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Unfortunately when I did mine, one of them was seized in the manifold. Ended up with a new manifold as well as O2 sensor. The rear ones are easy as they are drop ins.

That's a good price for the two sensors. If you want OEM parts in the future, don't go to the dealer, try here Toyota Parts at ToyoMotorParts | Genuine OEM Toyota Parts or here Toyota Parts - Genuine OEM Toyota Auto Parts and Accessories That's where I get the majority of the parts form my Tundra, however, you still can't beat the prices you got for the sensors.

John
 

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Just finished installing the front, driver-side O2 sensor and it went like a dream. A couple suggestions…first, safety glasses are a must, don’t even think about this project without eye protection. Next, KROIL oil is awesome, it’s worth the cost. I sprayed it on, waited an hour and had no trouble getting the sensor out with the Amazon socket (I was able to get the large silver one onto the sensor with little trouble). I had the usual problem getting the electrical plug off. I’m left-handed so the recommended position of feet under the front bumper worked well…one suggestion, push in on the male end to release the tension on the clip, then push in the clip, that seemed to help. I too bought the DENSO sensor and it was a perfect match. This was a smooth, no-surprise repair thanks to everyone’s suggestions
 

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And another one done. Code P0051, passenger side upstream sensor. I guess I was one of the lucky ones. I bought the sensor at Autozone for $67.99 Denso part number 234-4169. I don't like Autozone cheap parts but this was made by Denso so I was not concerned about quality. I used the free loan-a-tool program at Autozone leaving a $30 fully refundable deposit for the 3 piece socket set. Pulled the truck on ramps, sprayed with WD-40 (the only thing I had). The motor was still too hot so I used a box fan leaned against the tires. Waited 30 minutes and sprayed the sensor again with WD-40 then started on the plug and had it loose in 30 seconds. When disconnecting and connecting the plug a very distinct click should be heard. Then I worked on the sensor. With little effort the sensor was loose. I thought the socket had just slipped off but the sensor was loose. Unscrewed by hand and put the included anti-seize on the threads and installed the new sensor tightening to a decent torque. Plugged in the sensor and was done. I was not sure how secure the plug was so I pushed it in a little more and heard the click telling me it was locked in. Most oil changes take me longer than this repair did.

Thank you to all who have contributed to this thread and to the member that posted the Denso part number which assured me I had the right one. My local mechanic said he could get the part for no less than $140.00 (with his mark-up I suppose) and would charge me $40.00 to change. This didn't seem bad compared to the dealer but was a lot more than I spent.

Oh and my Sequoia turned 200,000 miles last week.
 

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Can someone confirm that the sensors for the 2WD Tundra are identical for the left and right upstream and identical part number for left/right downstreams? Rock Auto and others specify left/right only when referring to the 4WD model. Denso lists a P/N of 234-4169 for upstream and 234-4161 for downstream.
 

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Just used Denso sensors (234-4169) from Amazon; paid $43 apiece plus shipping. Went in really easy and plugged into female sensor hookup with no problem. It does help sometimes to have small hands and be a contortionist. They had plenty of anti-seize as well. I looked at Autozone and O'Reilly's and they were about twice the price. My truck has been garaged for most of its 185,000 miles so the old sensors were not stubborn to remove at all.
 

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Just wanted to add my thanks to this thread. My 2003 Tundra was throwing the passenger front bank O2 sensor code and looking for a DIY I found this thread. Truck has 141k but a lot of outside use in Wisconsin and uneven PO maintenance. I was worried that I'd be one of the seized-in-the-manifold stories. Started spraying the sensor with PB blaster several weeks in advance, ordered sensors (figured I'd get all four and save on shipping since who knows when the other three will go) and the Lisle 12100 socket from Rock Auto. Replaced the sensor this morning. Came out pretty easily, threads started to bind after a couple of turns so I tightened it back up a bit, gave it another shot of PB Blaster, and came out smoothly. Great suggestion on using the small screw driver head to release the old connector. I pushed the new connector back in until it clicked, cleared the code, drove it and all good. Thanks again guys!
 

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Thanks to all who contributed to this and related threads. Bank 2 sensor 1 replacement went with no problems on my 2000 Tundra V8 thanks to the guidance given here. I wouldn't even have tried it without the benefit of this resource. In brief, Denso 234-4169 and Powerbuilt offset socket from Amazon, one-handed electric disconnect method, and liberal applications of Liquid Wrench (just because that's the brand I already had on hand). I was apprehensive about about removing the old sensor but it came free with no strain at all, probably helped by the fact that it had been dealer replaced many years ago. Again, thanks. Andy
 

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Just an FYI to those having problems with the bank 1 sensor 1 wiring connector removal. I spent 3 hours on and off trying everything I could find on the web for ways to get that stupid @$#&%^% connector apart. The screwdriver method, the though the wheel well method, the one handed(like you have a choice) push with one finger and try to pull out with whatever you can manage. What I ended up doing was getting a pair of needle nosed vice grips around the O2 sensor side of the connector and and then simply pushing the release with my left thumb and using whatever fingers I could to push on the vice grips and it slid right apart easy as pie. By the way, '02 Tundra 152k miles and that "original" O2 sensor popped right out, not seized a bit. In fact I didn't realize I broke it lose, lol.
 

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Hi,

My check engine light came on while returning from vacation, and I had to drive three hours until I reached the next town, where I pulled into a Toyota dealer. They read the code and the print out they gave me says:

P0155 Bank 1 Sensor 2 oxygen sensor
The dealer didn't have the part in stock, so I continued on home. The dealer charged me $70 to read the code. The dealer wanted $300 total, or another $230, to fix it, so I thought I would try to fix it myself. I'm guessing my local dealer won't give me $70 credit for having the code read, so the price I'm trying to beat is $300.

First, I need to order the right sensor. When I search for the code P0155 on google, it says P0155 corresponds to Bank 2 Sensor 1 rather than the Bank 1 Sensor 2 that my print out from the dealer lists. Which is correct? Ah, and I just noticed that on another sheet that the dealer gave me, it lists P0155 (Bank 2 Sensor 1). Can I do damage to by engine by continuing to drive with a Bank 2 Sensor 1 failure?

Next, there is an *upstream* sensor on amazon that has a question about whether the left and right sensors are the same:

https://www.amazon.com/forum/-/TxU50LV9KWWA8Z/ref=ask_dp_dpmw_al_hza?asin=B000C5SG54

and an answer from Victor Salazar, who has the exact same truck as me, a 2001 V8 Toyota Tundra, said that the left and right sensors have different length wires.

Anyway, on amazon I'm looking at the *downstream* sensor, part number Denso 234-4154 Oxygen Sensor for $48:

https://www.amazon.com/Denso-234-4154-Oxygen-Sensor/dp/B000C5SG8G/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8#Ask

and it doesn't specify left or right. Are the left and the right the same for the downstream sensors?

Thanks.
 

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Thank you all for this and related thread! I successfully replaced the Bank 2 sensor 1 on my 2004 Tundra V8 using information from this forum. The small flat head screwdriver worked for me after a little bit of WD40 and a lot of patience! The old sensor came off easy, new one replaced easy, and cleared the code. FYI....be sure to drive a few miles with the new sensor before taking it to get state inspection done. I had to come back after a day or two of driving to pass the inspection. The Check Engine light remained clear and I have my renewed sticker! Thanks Again!!!
 

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Thank you all for this and related thread! I successfully replaced the Bank 2 sensor 1 on my 2004 Tundra V8 using information from this forum. The small flat head screwdriver worked for me after a little bit of WD40 and a lot of patience! The old sensor came off easy, new one replaced easy, and cleared the code. FYI....be sure to drive a few miles with the new sensor before taking it to get state inspection done. I had to come back after a day or two of driving to pass the inspection. The Check Engine light remained clear and I have my renewed sticker! Thanks Again!!!
Thanks for the driving tips! I need to get an inspection right after I replace the sensor.

Were you really able to tighten the new sensor to 44 Nm (32 ft/lb) with the oxygen sensor split socket? That torque spec seems really high to me (in general, I'm not a mechanic), and I worry that the split socket will slip when applying that much torque. For that matter, I don't know how I will get the old one out if it's that tight.

Here's another thread on replacing the O2 sensors:

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/intake-and-exhaust/87436-p0135-check-engine-code-can-i/

I soaked my bank2 sensor 1 with PB Blaster for a few days, but when I put the split socket on it and attached my 8" socket wrench, I couldn't budge it. I bought a 17" breaker bar, but I'm a little leery of stripping the O2 sensor. I may have to take my 2001 Tundra into a mechanic to finish the job.
 

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Thanks for all the great information on this site. My P0155 Bank 2 Sensor 1 did not go well initially. I had a heck of a time getting the electrical coupling apart (as many others have). After screwing around with the various methods mentioned here-- with no luck-- I tried a different approach that I haven't seen on this thread.

I cut the sensor wires close to the sensor and pulled the old sensor out and replaced it with the new one. This left only the old connector and the four wires attached to the plug fitting on the wiring harness. I then lowered the truck and went at it from the top side. I unmounted the bracket on the back side using a 12 mm socket / wrench. This is the bracket that the plug retainer is attached to-- you can easily see it from underneath. There are two 12 mm bolt heads on the back of the bracket. The one closest to the driver's side is the only one holding the bracket on-- the one closest to the passenger side is a mount for a ground wire. After removing the bracket, the wire and cursed connector are easily accessed from the top side where there is plenty of room. It only took a minute or two to reattach the bracket, although it is a blind hole, it is not too difficult to rethread it by 'feel' and snug it up with a 12 mm socket. From there it was simply a matter of getting the correct orientation on the sensor plug and inserting it into the wiring harness socket until it clicked.

Of course, the best case scenario is that the connector comes off in a minute or two without any additional measures. But if you're reaching the end of your rope you may want to try the above method-- it worked for me and saved me some sanity.
 

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I just finished installing my P0155 Bank 2 Sensor 1 as well on my 2001 Toyota Tundra Limited. Over the course of a week, I applied PB Blaster four times. I also bought the three piece O2 split socket set on amazon, and after the third application of PB Blaster, I put the shortest socket on the O2 sensor, and I tried to unscrew it. The O2 sensor wouldn't budge. I didn't put too much effort into it, but I was worried that I would not be able to get it loose. I put some more PB Blaster on the sensor and let it soak overnight.

I decided to subscribe to the "let the parts get cold so they contract" camp, rather than the "start the engine and let it run for a minute so the parts get warm" camp. Luckily the weather changed and the temperature dropped 15 degrees. The next day, I decided to give the O2 sensor my full effort--and if I couldn't get the O2 sensor off, then I was taking the truck to a mechanic.

Once again, I used the short O2 socket and about an 8” long, 3/8” drive socket wrench. I securely seated the socket, then I put my full effort into turning the wrench--but the socket slipped. Oh boy. I endeavored to give it one more try. I put the socket back on the O2 sensor, but I couldn't connect my socket wrench because of the obstructions. Wait! The O2 sensor must have moved. Next, I pulled out the medium height O2 socket, which takes a 1/2” drive socket wrench, and I put a 3/8” to 1/2” converter on my 3/8” socket wrench, and I placed the medium height O2 socket over the O2 sensor. It was loose! I wasn’t able to unscrew the sensor too far because the wiring was still hooked up. Oh boy, next up was removing the infamous electrical plug.

I studied the new electrical plug carefully to see how it clicked into the female end. The plug is rectangular in shape, and one of the short sides has raised flanges that form a slot with a little nub sticking up in the middle of the slot that a clip on the female receptacle catches. I looked at the old plug/receiver combination and I saw a large metal clip on one side--the side opposite the side with slot and nub, and I thought that must be the clip you push in order to release the plug. The metal clip was hard to reach with my fingers and neither pushing down on it nor jamming a finger underneath it seemed to have any affect. I examined the old plug again, and the slot on the side opposite the metal clip just begged to have a screw driver jammed into it. Unfortunately, jamming two different size screwdrivers into the slot did not succeed in freeing the plug.

Next, I reached around to the back of the female receiver, and I tried pushing on it, but I could barely get my fingers back there, and it didn't seem to have any effect. Finally, I discovered the thing you actually need to push on(or pull)--it’s on the back of the female receiver, but it's offset towards the side of the plug with the slot on it, which gives you a little more room to work on it. I both pushed and pulled on that clip for a few minutes, all the while using another finger on that hand to try and nudge the wire to pull on the plug, but I couldn't get the plug out. I kept pushing and pulling on that clip while trying to nudge the wires to pull the plug out. Then I removed my finger from the back of the female receptacle, and I used my thumb and forefinger to gently pull on the wires, and the plug came out. Yeah!

Installing the new sensor was no problem. I also bought some thermal covering for the wires:

1/4” Allstar Performance ALL76600 Spiral Wire Loom

which was mentioned in one of the five star reviews of the Denso O2 sensor on amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Denso-234-4169-Oxygen-Sensor/dp/B000C5SG54

If you look at some of the pictures of the other O2 sensors on amazon, you’ll see a black sheath covering the wires. My O2 sensor came with that covering as well, and that may be all you need--but I put the spiral loom over the black sheath just in case. The spiral loom went on easily, so it wasn’t a bother.

I put on some of the brown anti-seize that came with the Denso O2 sensor on the threads. I was a little worried about the anti-seize, which tends to get over everything, because you have to insert the sensor into a blind hole. Once you get the sensor in the hole, if you have to pull it back out for any reason, the anti-seize will have gotten on the female threads, and either pulling the sensor out or trying to put it back in will cause the sensor to contact the female threads. I did have to pull my sensor out again because I couldn't get it orientated correctly. So, now I wonder if the business end will work properly with a little bit of anti seize on it.

I tightened the new O2 sensor as much as I could with the short O2 socket, and when the obstructions prevented me from tightening it anymore I switched to the medium height O2 socket. I tightened the sensor as much as I could without going overboard--I didn’t want to risk stripping the threads trying to get the torque up to the crazy tight 32 ft/lbs (42 Nm) that is speced. By the way, the tall silver O2 socket that comes with the 3 piece kit is too short to fit over the O2 sensor. The split on the side of the silver socket ends near the top of the socket(unlike the other two sockets where the split goes all the way up the side from top to bottom). Maybe the tall silver socket will fit over the rear sensors? I should have tested that while I was under there. Sorry.

Next up, resetting the Check Engine Light(CEL).

I unhooked the negative battery terminal as some suggested for erasing the code, and then all hell broke loose. My car alarm went off, and I couldn’t get it to turn off. I posted elsewhere about how I resolved that problem, but because the old links on this site are broken, I’ll post it here as well. First I’ll mention that I’ve read that some states will automatically fail you when you get an Emissions Inspection if you unhook your battery to erase the CEL code. Apparently, unhooking your battery erases all the codes, yet some codes are normally present, so when an inspector doesn't see any codes, they assume you are trying to fool the inspectors, so they fail you. As a result, I recommend buying a code reader that will allow you to reset only the CEL code--with the added benefit of not having to unhook the negative battery terminal and potentially having to deal with a car alarm problem and the resulting angst of your neighbors!

===

I thought I would report what worked for shutting off my car alarm for future searchers.

Under the dash there is a little black box that has the following on it:

IRS
Code Alarm
SAE PP-T20

There is a red light (which is not a button) that is built into the dash to the left of the steering wheel, and the red light flashes when the alarm goes off.

With the negative battery cable unhooked, I opened the driver's side door and I put the ignition key on the front seat. Then I proceeded as follows:

1. I put the negative battery cable back on the battery, which immediately set off the unnervingly loud car alarm.

2. I dashed to the driver's side door, grabbed the key, and jumped in leaving the door open. I fumbled the key into the ignition, and I turned the key clockwise--but not far enough to try and start the truck.

3. Then I reached under the dash, along the left side kick plate, and I pushed the little button.

The alarm immediately went off. I tried to start the car, but it was dead. Hmmm...what next? I got out of the truck, and I tightened the nut holding the cable to the negative battery terminal. While doing that, I decided to try the ignition again. I got back in the truck to see if the engine would turn over even one time...nothing. That set off some whirring noises underneath the dash that lasted about 3 seconds. Then I tried starting the truck again--and it roared to life.

I drove around, and now I am CEL free!
===

Next up: an Emissions Inspection.

After doing some research, I discovered that unhooking your battery cable (and maybe resetting the CEL with a code reader too?) erases all the codes in your onboard computer. Your truck has several "monitors" that check the various components of your engine, and they issue codes that indicate how things are performing. When you get a smog inspection, the inspector doesn't actually check the exhaust coming out of your tail pipe, instead the inspector checks your onboard computer to see what codes the "monitors" are issuing. When you unhook your battery, all the codes are erased, so the inspector can't tell how your truck is performing, so you will fail the test. Therefore, before you get an inspection you need to coax all the "monitors" to issue new codes. If a code isn't present for each monitor, you will fail your inspection, and you will have to pay for another inspection. I think some states allow the code from one monitor to be absent.

You can drive around and pray that all your monitors will issue new codes, but as reported in these forums some people have driven for months yet all their monitors still did not issue new codes. Car manufacturers are aware of this problem, so they publish "drive patterns", which target each monitor so that it will issue a new code. If you perform the drive patterns, then all your monitors should issue a new code, and your truck will be ready for an inspection. I found the drive patterns for 1996-2002 Toyota models here:

https://www.toyotaparts.metro-toyota.com/READINESS_MONITOR_DRIVE_PATTERNS_T-EG02-003.pdf

You need to know the engine code to use the chart, and the V8 engine is designated as 2UZ-FE according to:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Tundra

For a 2001 Tundra with engine type 2UZ-FE, the chart said I had to perform drive patterns 3,5,9, and 11. Then I paged down looking for the description of each drive pattern. I did not use a code reader or any other special equipment.

To perform drive pattern 3 where you have to drive 40-55 mph for 3 minutes followed by 34-45 mph for 7 minutes, I got up at 3AM and went out on the freeway. I drove at 53 mph for 3 minutes and 43 mph for 7 minutes. I was pretty sure that I was going to get pulled over for drunk driving for going 43 mph on the freeway at 3AM. Then I turned around and repeated the drive pattern for good measure on the way back.

You can combine drive patterns. For instance, you could perform drive pattern 3, then let your truck sit for 8 hours afterwards to fulfill drive pattern 5. I just assumed that performing drive pattern 3 would get the engine up to the required 176 degrees for drive pattern 5. You could also perform all the drive patterns in one outing, then let your truck sit for 8 hours. Note that your fuel level has to be between 1/2 - 3/4 full while performing the drive patterns, so you may have to burn off some fuel before you can perform them.

If you have a code reader with the necessary features, you can check whether all the monitors issued a new code before going in for a smog inspection. If one of the monitors did not issue a new code, then you could repeat the drive pattern targeting that monitor. I did not have a code reader, and after completing all the drive patterns, I went in for an inspection--and I passed!

I'm CEL free, and I'm good to go for another year. :)
 

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Just want to say thanks for all the suggestions on how to remove the connector on the front sensor. That turned out to be the hard part of mine. Someone must have changed it before because I almost broke my hand when it came loose so easy :) The sensor I took out had Toyota on it and Denso. The connector was a pain, but once I got a flashlight up in there to see how it worked it wasn't very hard at all. I hope to remember what it took when/if I have to do the drivers side.
Anyway, thanks again because of you guys I wasn't afraid to tackle this job and probably will some others down the road.

2003 Tundra Limited
 

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Hello Very new to this machine
Bought a 2004 v6 nice shape 173K miles
Check engine light.... looks to code p0032 ?
I am not sure of where this o2 sensor is?
and a part number for Denso is hard for me to find?
If I go to local auto and get their in stock 02 sensor if not a Denso will it still clear light ?

Any help would be listened to.
New BEEEE
Hap
 

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Hello Very new to this machine
Bought a 2004 v6 nice shape 173K miles
Check engine light.... looks to code p0032 ?
I am not sure of where this o2 sensor is?
and a part number for Denso is hard for me to find?
If I go to local auto and get their in stock 02 sensor if not a Denso will it still clear light ?

Any help would be listened to.
New BEEEE
Hap
Bank 1 Sensor 1 is the drivers side before the converter. Any new O2 sensor will probably clear the light but Denso or NTK sensors are easily available from RockAuto or Amazon and a couple days won't hurt a thing.
 

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I put in new sensor and cleared fault code. No cel as of now I will keep an eye on it. Without tips on this forum I doubt I could have did it.
What a great source for the tundra owner.
Thank you.
Hap
 
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