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Hey folks. I've been driving my 2002 Tundra SR5 V8 4x4 for 17 trouble free years. It's still probably the nicest vehicle I've ever owned but I'm finally getting the itch for a new ride. Got my eye on the 2020 Tacoma TRD PRO. Talk me out of it! LOL Seriously, what do you think I will miss the most about the Tundra if I go to a new Taco. opinions and first hand experience welcomed.

Photo taken the day it followed me home. March 2003 w/4k miles. Looks about the same today with 130k miles.

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What will you miss ? The ride, the seats, the power, an attractive dash area rather than the 'block' format.

There's more things that a normal person can't fix on a newer truck. And you will no longer be driving a Classic truck !
 

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What will you miss ? The ride, the seats, the power, an attractive dash area rather than the 'block' format.

There's more things that a normal person can't fix on a newer truck. And you will no longer be driving a Classic truck !
Interesting thoughts. Oddly the wheelbase and curb weight of the old Tundra and new Tacoma are very similar. The Taco has a power fully adjustable drivers seat. My Tundra, not so much. A V6 Tacoma has 33 more HP and 50 LB-FT less torque. I'll agree on the dash.

As far as user repairability, I think that's a moot point. For 18 years my Tundra has only had one functional defect and that was an easily replaced o2 sensor. It has not been "in the shop" since I took possession of it. The fan speed knob broke and I've gone through two batteries. Damn thing still has all original brake shoes/pads @ 130,000 miles. I don't particularly care for newer cartridge oil filters as opposed to the spin ons of the older truck.

The Tundra wasn't a classic when I bought it either. If I compare similar equipment and adjust for inflation, the 2020 Tacoma costs almost exactly the same as my 2002 Tundra.
 

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Interesting thoughts. Oddly the wheelbase and curb weight of the old Tundra and new Tacoma are very similar. The Taco has a power fully adjustable drivers seat. My Tundra, not so much. A V6 Tacoma has 33 more HP and 50 LB-FT less torque. I'll agree on the dash.

As far as user repairability, I think that's a moot point. For 18 years my Tundra has only had one functional defect and that was an easily replaced o2 sensor. It has not been "in the shop" since I took possession of it. The fan speed knob broke and I've gone through two batteries. Damn thing still has all original brake shoes/pads @ 130,000 miles. I don't particularly care for newer cartridge oil filters as opposed to the spin ons of the older truck.

The Tundra wasn't a classic when I bought it either. If I compare similar equipment and adjust for inflation, the 2020 Tacoma costs almost exactly the same as my 2002 Tundra.
Keep the Tundra until it becomes problematic.

You lose the torque for a peppier ride, wider track width for stability and cab spaciousness. The electronics are simpler so there's less of a chance things will go wrong compared to more modern vehicles.

It's also easier to repair and just looks better, IMO.

I've had mine for 18 years and I need to get rid of it due to the rust after 230k miles. My power steering line gave out a couple weeks ago and I needed to route a bypass.

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Head room 7 hip room for both trucks are the same. 40" & 59". Front track is 2" wider on the Tundra. If you just compare numbers, old Tundra and new Tacoma are strikingly similar over all. I live in the rust belt so I don't expect my Tundra to last forever. I am going to replace it. I just don't know what with right now. The new Tundras are just too big for me (small garage). I used to drive Fords. They all retired themselves. : )
 

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A couple of weeks ago... I traded my 2018 Tacoma DCSB TRD Sport 4wd for a 2006 Tundra DoubleCab Limited 2wd. It only has 102k miles! Timing belt was changed.
Has a nice tonneau cover, a strong market sound system, and trailer brake controller.
It has a few dings that comes with being 14 years old but it's really sharp!

I had bought the 18 Tacoma new and while there are some features I liked, I really missed the extra room of the Tundra and that V8 engine. I'm 6'4" and even though the Taco specs claim more leg room, it's really misleading. Since the Tundra seat sits a little higher, it really more leg room.
Same with the power. Taco V6 might spec out at more HP, that Tundra V8 has more punch with less strain.
Gas mileage is roughly the same.

I had previously owned a 2003 Tundra access cab, step side 4.7 and drove it for 14 years, 250k miles. Was driving strong when I traded it to get my daughter a car.

It's good to be back!
 

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You're right, it wont last forever but keep in mind that living in the rust belt doesnt always mean a rusty vehicle. Do it yourself or take it somewhere but rustproofing works.
But as far as replacing or not, do what you want to do. You've had it for 17 years and if you feel like you want a new ride, get one, you've earned it.
 

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See if this guy can talk you out of it. He does a pretty nice side by side comparison. Of course, your needs and preferences may not be the same as his. Or mine. Or anybody else here.




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Sharp looking truck! They’re getting harder to find. I got mine almost 2 years ago to replace my beloved T100. It took me months of searching to find exactly what I wanted in good condition but I am so happy with it. I love the power of the newer 5.7/6speed combo but that is really about the only thing I like better about the newer Tundras. I’m really hoping that I can keep this truck for another 10-15 years like the last one.


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