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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody have this problem on their 2wd 6 speed AT. Seems to happen when i'm trying to keep a constant speed between 20-50mph. I will lightly step on the gas while inbetween those speeds to maintain my speed. Usually happens after I lightly give some gas for a bit to gain a little more speed and then take my foot off the gas, I can get this "clunk" like the transmission is disingaging real roughly. It does happen at times when I lightly hit the gas between these speeds too. I guess I would say it's like it gets confused for a second and certain speeds what gear it should be in, or that it roughly re-ingages into gear. But not all the time.....

Anybody have this problem....or something similair. I have read some stuff about the 4WD getting having clunks and stuff, but apparently that is only for the 4wd. I don't notice anything drastic from a stop, like some others are saying as well. When it's cold it can shift a little rough, but that seems fairly normal.
 

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i have the same problem, but im in a 4x2. i think it might have something to do with the computer and the way it "learns" how you drive your truck. i broke my truck in driving it across the county pretty much, so i dont think my computer is "used to" slower, city-like driving. my truck came with a lifetime power train warranty, so i guess i dont mind.
 

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Hi , I have had this same problem for a year and a half !!
See my post's
I going back to the dealer on Nov. 17 maybe I'll know more then !
P.S. It is getting worse !!
 

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I have experienced the same thing many many times. Hasn't really concerned me. usually there is a slight incline involved as well.

I will subscribe to this thread just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I did some research, and looks like they are aware of it....there is a TSB out for it.....I'll copy and past below...Notice the First Paragraph...is that what you have?


A/T - Torque Converter Shudders
TC018-07
REVISED Title:
TORQUE CONVERTER SHUDDER Models:
'07 - '08 Tundra (6 Speed ATM) November 30, 2007
TSB REVISION NOTICE :
^ January 4, 2008: Production Change Information has been added. Previous versions of this TSB should be discarded. Introduction
Some customers may complain about an intermittent shudder when lightly accelerating after an upshift between 20 - 45 mph (32 - 72 km/h) or before a downshift between 30 - 65 mph (48 - 104 km/h) when the torque converter assembly is in flex lockup. Production changes to the torque converter have been implemented to improve this condition. Refer to the diagnostic instructions below to confirm if the torque converter needs to be replaced. Applicable Vehicles
^ 2007 - 2008 model year Tundra vehicles equipped with 6 speed automatic transmission (5.7 L V8 engine) and produced BEFORE the Production Change Effective VINs shown below.

Production Change Information

Warranty Information
Applicable Warranty*:
This repair is covered under the Toyota Powertrain Warranty. This warranty is in effect for 60 months or 60,000 miles, whichever occurs first, from the vehicle's in-service date. * Warranty application is limited to correction of a problem based upon a customer's specific complaint.

Parts Information

Required Tools & Equipment
Repair Procedure
1. Connect Techstream to the vehicle and perform Health Check. Confirm NO DTC(s) are stored in the ECM (SAE term: Powertrain Control Module/PCM). Are there any DTC(s) present in the ECM (PCM)?
^ If YES - This TSB does NOT apply. Refer to the Technical Information System (TIS) and diagnose DTC(s). ^ If NO - Go to Step 2. 2. Test drive the vehicle and confirm customer complaint of shudder. 3. Use Techstream to take a snapshot when shudder is occurring to confirm if shudder is occurring during flex lockup. Configure snapshot as follows:
30 Second Duration
Trigger Point at Midpoint NOTE :Refer to the University of Toyota online training class P901C "Techstream InDepth" for information about taking snapshots and graphing snapshots on Techstream.

4. Use Data List and the graphing functions of Snapshot to confirm the following data parameters when the shudder condition occurs: ^ Vehicle Speed ^ Shift Status ^ Lock Up ^ Lock Up Solenoid Status ^ SLU Solenoid Status ^ If the shudder occurs with Lock Up "ON", Lockup Solenoid Status "OFF", and SLU Solenoid Status "OFF", then the shudder is related to torque converter flex lockup. Go to step 5. ^ If the shudder occurs with Lock Up "OFF", Lock Up Solenoid Status "OFF", and SLU Solenoid Status "OFF", then the condition is NOT related to torque converter flex lockup and this TSB DOES NOT APPLY Continue diagnosis to identify the root cause for this shudder. 5. Replace the torque converter. Refer to TIS, 2007 or 2008 model year Tundra Repair Manual:
^ 2WD transmission: ^ Drivetrain - Automatic Transmission/Transaxle - "AB60EAutomatic Transmission: Automatic Transmission Assembly: Removal" ^ Drivetrain - Automatic Transmission/Transaxle - "AB60EAutomatic Transmission: Automatic Transmission Assembly: Installation" ^ 4WD transmission: ^ Drivetrain - Automatic Transmission/Transaxle - "AB60FAutomatic Transmission: Automatic Transmission Assembly: Removal" ^ Drivetrain - Automatic Transmission/Transaxle - "AB60FAutomatic Transmission: Automatic Transmission Assembly: Installation" 6. Adjust the transmission fluid level in the transmission. Refer to TSB No. TC009-07, "Transmission Fluid Level", to properly adjust the transmission fluid level.

NOTE :Failure to use WS transmission fluid and to properly adjust transmission fluid level can cause transmission shifting issues, M.I.L. "ON", and/or transmission damage. 7. Test drive the vehicle and confirm the shudder condition is eliminated.
 

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I too have this issue. Rolling / coasting up or down a slight incline with begining to apply to the accelerator pedal and then the transmission grabs a gear very hard. A clunk that you feel.

Been to the dealer numerous times and have it documented. No luck replicating and hesitant on getting a new TC -

Just1click keep us posted if you wouldn't mind!

Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Why are you hesitant on getting a new TC? When I think about it, I dont want them tearing up my underside, just have a bad feeling it won't be much better and the'll end up screwing something else up when doing it. But wondering if there was any perticular reason other than what I just mentioned you dont want to go that route. Do you know if this problem could cause long term damage, or could end up stranded somewhere??
 

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I have an 07 with 35K miles on it and have noticed this exact problem for many months. It is hard to duplicate on other roads but it almost always happens at a specific spot on a road near my home. I am cruising at about 40 mph on a level road, then I let my foot off the gas and start up a very slight incline, then when the speed drops to 30-35 mph I touch the gas lightly as the truck is headed up a second slight incline. As soon as I touch the gas I hear and feel a loud clunk which seems related to the transmission, as if something was hitting or shifting it really hard. When I cover this same approach with TOW/HAUL mode turned on then the problem does not occur which makes me suspect it is related to the hard up or down shift of the transmission.

I am nearing the end of my primary warranty so I took it to the dealer and I drove together with the master mechanic for 15 minutes near his shop but I could not duplicate it on those roads. Too many stop lights and traffic and not the right combination of speed and inclines. They checked the transmission fluid level and said it was ok, nothing to fix, so they are giving it back to me. I plan to pick it up tomorrow but will ask them to check out the TSB mentioned above just in case.

Has anyone actually had a dealer do this repair? Did it fix the issue? Is there any reason not to have it done?
 

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Crillman,

I noticed this same thing for a while now and figured I would call my "servicing dealer" I explained everything and they are going to replace my TC on Monday. Last time I really noticed it was after I towed a 7000# boat. I will let you know if that was the cure.
 

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That happened to me the other day on the highway. Going about 70 when I tried to pass a slower vehicle. Little more aggressive on the accelerator and felt that clunk. Thought I tore something up.
 

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Mine does it sometimes just like you guys describe, almost always right between 32-38 MPH on a hill. I may take it in at 59,900 miles :crazy: I don't have any extended warranty.

I'm nervous about letting them get ahold of the tranny and TC.
 

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My dealer told me they didn't find any problem with my transmission. I specifically mentioned this TSB and asked them to double-check to see if the torque converter shudder might be the cause. They told me that if the TC was bad as described in the TSB then it would shudder a lot more often, almost all of the time, rather than under specific conditions relative to the slope of the road. So they refused to do any TC work and gave it back to me as-is. I am satisfied for now since I at least have the complaint on record but I still wonder if my problem is related to the TC or something else.

They did replace my driveshaft per the older TSB which was causing the truck to surge forward with a slight bump with when stopping. Maybe the new driveshaft will make everything OK but somehow I think I will be back in the shop later on down the road for the hard shift issue. I just couldn't duplicate it on the roads near the dealership so I didn't have any ammo to push them harder.
 

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HI :
Update on my transmission ; had it at the dealer Nov. 17 for reg. maintance ect.
and also "The Clunck" problem !
It started doing this about 5000-6000 miles ! At first I though I was hitting small pot holes ,
but realized that it was the transmission ; took it to the dealer several times for this but
could not dulplicte when at dealer [4 times now] .
Dealer told me that they have documents on my truck here and with
toyota corporate !
I Also now at 20,000 miles have the TQ. shudders at same speeds as the transmission cluncks !
Dealer told me not to worry ; it has been documented and I will have 100,000 warrenty on these issues , mean while just drive the truck !!
P.S. The shifting issues only happen when the truck is in 6th. gear and it abrutly shifts into
4th. , it will not happen under Heavy Acceleration , Tow/Hall , 5th-4th , 4th -5th ect.
Dealer said they cannot fix something unless they can duplicate it !!
The least we can do is is make as many dealers aware of this until we get a TSB !!!
Raise HE!!
 

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Hey guys - new to the forum, new Tundra owner as well (2015 Crewmax 5.7 Ltd, stock) I've spent several hours searching this forum and others for a clue to my (presumably) transmission clunk mystery. This thread seems to be the closest in terms of symptoms, but it's super old and there isn't much closure.

When I'm driving at a constant speed always in the 40-55 MPH range and the truck is in a high gear, 1200-1400 RPM, if the road is slightly inclined I often feel a very noticeable clunk. Like going over a small pothole. It will sometimes do it just once, other times a few in a row spaced out by a couple seconds - not a shutter though. The RPMs don't change, so it isn't a hard shift, and if the truck downshifts to higher RPMs it won't do it any more. Similarly, it won't do it at freeway speeds. I've put about 2000 miles on the truck since purchasing it and the issues hasn't gotten worse. Took it to an independent Toyota shop, they said no relevant codes, flashed the latest SW version, and they saw nothing suspect when it was up on the lift. Otherwise the truck drives perfectly fine.

Not sure if it's poor form to dig up an old thread, but just hoping anyone here may have found some answers in the past few years. Wondering if maybe a transmission flush could do the trick, or maybe just accept that it's a truck and will drive like one?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Hey guys - new to the forum, new Tundra owner as well (2015 Crewmax 5.7 Ltd, stock) I've spent several hours searching this forum and others for a clue to my (presumably) transmission clunk mystery. This thread seems to be the closest in terms of symptoms, but it's super old and there isn't much closure.

When I'm driving at a constant speed always in the 40-55 MPH range and the truck is in a high gear, 1200-1400 RPM, if the road is slightly inclined I often feel a very noticeable clunk. Like going over a small pothole. It will sometimes do it just once, other times a few in a row spaced out by a couple seconds - not a shutter though. The RPMs don't change, so it isn't a hard shift, and if the truck downshifts to higher RPMs it won't do it any more. Similarly, it won't do it at freeway speeds. I've put about 2000 miles on the truck since purchasing it and the issues hasn't gotten worse. Took it to an independent Toyota shop, they said no relevant codes, flashed the latest SW version, and they saw nothing suspect when it was up on the lift. Otherwise the truck drives perfectly fine.

Not sure if it's poor form to dig up an old thread, but just hoping anyone here may have found some answers in the past few years. Wondering if maybe a transmission flush could do the trick, or maybe just accept that it's a truck and will drive like one?

Thanks in advance!
Did you ever find a solution? I am experiencing the same issues.
 

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I experienced this torque converter issue a few times about 3 years ago, so I changed my driving habits.

I drive in S-4 all the time occasionally shifting manually into S-5 and sometimes S-6 as needed, but I always come of the line in S-4, and I have not experienced the clunk, bump, or shudder since I changed the way I drive the truck. Yes it revs a little higher, but that's not a bad thing and it's not damaging anything.
 

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Two pence…
So there’s a LOT of potential problems/nuances that can cause this type of condition. I’d be willing to bet that most of these issues are one in the same but sadly when there’s an answer for one, it doesn’t fit all. Basically every powertrain and drivetrain fault can generate a hard shift/shock/or clunk. You’ll have to establish a solid baseline for every single vehicle you encounter. For example, starting and charging circuits, if your battery is deficient or your alternator doesn’t keep up with loads you can experience shift problems. If you have a check engine light that you’ve driven on for the last two years, it could cause the problem. Anything that loads the vehicle during a shift, like the a/c compressor can cause the problem. Does that mean that those are the solutions? Absolutely not. But if they’re defective it will convey in a shift. Toyota does not specify a service interval for the WS transmission fluid. It’s considered a lifetime synthetic. And well… yes, it causes problems. Since trans fluid is hydraulic, as it breaks down it can’t do its job and you might as well run water through the valve body. The fluid loses its ability to protect parts, becomes saturated in debris(micro-particles) and just like the oil you fry your Christmas turkey or Saturday night footballs French fries(freedom fries… duh) it gets old and needs to be thrown out. Catch 22. New fluid can cause slippage if you’ve waited 250,000 miles to change it, or the act of draining the fluid and exposing clutches to air may. I haven’t seen it happen in quite a long time but it can and does happen. Everything is built with planned obsolescence in mind. Most vehicles are designed to last around 150,000 miles before they need a major repair( engine or transmission). Now, what’s all this mean…. There are a number of ways to isolate a crafty, nasty, dare I say… evil shift condition. Sell the truck, sell it now…. Hahahaha. Just kidding, unless I can get it for about $50. Then it’s definitely a death trap. Moving on, if you drive a 4wd vehicle you can remove the rear driveshaft and lock the front differential in. If it doesn’t clunk/shock then it’s between the transfer case output shaft and the rear wheels. Yes, Toyota has a couple TSB’s related. One says to do the previous test. But what if it’s 2wd…. You’re screwed…. Nope, being a bad technician again. It may be more difficult to isolate 2wd though. A driveshaft defect will usually surface as a clunk during engagement, as in a downshift at a stop or during a downshift from torque converter lockup when the shaft is not driving as much load. But what part of the driveshaft you say? Checking for play in the u joints should be a given but the devils in the details. If you have a center hanger bearing on a two piece shaft, with play, that can cause both conditions of shock(coming to a stop or downshift from lock up). If you have brake drag from the rear, guess what? Stupid condition can manifest again. I’ve spent nearly a quarter century learning to isolate these ghosts and I still get stumped. Very very frustrating. I stumbled upon this forum in a google search for this ghost. Sadly, the cost and time didn’t allow me to finalize a repair that fixed the concern today but these considerations may help you with yours. I pulled the driveshaft on my target, it seemed to minimize the effect, considering how many times I’ve seen fluid cause an issue I was hesitant to pull the trigger on a new driveshaft, as they are quite pricey. I even repacked (very carefully) the slip yoke with grease to help absorb the shock and to allow a “tighter” fit of a part commonly over looked and clearing the vent hole of obstructed grease, didn’t quite cut the mustard. I advised a transmission fluid change to cover the corners and that’s where the bottom fell out. Having already done repairs for state inspection guidelines and paid to pull the driveshaft, the customer wasn’t prepared for the depth of chase. WS is expensive stuff by the way. Many of these things can be done from home and documented to help narrow down problems. The downside is, as a technician you can’t accept that everything was done to a T and sometimes you have to back track over what someone else has done to confirm(beyond any shadow of a doubt) that a part is good. I saw a few posts of folks concerned with getting a torque converter replaced because there may be other damage done. While it is possible, it is very rare at the dealership setting(all reputable businesses will stand behind the work). I wouldn’t fear damage from a factory trained technician. They don’t give transmission jobs to the oil techs. On another note. Having worked for Toyota, I can tell you beyond any doubt and slap a guarantee on it to boot, when a technician hits the button on the factory scan tool and begins their diagnostics, a copy is sent to Toyota of the trouble codes, freeze frame data, date, time, what you had for breakfast, etc and the engineers can pull that information to help isolate a condition. Even if the technician cleared the codes and data before recording it. GUARANTEED. If you have any doubts about a diagnosis you can call Toyota’s customer service line and they will back their product 100%. I’ve seen it multiple times. I’ve seen a non-English speaking Japanese man show up, to plug a computer that I’ve never seen in my life, into a vehicle to isolate a problem that was occurring. Toyota is one manufacturer that does not short change the customer. Dealerships on the other hand, can sometimes push a customer off when they’re under pressure and can’t get work completed(doesn’t happen often but it can). So, finally, what if there are no codes? There usually isn’t for a shock type shift. The computer control system looks for changes in resistance and open or shorted circuits. When none are found, the computer outputs no codes. That’s when a technician has to work from problem symptom tables and experience. Bear in mind, we are human and do make mistakes, and often you’ll find that a tech will spend hours isolating a problem and may not even get paid for a warranty condition that can’t be isolated(I spent about 4 hours in the chase to get paid 1.7 for diag and pulling the driveshaft). It’s the nature of the beast. Just realized that another impact is driveline angle! If you’ve lifted the truck or it has sagged much, you’ll find nuances in shifting. Usually in the form of vibration but sometimes during a shift depending on wear of driveline. So in conclusion, it’s not a cut and dry, plug up a scan tool and get answers situation. It can take hours or days of constant work and a small fortune to narrow down what the root cause is. I’ve only given a few potential sources, there’s probably a hundred more. Be sure to do routine maintenance and catch up things long overdue then you can establish a baseline and if all else fails, go to the junk yard and pick up some cheap parts to try and see if they change the dynamics in any way. Hope my pence help in some fashion. Pennies don’t go far these days… Can’t say that my post does either but this should give you both some ideas and some perspective on what has to be done to isolate a ghost. See ya around!
 

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It dawned on me that I didn’t touch on torque converter shudder…. Dang it… was about to eat some chips and drink a, er, soda… torque converter shudder usually manifests as a rumble like hitting the strips on the side of the interstate(don’t say you’ve never done it…). It’s a buzz vibration that usually doesn’t stick around long. I can’t remember when I saw a Toyota do it so they may buzz, rumble, cha cha, or shock briefly. All that aside there’s 3 main sources for that, the pressure solenoid(not common), the torque converter (fairly common), and the fluid(tends to be very common across all manufacturers). If it’s suspect, might as well change it. Modern vehicles usually have a drain plug but it’s best to drop a pan to check for debris on the magnets and (for the tundra) condition of the filter/screen. If there’s a lot of debris you may need a transmission as well as a cooler/radiator(depends on equipment). With the technology as advanced as it is, there shouldn’t be any problem having a technician take a few pictures of the magnets and condition of the fluid so you can see what it looked like. Maybe even hang it on the wall(back in 2021 ol Betsy got a fluid change and you wouldn’t believe the metal on the magnets, until we got this picture)… Well, that’s about it for me, I’ve had enough “fun” for one night. Adios.
 
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