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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
What would be the max dry weight you would go with this car.

we are parents with 4 children. We own sequoia platinum 2019 and need to match travel trailer.
Thank you for advice.
 

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The tow ratings are far under this vehicle's limits. However, stay within the legal numbers. PAY MOST attention to your payload. It is very easy to exceed it with tongue weight and cargo. We tow a 31' Airstream with our 2010 (which is rated at 9,100lbs before they were reduced in 2011). It tows beautifully.

By allllll means, invest in a good hitch. We have a Hensley. Propride is its cousin. They are the best names in towing and it is SO worth the drama-free experience. I'd stick with a dry weight of about 5,500lbs max.
 

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Besides trailer weight, consider altitudes (is air thin), road grades, ambient temps in the overall equation, I'd consider an auxillary trans cooler depending.....plus extra items typically add 1k to 1500 more #s....Luck and Enjoy those Toyotas.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
According to your experience would you pull this trailer with sequoia.
The biggest winner for us are those 4 bunk beds. We can’t find shorter trailer that has 4 bunk beds. We would be fine with Murphy bed for us. Can’t see combination like this, so this trailer caught our attention. Of course how that would it go with bellow measurement. I’ll be appreciate for all comments, the only experience we have is pop up trailer that we have it when owned Toyota Sienna and worked good for us.

KEY SPECIFICATIONS - 292BH SL SERIES TRAVEL TRAILER
Shipping Weight5743
Carrying Capacity1457
Hitch755
Length32' 4"
Height10' 8"
 

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It gets more complicated, as there are several limits besides tow weight you must be aware of. Unfortunately, until you make your purchase, load it up and go to the scales, you won’t know for sure how close you are to them.

For my 2012 Sequoia, the key weights, as listed on the door tag and sales brochures, are as follows (I imagine 2019 Sequoia is similar):
  • Gross Vehicular Weight Rating (GVWR) 7,300: maximum operating weight/mass of a vehicle as specified by the manufacturer including the vehicle's chassis, body, engine, engine fluids, fuel, accessories, driver, passengers and cargo but excluding that of any trailers.
  • Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR Front) 4,000: is the maximum distributed weight that may be supported by the front axle.
  • Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR Rear) 4,280: is the maximum distributed weight that may be supported by the rear axle.
  • Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) 14,000: is the maximum allowable combined mass of the vehicle, the passengers and cargo in the tow vehicle, plus the mass of the trailer and cargo in the trailer.
  • Curb Weight 5,985: from sales brochure
  • Payload 1,315: GVWR less curb weight
  • Towing Capacity 7,300: from sales brochure
  • Maximum Tongue Weight 910: from sales brochure
According to the specifications you provided, the trailer GVWR is 7200 lbs, which is close to the maximum towing capacity of a Sequoia and will impact how much you can carry in the vehicle.

With two adults and four kids, you potentially have a lot of stuff. With that many people, you don't have a lot of room inside the Sequoia to carry stuff. Do you plan on putting the stuff in the trailer (increasing the tow weight) or possibly on top of the vehicle (increasing the payload). No matter where you put the stuff, you are still constrained by the GCWR.

The trailer specifications you included does not indicate what is included in the Shipping weight. Does it include the weight of full propane tanks? If not, your carry capacity will be reduced by the added weight of propane. The weight of your weight distribution hitch will have an impact. Hauling water and gray/black tank waste (8 lb per gallon) will also eat into your carrying capacity. Are your kids preschool or teens? Is your hobby collecting anvils? So many unknowns.

That said and after all I wrote above, I would say, go with the trailer you identified and watch what you carry. Scales at truck stops are your best friend for optimizing your weight.

Hope this helps,


Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thank you so much it helps a lot. I know this trailer is close to the limit. We searched for smaller trailers but non of them have solution with quad bunk beds. We are not planning to carry water, just other stuff, not a lot of clothes, it works for us, we do laundry when necessary. We choose sequoia as a family vehicle and love it. Now, we have to match trailer. Thank you again.
 

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Greg nailed it with his response. There are bunkhouse trailers that are smaller than what you listed. I have seen them at about 27' and 5,000lbs. You're cutting it close. Save a few bucks for a Hensley or ProPride hitch!
 

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We have a 2008 Sequoia LTD 4wd with air suspension. For years I was also on the "pay attention most to payload" train as most important. I too have a travel trailer, GVW is 6600lbs (we've just bought, still waiting to pick it up). With the added tongue weight, and the weight of our passengers (have kids, and friends) and lots of gear - we are often quite a bit over our max payload rating.

However, the more I thought about it, and the more vehicles I saw that posted their payloads in the "max tire load" information stickers (think about WHY they post it right there) the more I agree with Greg and his comments above for the most part - however I would take it a bit further.... The reason being is the sequoias ship with quite light duty tires. (passenger C rated if I recall)... My previous tires only had a 45 or 50lb max psi rating from memory (we have upgraded). When you're loaded with family and gear and have the weight of a trailer tongue it can push the limits of the tires - especially in hot summer travel on long trips etc...

I think the GVW, Axle weights, but MOSTLY the GCVW (combined max weight of trailer/vehicle/cargo) is key. Especially as you upgrade to better tires (D or E rated). We also upgraded the fronts to coilovers (bilstein) and new rear bilstein shocks as well. Gives about a 1.5" lift too, and the air suspension just matches the front ride height to look square.

Vehicle drives much more planted under load, handles the bumps WAY better than before.

  • Use a GOOD quality EQ hitch with anti-sway
  • Upgrade your tires to D or E rated (8/10 ply)
  • Optional: upgrade front springs to heavier (this really helped reduce bounce and smooth things out especially when you are loaded with passengers and heavy tongue weight of a trailer).
  • Pay MOST attention to your axle weight ratings and GCVW, even more so than your GVW and payload ratings - as the latter two are based MUCH on the manufacturer's tires max rating from what I can tell.
With our new trailer (once I pick it up) I will find out how it handles with passengers. If it's a bit too soft, I may rip out the air suspension all-together and go with thicker springs/firestone airbags etc to help keep things proper - but that might be overkill - we'll see.

Happy towing!!
 

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One other thing... Check out Andersen Weight Distributing Hitches - it's what we have and they're quite a bit lighter than most standard EQ hitches, plus they provide full sway control too. Compact package, and no load bars to tighten (but you do have to tighten the chains). Rated up to 14,000lbs and it works great with our travel trailer.
 
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