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Discussion Starter #1
I have read quite a few towing/hauling threads but could not find and posts that closely match what I am looking at doing, so I would appreciate your opinions.

How do you think my Tundra would do with a 775 lb motorcycle in the bed (tailgate down)and towing a 30ft trailer that is 7400lbs dry (i am guessing about 8500 lbs loaded with gear)? The weight on the hitch will be about 1050lbs. The Tundra has the tow package.

I am thinking that the Timbren Suspension Kit I have been looking at will be a given.

Will a weight distribution hitch be required? Is trailer sway going to be a problem?

One other thing to mention, I still have the stocker P275 65R18 BFG's...is it safe to assume those will need to go?

Thanks for any input!!
 

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Well, you will exceed your weight rating, so it won't be legal. That being said, you can probably do it. I would upgrade the tires to a higher load rating and consider air bags if the WDH doesn't level you out with the extra weight in the bed.
 

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For what its worth, I carried a HD Fatboy in the bed of a 2000 Tundra while hauling a 27', 6,500# travel trailer and it did fine. Just drive it accordingly knowing you are close to the limit.
 

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Over payload rating: Yes... but you won't break anything.
WD Hitch: Yes. Recommend Reese Dual Cam or Equalizer w/ 1200 lb bars.
Added spring or air bags: Yes. [If air bags, load truck (bike, etc.) and adjust air to put truck at unloaded height, then connect WD hitch and use it for all other adjustments.]
Power: You'll be fine.
Tires: Safer w/ LT tire, but what's the max psi on those P tires? If they'll take 44 psi, they will handle well and be safe at those loads.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
How much am I over the payload rating? Any additional input would be great. I might have to consider a toy hauler to be on the safe side...
 

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How much am I over the payload rating? Any additional input would be great. I might have to consider a toy hauler to be on the safe side...
Look at the available payload rating on your door jamb (I'm assuming Toyota stamps it there). Subtract your actual payload from that number.

Actual Payload = 1050 + 800 + you + fuel + anybody else + anything else.
 

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Don't do it. The ride will be unstable and you will be sued if you get in an accident with the vehicle overweight. I have towed a toy hauler just at legal weight with a Weight Dist hitch. It was no where near as stable as my duelly. The motor has the power, gas milage will be 10 to 12 MPG, but whenever a big rig went by, it moved you pretty good.
The Tundra is a towing SOB, but when you get near , at or above the limit, get a truck designed to take the weight.

John K
 

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I agree with Music on this.

If you're not over weight, you're pushing it. How often do you plan on towing with this configuration? Once in a while it's doable ADJUST YOUR DRIVING HABITS.

If you're towing this regularly, then yes, definitely upgrade the tires, you'll have to experiment with different configurations and fine tuning to get the load just right. Be careful with Air Bags on heavy loads and WDH, they can cause as many problems as they solve and they DO NOT increase your rating, they just help stabilize and keep you from bottoming out and last but not least ADJUST YOUR DRIVING HABITS!!

Owner's manual has all of the ratings and calculations for towing, read read read.

It's not just the ratings and capabilities of the rig. The largest factor in safe towing is the manner in which the rig is operated. Slow Down, plan ahead, give yourself plenty of time to make your destination. If you're tired rest, enjoy the drive.
 

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Did you see if the trailer will clear the gate being down and the bike up there?
X2 I wouldn't trust getting a hitch extension for that heavy a load. I would see about getting the bike on the trailer.
 

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I would listen to those guys. I have pulled/hauled well over all the tundras ratings. But difference is, All weight Ive pulled. Its Directly over the Axel.

My first thought, Pulling trailer, with tailgate down, bad Idea.
 

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If I were to jacknife my trailer with the tailgate down I would damage both the trailer and the truck, as they don't clear. A hitch extension won't allow proper use of a weight ditributing hitch, which you will need with all that weight.
 

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Those extensions are not free. They reduce the amount that you can tow. And since you are so close, it will push you overboard.
 

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I did this with a 2000 Tundra. Full size HD in the bed with the tailgate down. I used weight distribution hitch and sway control but didn't need a hitch extension. The front of the trailer would have touched if you jack knifed it but was fine for backing into camp site.
One word of advice, measure from the front of you bed to the edge of your tailgate with the gate down. Then cut a piece of 3/4 plywood to fit. I then screw two, 2X4's the length of the plywood in the center, just wide enough apart for your bike tires to go in-between. This has dual purposes. First off, the 2X4's act like a wheel chock and stop the tires from kicking out side to side. Second, it spreads the weigh of the bike so you don't end up with dents in the bottom of you bed and tailgate from the bike tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hey, I appreciate all the feedback! Based on what I read here I am going to scrap this idea and look at a toy hauler to simplify matters. Rep points to many!
 

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You don't need to use the inside of the trailer while you are traveling so just stick it in there over the axles
 
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