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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I have done some searches and I just want to confirm my thought. I have a 07 5.7 DCab 4x4 shortbed, I'm looking at purchasing a travel trailer, dry 6,300lbs, tounge weight 915lbs. This is my concern. I am I correct in seeing that my truck only has a total capacity of about 1,390lbs, so that leaves only 475lbs for passangers, gas, cargo, etc, I'm 215 + girlfriend 115+ 4 bikes 100lbs, that's 430lbs and I don't even have gas in my truck yet? I'm thinking I need to find something in the hitch weigh of about 650lbs.

Any thoughts? I don't want to tear up my truck or add airbags, etc. When I bought my truck it came with a lifetime warranty on the powertrain, so I don't want to add anything that would give them an excuse to decline me down the road.

Tx
 

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Don't argue with an insomniac.
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1: Gas is calculated into carrying capacity.
2: Truck is under rated (like all trucks) but mine, same configuration, is rated at 1,530 lbs. payload.
3: You won't need air bags for this amount of weight.
4: Even with airbags, powertrain warranty won't be invalid unless they can somehow show that overloading caused the problem. Consider that this truck can tow a trailer with no brakes up to 3,000 lbs, or braked up to 10,000 lbs, a few hundred lbs over the payload rating is a non issue.
5: Better tires are a consideration, but that is true even if you don't haul much weight. The stock tires are pure crap.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response, how about the lenght of the trailer at 32ft? Of course I would have an Equalizer hitch.

Yeah, I burned thru the BFGoodrich in about 38,000 miles, I have Michelen LTX AT2 275/65/18 with about 20,000 miles on them now. These are the standard tires though, not E rated.
 

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Don't argue with an insomniac.
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Length does always count against you, and a weight distribution hitch helps to reduce sway. I tow a 34' trailer but it's a 5th wheel so not much help there but I did have a 28 foot trailer, just don't forget it's back there, practice, keep an eye on how it tracks behind you etc. etc.

Probably best advice re: towing is keep the speed down, 60MPH is a good maximum even if your truck has lots of power and will easily exceed that, any instabilities get accentuated with speed. Which you probably already know.

When towing with your standard tires, inflate to the max listed on sidewall, this will reduce your risk of premature tire failure. Your maximum payload is at max inflation.
 

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X2 What Frank says...
You're fine in those weights. Just practice with that length. I tow a 24 ft enclosed trailer plus hitch it adds up to about 28 ft behind the truck approx 9k when loaded. In the bed I add a small generator some other odds and ends, in the cab I add 4 medium to large teenagers (it's a tight fit but it's all an adventure for them). Watch out for tight corners and if you don't have tow mirrors get some extensions.

No air bags, stock P Metric tires 40PSI up front 44PSI in the rear and a draw tight WDH using 10,000 lb tension bars and a Reese friction sway control. The hitch will soon be upgraded to a Reese Dual CAM, and the tires will be upgraded to E Rated tires once the are ready to be replaced. I'm still on the fence about air bags; I've heard many negative comments about using WDH with air bags and I really don't have the cash to experiment. My only issues so far; Tires, you can feel the tires are very soft even at 44 pounds which adds to a kangaroo feeling going down the road sometimes and reduces lateral stability. My max speed is 55 MPH when towing (It's the law in Cali). On a recent trip to Arizona (75 MPH allowed for trailers) I thought the semis were gonna blow me of the road. I kept to the right lane and kept the speed down and made it through without any troubles.
 
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