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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I plan on a trip out to yellowstone np and other places pulling a 22' travel trailer @5800 lbs loaded.I will be going up and down some very large grades (some over 7 %).I am not too worried about the up grades but the down grades I'm concerned.
If I am in tow/haul and going downhill and step on the brakes will the trans shift and help slow the truck and trailer so that I still have brakes left when I get to the bottom of the grade.
I haven't driven in such mountainous roads before so I haven't experienced very long and steep down grades and don't know what to expect.
Do I leave it in tow/haul or take it out and put into shift and if so how low should I shift it down too.Common sense would tell me to do it gradually so I won't blow the trans.
Any guidence on this matter would be helpful.
Thank You,
Bob
 

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I put the transmission in S-mode when I approach a large downhill and shift into the gear that will hold the speed I want. On gradual or short downhills I just leave it in drive tow/haul and if you hit the brake it will downshift and hold that gear. On the steeper grades, I like to have the ability to downshift and upshift when I want depending on the grade and corners. The tundra transmission will impress you on the downhills and you will not have to worry about having burned up brakes at the bottom of a hill.
 

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With trailer brakes and Select-shift you will not have any problems. I tow a 33 foot trailer which weighs around 8000 lbs and I have had no problems going downhill or up. The Tundra is the best towing platform I have ever owned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
THANKS GUYS, I kinda of thought that the s position would be good but never had reason to use it. I will try it out on my next camping trip before we leave for the big one.This will give me some idea on how it is going to work
 

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as stated above, even w/o manually shifting it, if you press the brake and release when going down a grade like that the truck will downshift for you to slow down....
 

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Common sense would tell me to do it gradually so I won't blow the trans.
You can't blow the transmission easily. When you shift, you're actually "telling the computer to shift". It won't do it unless it figures it's "safe". Still, I wouldn't downshift too far too fast unless I had to.
 

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Ive made the trip to yellow stone several times, like other users have said just use the S mode you dont have to worry about blowing the trans on a down shift if your try to shift down and are going to fast the truck will not shift. Your trailer is well within the tow cap. of the truck so you got nothing to worry about, my trailers around 8K and ive done the trip 4times while towing. A trailer brake control is a must though!

Try not to ride the brakes too much let the transmission slow the truck down for the most part. You and the tundra will be fine. Have a great trip!
 

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I have towed my 28 foot, 6200 pound travel trailer from Arizona to Arkansas a couple of times. My '07 Tundra is the best tow vehicle I have ever owned and makes towing a breeze. Just a couple of things I will mention. The Cruise Control is almost unusable because it will up and down shift constantly and as a result will really give you poor gas mileage. I now just leave it off while towing and the truck runs in 5th most of the time. It will go into 6th on a level road with no wind, but any incline will cause it to downshift to 5th, then 4th. The best mileage I have gotten while towing is about 12.5. I use 10 mpg when calculating gas stops, just to be on the safe side. Using the CC I was down to about 8-9 mpg.

The Tundra will handle the hills like they aren't even there. I was able to pass traffic going uphill in Colorado...one a Dodge diesel towing a similar sized trailer on I-25 just north of Raton, NM. I just smiled and waved as we went by. I use "S" mode on really long downgrades, but usually I just leave it in "D" with the T/H turned on. That will automatically make it downshift for you. I have never had to ride the brakes going downhill and I have the original pads and rotors @ 65k miles.

Have a fun trip and enjoy the ride.......
 

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I now just leave it off while towing and the truck runs in 5th most of the time. It will go into 6th on a level road with no wind, but any incline will cause it to downshift to 5th, then 4th.
Just curious, does your truck ever shift to 3rd on longer/steeper hills w/ your camper when running highway speeds (60 to 65), or does 4th always do the job?
 

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I just got back from a trip with a lot of down hill grades and tapping the brakes when in tow/haul mode doesn't down shift down enough to hold you speed when going down a 6% grade, you need to shift down yourself to get to that point. My trailer loaded is about 6000#.
 

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Just curious, does your truck ever shift to 3rd on longer/steeper hills w/ your camper when running highway speeds (60 to 65), or does 4th always do the job?
It would go to 3rd on occasion if going up a long grade. I think most of the time it was 4th or 5th. I usually just watch the tach and try to keep it from going over 3000 rpm.

Talking about speeds...my Goodyear Marathon tires say that the max advisable speed is 65mph!

http://www.goodyear.com/rv/pdf/marathon_gen_info_032806.pdf
 

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I did Yellowstone last year with the same set-up and had ZERO problems. If you want a great view, go out the north entrance and over the Beartooth Pass! 10,990 ft elevation! Good luck and have a great trip!
 

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Talking about speeds...my Goodyear Marathon tires say that the max advisable speed is 65mph!

http://www.goodyear.com/rv/pdf/marathon_gen_info_032806.pdf
I think that's true of all ST tires. Personally, I try to adhere to that limit. A blown tire on a camper makes for a *very* bad day. If you're lucky, it won't shred the floor. The tires that came on our 09 camper aren't worth 2 cents. Our previous camper had Marathons, and they were great, so I replaced the originals with the same. At the time, they were "made in the US". Not sure about now, but I'll be replacing our "made in China" tires for some Marathons soon if they are US made. These Chinese tires have almost new tread, and are already showing signs of cracking and a slight "bubble" on one. Hard to believe...
 

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I'll be replacing our "made in China" tires for some Marathons soon if they are US made. These Chinese tires have almost new tread, and are already showing signs of cracking and a slight "bubble" on one. Hard to believe...
I bought my Goodyear Marathons last year. My original GYM tires lasted 7 years. Didn't notice until I got home that my new tires all are stamped "Made in China". Hope they last more than 2 years! They were made with cheap Chinese labor and the company no longer has to worry about medical and retirement benefits for its employees, but the damn tires still cost the same, or more, than when then were American made. They will be my last Goodyear tires.
 

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I bought my Goodyear Marathons last year. My original GYM tires lasted 7 years. Didn't notice until I got home that my new tires all are stamped "Made in China". Hope they last more than 2 years! They were made with cheap Chinese labor and the company no longer has to worry about medical and retirement benefits for its employees, but the damn tires still cost the same, or more, than when then were American made. They will be my last Goodyear tires.
Thanks for the info, but sad to hear. I had heard that Goodyear tried the "made in China", but the backlash forced them to move it back to the US. I haven't followed-up to confirm that (I read it recently on a forum... so it may be false). The bad thing is that every other trailer tire I've looked at is "made in China" too. I'll be doing more research before buying.
 

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Thanks for the info, but sad to hear. I had heard that Goodyear tried the "made in China", but the backlash forced them to move it back to the US. I haven't followed-up to confirm that (I read it recently on a forum... so it may be false). The bad thing is that every other trailer tire I've looked at is "made in China" too. I'll be doing more research before buying.

Holy crap!!!

I just bought +$2,000 worth of tires for the RV INSISTING on Goodyears........If they're made in China I'm not going to be too happy.
 

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definitely get yourself a trailer brake controller. You can get a few great Tekonsha models for at or under $100. You can install this yourself, and there are tons of threads here that will walk you through it. $100 is a wise investment against burning up your brakes, clutch, tires, or ending up in a raveen.

the technology on these brake controllers is really impressive, too. It knows whether or not you are going downhill or uphill, and adjusts your braking pressure to the trailer accordingly.
 
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