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I recently got a Check Engine light with a code P0051 which an internet search described as a Bank 2 (passenger side), sensor #1 (exhaust manifold) oxygen sensor failure. P0031 would have been the driver side.
I ordered a new Denso sensor from an internet site for about $115 plus shipping, plus a short 22mm sensor socket, and bought a can of PB blaster from a local parts store.
I put the front wheels on ramps, crawled underneath and ran into a show stopper: I couldn't disconnect the electric connector because it seemed to require 2 hands in a place where there was barely room for one. A question on this forum gave me the answer. Here is the replacement procedure:

1: Get a replacement Denso sensor (they make the OEM part), a 22mm sensor socket (the low profile one works best), PB blaster.
2: Put the front wheels on ramps, blocks. Put truck in park, set the hand brake, use jack stands if you're not using a ramp.
3: From underneath the truck, locate the sensor at the back of the exhaust manifold, spray liberally with PB Blaster, and follow the wires to the electric connector on the engine block.
4: Usually, you press on the release tab on the back of the female socket (the part fastened to the engine block) and pull the male connector out with the other hand. There is not room for two hands and the release tab is too difficult to reach. The solution is use a medium to small screw driver, place it inside the connection so that it raises the release tab. The tension should hold it in place while you grab the wires below the connection and pull gently. The connection should come apart. If not, try a slightly thicker screw driver to lift the tab more and wiggle the wires back and forth as you pull. It really doesn't take a lot of effort.
5: If you don't have a code reader to clear the code with, disconnect the negative battery terminal so the ECU will reset and clear the code.
6: After the PB Blaster has soaked in for about an hour, start the engine and let it run for a minute to warm the manifold and sensor.
7: Use the sensor socket (slotted for the wires to fit through) to remove the old sensor. Be careful when it comes out as it will be hot.
8: The new sensor should have come with anti-seize (if not, get some). Spread liberally on the threads, hand thread into the manifold, use the sensor socket to snug it down, and reconnect to the female socket. Tug gently to ensure connector has snapped into place.
9: Use a code reader to clear the code and take it for a test drive.
 

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Thanks for that. I need to do this for the driver's side (bank 1 sensor 1).

I tried earlier today, but what a PITA!!!

There is absolutely no room to get two hands in there, but from what I've read it seems that is the norm.

Unfortunately, I can't get a decent shot at the socket with the PB plaster since it's partially blocked by the manifold coupling.

I'll try again tomorrow. Maybe I'll invest in a pair of ramps.
 

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2001 Tundra O2 Sensor #1 Bank 1 Replacement / Noob...

I just used a friends code reader... I got the P0135 bank 1 sensor 1 o2 sensor heater circuit malfunction. I have never tried repairing it myself... seems like a lot of trouble. But, I just replaced an o2 sensor... guessing it was the rear one?
I went years without this crap... now they fail all the time... :mad:
I had a dealer strip the threads on my headers years ago while replacing an o2 sensor... just a little frighten about trying it myself now... hehe

Any chance I can do this? I don't have blocks. Was going to go to auto-zone and rent the tool. Would hate to take it apart and not be able to put it back together... :ballchain:

If anyone could suggest where I could get a good price on the part and maybe a diagram of the location of o2 on my 2001 tundra v-8... would be greatly appreciated... I blew $300 at the dealer last time/ that hurt! :eek:
I was in and out in 20mins. though; guess that's the least they can do for screwing us. :ts:

PS) i made note of the PB Blaster spray and anti seize needed... not familiar with that though.
 

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thanks for putting this up there - I am off to try using a small flathead screwdriver to get this outta the wiring harness thingy

later
 

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I believe bank 1 sensor 1 is the driver's side front sensor. The front sensors are the one's that seem to go out the most. Ramps are not necessary but it is a pain to do. When removing the sensor, the threads seem to gall a lot with carbon. Just work the sensor in and out while spraying with WD40 or PBBlaster. Be careful because when laying under the truck your head is directly below where you will be working. Wear your goggles for this one. I rented the AutoZone tool and it worked very well. Rock Auto had the best price on the sensor when I was looking.
 

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This and other forums have been incredibly helpful. I just finished replacing both front sensors and have only this to add to all the great advice:
To unclip the electrical connectors I found the screw driver trick too hard, and by hand it went easy - but you have to be on your back with your feet facing forward to be in position for this. For the passenger side clip, you press on the release tab with your index finger while flexing your pinky against the wires... it puts enough tension on the cable to pull the connector out. Curse and wail as needed.
To loosen the sensors themselves I could not get leverage from the same position - you have to be on your back with your feet facing back for this to work. Curse and wail as needed, as always.

Carma Sutra!
 

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I'm getting ready to do this on my 03 Tundra. I also have the P0051 error code (passenger side, exhaust manifold). I went to the Denso web site to check on the part and it appears that 2WD Tundras have two oxygen sensors (one front, one rear) and 4WD Tundras have four oxygen sensors (two front, two rear). Am I understanding this correctly? I have not got under the truck yet. I called the local Toyota dealer but the parts guy could not say for sure. This is where I am looking:

DENSO Aftermarket: Catalog Search From DENSO: Quality Aftermarket Automotive Parts

Thanks.
 

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Thanks to everyone that posted about how to fix an P0051 error code for the front passenger side oxygen sensor. Thanks to everyone else, my experience went very well today. I would like to add the following.

First, as others have said in this post and others, getting a special socket for this job is a must. I found one at Harbor Freight dirt cheap but ended up going with this OEM 27110 set on Amazon instead for $17.24. I did not know if I would need more than just the socket but I wanted to be prepared for anything. As it turns out, I only used the socket.

Amazon.com: OEM 27110 Oxygen Sensor Socket: Automotive

Also, I bought an Equus 3030 engine code reader for $59.99. This was optional since in most states Advanced Auto will read your code for free but I figured with all the money I was saving by not having this problem fixed at the dealership, I could splurge and buy another tool. I love tools. Before I started the project, I used this to confirm that I only had one bad sensor. It had been awhile since I had Advanced Auto read my code so I wondered if a second one had gone bad. So far, only the front passenger side ox sensor has gone bad. From what I read on the Internet, most of these low priced engine code readers have the same features. I picked this one because the display was bigger than the alternatives.

Amazon.com: OEM 27110 Oxygen Sensor Socket: Automotive

Lastly, I bought the new oxygen sensor. I called the dealership and they wanted around $157 if I remember correctly. Next, I checked Rock Auto. I found an exact replacement Denso (OEM not universal fit) for $62.01 after my discount including shipping. I discovered on Coupon codes and discounts for 30,000 online stores! RetailMeNot.com, a promo code that I used for an additional discount in order to get the price that low.

Finally, it was time to actually get under the truck. After 94,000 miles and numerous Michigan winters on my '03, I was expecting a long day. Thankfully, I was wrong. I tried to take plenty of pictures as I went to help out the next person to read this thread. Here's an overview of the sensor. I found it was often easiest to get to it with my body parallel to the body of the truck with my feet under the front bumper.



Below is a closeup of the threaded portion of the sensor. Most of my time was spent removing this. The rust had seized it up. Unfortunately, I had not sprayed it with Liquid Wrench prior to today. You will need some exensions for your ratchet in order to get at it. I did not have a really long extension so I combined two 6" extensions. It was not budging so I encouraged it a little with a cheater bar. I tried to be patient because I had read on the Internet about people stripping the threads. Eventually, it broke loose.



Here's the threaded portion after removal.



As many other people have noted, getting the plug end removed can be a real pain. First, I tried the screwdriver method to try to unclip it. This was going very badly. I was concerned that I was going to break the part that remains on the truck for the next sensor. Then, I reread this thread again. I tried to use my middle finger to reach up on the top side of the plug, release the catch, and then use my remaining fingers on the same hand to remove the plug. It is only possible to get one hand up there at a time. In order to do this, I had to work blindly with my feet under the front bumper. Amazingly, despite my big hands, this worked very easily. Here's a closeup of the plug end of the sensor.



And here it is again after the plug was removed.



Installing the new one was easy. The Denso replacement came packaged with some anti-seize. There was plenty left over for future projects too. Here's the finished install.



Lastly, I used my new engine code reader to erase the error. I put the truck back down on the ground, started it up, and for the first time in months there was no engine light on.

Thanks again everyone for making this project go so well.
 

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Thanks for the great helpful posts above (and the photos). I had a P0031 code and tackled my front drivers side O2 sensor on my '03 Tundra yesterday. From start to finish, the job took me 18 minutes. I'm no 'check engine' light free. Total cost for the job was $80. $20 for the O2 sensor socket kit and $60 for the OEM Denso Sensor.
Thanks.
 

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I came back inside tonight in the middle of removing both front O2 sensors to reread this thread. I was having a real tough time separating the electrical plugs. I read MIKE-BUH comments:

To unclip the electrical connectors I found the screw driver trick too hard, and by hand it went easy - but you have to be on your back with your feet facing forward to be in position for this. For the passenger side clip, you press on the release tab with your index finger while flexing your pinky against the wires... it puts enough tension on the cable to pull the connector out. Curse and wail as needed.
He was absolutely right with my situation. They separated relatively easily by hand once you press in on that retaining clip.

I had already loosened both O2 sensors with the slotted sockets in the $17 kit on Amazon. I could only use the short black slotted socket with the 1/2" star socket so I could fit a long breaker bar socket wrench. The fit and obstructions from frame and steering reack and exhuast system precluded me from using the deep slotted socket. I don't know how others did it .

Also, I read the threads and bought a can of KANOLABS' Aero KROIL indsutrial penetrating oil.
KanoLabs.com
I sprayed the O2 sensors liberally with Aero Kroil yesterday. And I had her use the Sequoia this afternoon for her shopping trip. Five minutes after she returned I had the Sequoia Jacked up and I sprayed the O2 sensors again with Aero Kroil.

Getting to the Sensors with the socket in one challenge, finding a way to put a wrench to it is quite another another. But I finally tried the third socket (three in the kit sold on Amazon) which had a 1/2" star receiver (hole for the 1/2" breaker bar socket wrench) and figured I'd try it from the rear. This eventually worked for me. One good crack to break the seal and I could spin them out by hand after that.

So my advice is this should not be attempted without these tools:
  1. Industrial quality penetrating lubricant like Kanolab's Aero Kroil
  2. O2 Sensor socket kit from Amazon get the kit with three sockets
  3. long breaker bar socket wrench to provide leverage to loosen the O2 sensor
One more gotcha to watch out for - I am still mildly pissed at ROCK AUTO for the incomplete O2 sensor variants description on their site. I bought a DENSO universal kit without understanding this option had bare wires - no socket on the end. They enclosed crimp clips to splice into socket end of the uSED O2 sensor I just removed. I highly recommend ensuring you buy the DENSO product with the correct electrical plugs. I see they're about $25 higher priced but I'd trust that more than a crimped connector anytime.
I did take the effort to wrap the finished wires securely with electrical tape but still.....

Pulled the negative battery terminal to kill the CEL light, replaced it, fired it up and all seems good.

My thanks to everyone in this thread and other here at TundraSolutions that helped me prepare for this repair job.
 

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Thanks for the great helpful posts above (and the photos). I had a P0031 code and tackled my front drivers side O2 sensor on my '03 Tundra yesterday. From start to finish, the job took me 18 minutes. I'm no 'check engine' light free. Total cost for the job was $80. $20 for the O2 sensor socket kit and $60 for the OEM Denso Sensor.
Thanks.
I have a 2003 V6 Tundra and failed smog. The report said everything was good except the NO, which was at 2500 instead of 500! I also got a P0031 code. I've been reading through various posts and am debating about replacing the O2 sensor myself. Which one, and where exactly is this sensor/sensors for the P0031 code located? Thanks
 

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This all sounds very encouraging. Just a couple of questions.
1) My 03 4x4 4.7L Tundra has about 122,000 miles on it now. What is the likelihood that one of the remaining 3 sensors will go bad within the next 20,000 miles or so? I'd rather not crawl underneath again until my next oil change (bad knees).:rolleyes:

2) Does anyone have the recommended torque for tightening the new sensors?

Thanks! :ts:
 

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I took all the recommendations from this thread. After determining my passenger front O2 sensor is bad, I just ordered two front OEM Denso O2 sensors (PN: 234-4169).
If I'm going to crawl under my truck I might as well replace both front sensors.
I ordered the two sensors from Sparkplugs.com for just over $133. :tu: Paid for 2 day shipping, but had a $5 promo code so it made the shipping the same as standard UPS ground. :) I've used Sparkplugs.com in the past for parts to my other cars, but it has been a while.
The best I could find via local parts stores was $112 each for Denso OEMs, so it is worth the 2 day wait.
I will report back with any potentially useful information when the replacement is complete.
 

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This all sounds very encouraging. Just a couple of questions.
1) My 03 4x4 4.7L Tundra has about 122,000 miles on it now. What is the likelihood that one of the remaining 3 sensors will go bad within the next 20,000 miles or so? I'd rather not crawl underneath again until my next oil change (bad knees).:rolleyes:

2) Does anyone have the recommended torque for tightening the new sensors?

Thanks! :ts:
Manual states 32 ft/lbs. I think it's too high if anti-seize is used per my recommendation. See the DIY link in my sig below for more detail.
 

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Sorry, this is not Tundra, but Sequoia problem. I figure both has the same engine.

I have an 01 Sequoia, 130K miles, that has the engine check light on 2 days ago. Took her to Autozone, and was told that bank 1 O2 sensor need to be replaced. The Autozone guy clear the code using his tool, and so far the light has not back on.
Couple questions:
1. I have a trip coming up, about 2K miles total drive in the next few days. I probably wont have time to order the parts online which is cheaper. I would imagine local Toyota dealer is going to charge an arm and leg - will call and ask tomorrow. What are the chances that the engine light goes back on in the next 2K miles?

2. If it does goes back on, what are the consequences? Will the truck die and strand me in the middle of nowhere? Permanent damage to engine? When the engine light on 2 days ago, I was on interstate, the truck keep on going, did not feel anything, and I just drive her home, about 10 miles.

Thanks
Chris
 

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Sorry, this is not Tundra, but Sequoia problem. I figure both has the same engine.

I have an 01 Sequoia, 130K miles, that has the engine check light on 2 days ago. Took her to Autozone, and was told that bank 1 O2 sensor need to be replaced. The Autozone guy clear the code using his tool, and so far the light has not back on.
Couple questions:
1. I have a trip coming up, about 2K miles total drive in the next few days. I probably wont have time to order the parts online which is cheaper. I would imagine local Toyota dealer is going to charge an arm and leg - will call and ask tomorrow. What are the chances that the engine light goes back on in the next 2K miles?
[Very good. Matter of fact, it'll probably be back on within 100 miles.]


2. If it does goes back on, what are the consequences? Will the truck die and strand me in the middle of nowhere? Permanent damage to engine? When the engine light on 2 days ago, I was on interstate, the truck keep on going, did not feel anything, and I just drive her home, about 10 miles.
[No real immediate consequences other than possible poor gas mileage. And no, no engine damage. But you don't want to leave it like that.]

Thanks
Chris
Make sure you post up the exact CEL code as well.
 

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Duffy,
Thanks for the answer. Unfortunately, I did not ask for the exact CEL code - I guess I did not know what question to ask. I was just told oxygen sensor bank 1, so I went home, and do some research here. I definitely learned something new today. I think I am going to wait until I got back from my trip to fix this. I barely have time to get ready for the trip, just do not have time to deal with it now.
 

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This string was a Blessing. I had the 0051 error on my 04 Sequoia 4WD; the instructions above were precise and easy to follow. Thanks to the loan of a socket from O'Reilly's it took no time at all. The big surprise was how easy the sensor came out. A drench of PB, an hour to soak in and about of minute to run the engine before crawling back underneath to spin the socket. It was as though I knew what I was doing.
Y'all are great. Many thanks.:first:
 

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Just have to tell you guys, I just pulled the Bank 1 Sensor 1 one from my 02 4x4. Did what you said EricB with the only extra being that I used Seafoam Penetrator and a 2' extension with the low profile socket. It was like taking candy from a baby. Easy, easy fix. Sensor broke loose super easy and went on easier. Thanks for the great DIY info. This was a major help!
 
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