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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 02 tundra 2wd V8 at. I am swapping transmissions with an 04 that I bought with 9,000 miles on it. I Would like to know what all is involved with removing the old transmission and installing a new transmission.. I need specifics. I am going to attempt to do this myself
 

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I would buy a Haynes or Chilton manual. The Haynes manual
gives step by step instructions on what to do. I assume the Chilton's does
also. Good luck.

John
 

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It is straight forward. I recommend another set of hands or a tranny jack. All you have to do is disconnect the exhaust from the manifold on the drivers side and disconnect after the cat to remove that pipe. Disconnect the passenger side after exhaust after the cat, so the motor can angle down. I also recommend an air compressor, it will make the job easier with power tools.

Attached below is everything you need to know! Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I didnt think it was necessary to remove the exhaust from what I've heard. It also looks like the exhaust is pretty much out of the way. I noticed that your attachment is for a A750E and F. The one I'm using is a A340E i thought... I may be wrong though.
 

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You might be able to squeeze it out without removing the exhaust. But other than that, disconnect drive shaft, unplug all connectors from tranny, remove torque converter bolts, remove tranny crossmember, disconnect shifter linkage, and remove the bell housing bolts and drop it down. You will probably want to drain the fluid first. Oh and if you have a factory or aftermarket tranny cooler, don't forget to disconnect the lines for that too.

That's all there really is to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You might be able to squeeze it out without removing the exhaust. But other than that, disconnect drive shaft, unplug all connectors from tranny, remove torque converter bolts, remove tranny crossmember, disconnect shifter linkage, and remove the bell housing bolts and drop it down. You will probably want to drain the fluid first. Oh and if you have a factory or aftermarket tranny cooler, don't forget to disconnect the lines for that too.

That's all there really is to it.

I've never handled a torque converter before. Does it just unbolt and slide out or is there a specific way to get it lined up. How do you drain the fluid from the torque converter? Does it come out when you drain the pan? What about flushing the lines? I've heard you can flush the lines with cheap stuff before you refill it.. In that manual it was saying to remove the starter. Is that necessary?
 

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I've never handled a torque converter before. Does it just unbolt and slide out or is there a specific way to get it lined up. How do you drain the fluid from the torque converter? Does it come out when you drain the pan? What about flushing the lines? I've heard you can flush the lines with cheap stuff before you refill it.. In that manual it was saying to remove the starter. Is that necessary?
Draining the fluid from the pan does not drain fluid out of the torque converter. You will unbolt the torque converter bolts (I can't recall how many there are, maybe 8?) from the little window at the front of the tranny under the motor (There will be a cover plate with a 14mm bolt you have to remove to do so). But once you do that and remove the bell housing bolts, all you have to do is drop the tranny with the converter in it, you will not be able to remove the converter until the tranny is out. But are you re-using your old converter? If not then don't worry about it after you take out the old tranny.

With flushing the lines, I just like to blow them out with compressed air into a bucket. Now you may want to run some cheap fluid through it if you got water in the fluid or something but if not, then just use air.

And no, you do not need to remove the starter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Draining the fluid from the pan does not drain fluid out of the torque converter. You will unbolt the torque converter bolts (I can't recall how many there are, maybe 8?) from the little window at the front of the tranny under the motor (There will be a cover plate with a 14mm bolt you have to remove to do so). But once you do that and remove the bell housing bolts, all you have to do is drop the tranny with the converter in it, you will not be able to remove the converter until the tranny is out. But are you re-using your old converter? If not then don't worry about it after you take out the old tranny.

With flushing the lines, I just like to blow them out with compressed air into a bucket. Now you may want to run some cheap fluid through it if you got water in the fluid or something but if not, then just use air.

And no, you do not need to remove the starter.
Ok thanks for the tip. I am not reusing the torque converter the tranny i bought has one already in it. So i guess I just stick it up there and make sure the bolts are lined up? Does it matter what order? When I refill the tranmission will it fill up the converter as well or just the pan?
 

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Ok thanks for the tip. I am not reusing the torque converter the tranny i bought has one already in it. So i guess I just stick it up there and make sure the bolts are lined up? Does it matter what order? When I refill the tranmission will it fill up the converter as well or just the pan?
If your new tranny's converter doesn't have any fluid in it, I would pour some in it at first. I don't know how much though, that thing holds a lot of fluid, probably put int 2 quarts or so then put it back on the input shaft, spinning it to make sure it seats all the way on. You may think its all the way on but spin it and push and it will probably go on further. What I did was get the tranny lined up with the motor, throw in a bell housing bold on each side, then put line up the converter with the flywheel and put one bolt in there. Then you will want to put in and tighten all bell housing bolts first, then finish installing the converter bolts.
 

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How long does it take to swap it out.. with two people working on it? Just a reasonable estimate...
I could probably do it in about 2 hours with help. But I have done it may times before. For a first time I would say a full day.
 

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Buy two long 2' socket extensions, and a wobble-head socket sized to the bellhousing bolts. It makes removal and installation much easier whether you're using an air ratchet or hand tools.

Never, ever use the bellhousing bolts to pull the trans onto the engine...the trans housing is aluminum and you will break it. If it won't push flat against the engine by hand, it's not aligned right.

Do what the other guy said regarding the torque converter. Pour fluid into it until it's full, then slide it onto the trans input shaft while gently rotating. Keep pushing in and rotating to ensure it is fully seated...it's possible to mount the trans w/ the converter not engaged to the pump, and you'll destroy your new trans.

Get a flywheel turner tool, only costs $15 or so at NAPA and you'll be glad you have it when removing and installing the torque converter bolts.

Use an accurate torque wrench when installing the bellhousing bolts and torque converter bolts. I like Loctite thread locker (blue for bellhousing, red for converter).

Find the torque specs for the bellhousing and converter bolts. They're in the Haynes/Chilton manuals. Mine's in the garage and it's freezing out there. Probably posted here somewhere.

Brake parts cleaner is great for cleaning bolt threads, grab a can while you're picking up the extensions/socket/Loctite/etc.
 

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Instead of being a flywheel turning tool, I just turned the motor/trans over with the crank bolt at the front of the motor. If you already have that size wrench then just use it. Saves you $15.
 

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I wasn't on planning on removing the exhaust, but had too otherwise you could not slide the transmission out without hitting the under body. The reason of removing the exhaust is to have the motor tilt back to have more room to slide the transmission out. With power tools and extensions will make the job easier!

BTW: I thought the 2001-2002 are only compatible and an 2003-2004 are different? When I was searching for my 2001 I was told by many wrecking yards and using the search function on this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Nope the only difference is you have to swap the tailshaft housing. There have been many people on this forum that have done it and said everything lines up. You have to swap the tailshaft housing for the purpose of using cruise control, and speedo sensor. The main reason I got it was because 03-04 tranny has upgraded overdrive gear..which is what failed in mine and most people with 00-02 tundras.
 

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Wish I knew that 3 months ago! I do have a used transmission out of a wrecked tundra. The place I purchased it from lied about the miles, so they gave me a 1 year warranty. If it goes next time, I will replace it with an 04 trans! Let us know how the install went. Its really not bad. Much easier than my mustang and my mustang was easy. Everything is accessible on the Tundra!
 
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