and should reach the wear indicators after 120,000 miles of use.
:ts: DJ... That's exactly what I did.

MAN! Is this website awesome or what?! :D:tu:
 

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Took my still relatively new 06 (7000 miles) in to dealer to have them find the leak in a tire. Figured I'd have them rotate tires while it was in there. First of all, they said they could not guarantee they could fix the leak if it was a bead leak, that I'd need to take it to a tire shop. And they said the rotation would cost $15. So I drove 1/2 mile to Les Schwab (where I'm not a customer). They fixed the flat and rotated my tires: no charge.

Why is it that any tire store will rotate your tires for life if you spend a few hundred bucks, while Toyota will not do it after you spend $30,000? Like I said, Schwab did not even sell me any tires. I sent my dealer a note just to release some steam. I'm sure it will spark a nationwide change of policy. Let me know when your dealer starts offering its customers free rotations.
 

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I have been curious about tire rotation as well. Dealer says they should do it because you have to reset the tire pressure sensors each time you rotate the tires. I looked in the book for my '06 DC, and sure enough, it says if you rotate the tires, you have to reset the system put pressing the button and waiting a bit.

This is not the first vehicle I have owned that has tire pressure monitoring, however, it's the first vehicle that the manuals says you need to do that.

None of you all have mentioned this in this thread, so is this something that is not actually required?
 

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I see nothing in the manual about the tps and rotating tires. What I do see is that you need to reset it if you change the tire pressure. As for rotating I bought a floor jack and use it along with jack stands to rotate my own tires. The manual on the 06 dc says to stay on the same side and swap the front and rear and that is what I do. If I get 30k out of these factory bridgestones I'll be lucky. I plan to replace them with pirelli scorpions or goodyear fortera triple treads when the time comes, probably next year. With a utqg rating of 300 they were never meant for a long life. When you buy tires you better pay attention to that rating.
 

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I see nothing in the manual about the tps and rotating tires. What I do see is that you need to reset it if you change the tire pressure.
On page 461 of my manual under the "Rotating Tires" section, it says:

"Initial adjustment of the tire pressure warning system is necessary after you have rotated your tires. See “Tire pressure warning system” in Section 1-7."

Page 208 is the start of section 1-7, which talks about the TPS, and on 212 it tells you the steps to reset it. On that page it also says you need to reset it after you rotate tires with the text "After replacing or rotating tires or wheels". So they seem pretty adamant about it being done if they mention it in several places.
 

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I have always used the "Modified X" rotation. The rear tires move straight to the front, and the front tires cross to the rear.
This is a good way to rotate. But you have to make sure that you don't have directional tread on your tires. If you have directional tread then you have to keep the tire on the same side of the vehicle. In that case only use the front to back rotation.
 

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I just did rotation #2 of my original equipment Bridgestones and I never reset the TPMS and I didn't have any issues with the light coming on.
 

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I'm curious about the cross rotation myself as I always heard not to swap tires so as to reverse the direction even in a non-directional tire as it can cause the vehicle to pull to one side or the other. I can't say from experience because I always have just rotated front to back.:confused:
 

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Don't forget the factory recommended pressures are different for front and back, so doing as the Manual says, it's not so much the relationship to wheel position, but the requisite change in pressure that would necessitate resetting the TPMS . . .

If you run the same pressure on all 4 tires, the TPMS wouldn't need a reset because it's not sophisticated enough to identify which tire is the "offender" when the light goes on (unless there's a way to read the identity code of each wheel's sensor). Now that'd be a useful feature for us ScanGauge owners.

On page 461 of my manual under the "Rotating Tires" section, it says:

"Initial adjustment of the tire pressure warning system is necessary after you have rotated your tires. See “Tire pressure warning system” in Section 1-7."

Page 208 is the start of section 1-7, which talks about the TPS, and on 212 it tells you the steps to reset it. On that page it also says you need to reset it after you rotate tires with the text "After replacing or rotating tires or wheels". So they seem pretty adamant about it being done if they mention it in several places.
 
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