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After reading through many of the TPMS (Tire Pressure Monitoring System) related threads here and elsewhere recently, I thought I would post a consolidated list of general TPMS info. I just went through a TPMS change on my own Tundra and had to figure all this stuff out. Sorry for the long post, I hope it is helpful.

  • The TPMS sensors in the styled steel wheels are not compatible with Toyota alloy wheels. There may be some compatibility with aftermarket rims. If you switch rims you will need to either get a set for the new rims (if they don'talready have them) or put in standard valves/stems and live without the benefit of the TPMS. Alloy rims use 20 degree sensors, steel wheels use 40 degree sensors. I have read about ways to retrofit rims to accommodate different sensors, but I personally think the best way to do it is get a sensor that fits your rim correctly without modification or strapping hardware onto the rim.
  • I have seen sets of sensors for less than $200 on eBay. I personally bought a full set of used alloy rims with sensors and good tires for $225 last week on craigslist, I just had to be patient for the deal to come along.
  • You can run your Tundra without TPMS sensors. The result is that you have to look at the warning light on the dash perpetually. I ran without the sensors for about a year, and experienced no other side effects. I have read speculation that mileage changes, but I did not experience that myself. I spoke to several techs and service advisors, and none of them had any concerns about running without the sensors except that I would not have the benefit of a low tire pressure warning.
  • I strongly recommend NOT defeating the TPMS dash indicator by using tape in the instrument cluster or putting the out-of-service sensors in a pressure vessel or other methods. This is a safety-related system. If the system is not in use, it makes sense to have a reminder (dash indicator) in case someone else drives the truck, or if you sell it. Us older guys remember when we had to actually look at our tires and check the pressure manually, and if you defeat TPMS function, you should be doing exactly that. You should probably be doing that anyway, since keeping proper tire inflation can prevent improper tire wear, among other things. In my case, I am old and forgetful, and would risk forgetting such a modification. Just ask my ex-wife.
  • If you change your sensors from what was on the truck when new to any other set of sensors, or even an individual sensor, you need to have the TPMS computer reprogrammed to “see” the new sensor(s). You do NOT need to write down or otherwise manually record the sensor serial numbers to do this. They can be read electronically from outside the rim/tire by anyone with the right equipment. Which brings me to my next point:
  • Dealerships quoted me $100 to reprogram the TPMS system with new sensors in the wheels, and they wanted the vehicle for at least an hour. After a few phone calls, I found that Discount Tire had the necessary computer equipment to complete the reprogramming. The location I visited did it for free, and they did it in less than three minutes in the parking lot. Based on my experience I must assume that many tire dealers have the ability to perform this task, and will not charge the huge rates the dealerships want. I am guessing the Toyota dealerships simply don't want to deal with it, or have to be cautious with the liability involved with servicing a safety system.
Good luck with your truck!
 

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good point about discount tire. I was in there a while back and they had broken one on a GM and they were telling the customer they would get the sensor ordered and would be able to program it right there so as to avoid the dealership. some places might still send u to the dealer if they dont have the right stuff but i saw a book at NTB while getting my alignment done, it was a thick book laying on the service counter that had tire pressure sensor info for any vehicle imaginable with various instructions for their programmer for all the vehicles so i'd say more and more if not most have it now, like you said. good info and thoughts. thanks.
 

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Good post, I would just like to add 2 things. TPMS sensors are mostly a benefit to people that have not had the experience of having a tire go down while driving. I believe that people that check their tires regularly and have experienced flat tires don't really benefit too much. Also, I have my sensors in a cannister and have checked my mileage several times with the light on and off and notice about a 4% improvement in mileage with the light out. Even though there is a separate module for the TPMS, the main computer also reads this information.
 

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Good post, I would just like to add 2 things. TPMS sensors are mostly a benefit to people that have not had the experience of having a tire go down while driving. I believe that people that check their tires regularly and have experienced flat tires don't really benefit too much. Also, I have my sensors in a cannister and have checked my mileage several times with the light on and off and notice about a 4% improvement in mileage with the light out. Even though there is a separate module for the TPMS, the main computer also reads this information.
:rolleyes:
 

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Well Jon, you have a good portion of the information that is already here. You should separate the facts and the conjecture and we could use it as part of a sticky.

And I see this is your first post, welcome to the group.
 

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There is also a tool available for the DIY crowd:

Revolution Supply Co. - ATEQ TPM Quicket Device

This would be perfect for those who have sensors in multiple wheel sets. One could swap wheels at will and always maintain sensor functions.
i thnk thats the same manufacturer that was listed on the front of that book i mentioned...so its probally the same line of tools discount uses..good find..would be great for people who swap out tires for snow tires, etc...
 

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i thnk thats the same manufacturer that was listed on the front of that book i mentioned...so its probally the same line of tools discount uses..
Ah, neat coincidence. But maybe not since I haven't really seen other equivalents.

I've also found that tirerack.com sells the same TPMS reset tool, and for less than the company I linked to above. They will even automatically include one in your shopping cart if you're building a tire/wheel package according to specs for a Tundra and order TPM sensors.
 

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I had a dealership, Panama City Toyota, do it for free while I was having the TRD exhaust installed. It helps to build a good relationship with your dealership, if it's possible.

Later...
 

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I have a question that bears asking. In Washington State, I run two sets of tires/wheels, studs in the winter, and the smoothie good mileage tires in summer. If I get a second set of TPMS sensors for the winter tires, would I have to reprogram the ECU each time I change wheels and tires? Or is there enough room in the ECU memory to have 8 Sensors programed into my ECU? Right now, the winter tires have NO TPMS function, and the yellow light emits on the dash as soon as the tires stored on the garage wall get out of range. (Sometimes, this takes up to 10 miles for the ECU to figure out that the original tires are still in the GARAGE...) Go figure...
If I have to REPROGRAM the ECU every year, this would definitely NOT be worth it.

THANKS! Peacemakerpete
 

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I have a question that bears asking. In Washington State, I run two sets of tires/wheels, studs in the winter, and the smoothie good mileage tires in summer. If I get a second set of TPMS sensors for the winter tires, would I have to reprogram the ECU each time I change wheels and tires? Or is there enough room in the ECU memory to have 8 Sensors programed into my ECU? Right now, the winter tires have NO TPMS function, and the yellow light emits on the dash as soon as the tires stored on the garage wall get out of range. (Sometimes, this takes up to 10 miles for the ECU to figure out that the original tires are still in the GARAGE...) Go figure...
If I have to REPROGRAM the ECU every year, this would definitely NOT be worth it.

THANKS! Peacemakerpete
Only 4 sensors at a time can be programed in.
 

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I have a question that bears asking. In Washington State, I run two sets of tires/wheels, studs in the winter, and the smoothie good mileage tires in summer. If I get a second set of TPMS sensors for the winter tires, would I have to reprogram the ECU each time I change wheels and tires? Or is there enough room in the ECU memory to have 8 Sensors programed into my ECU? Right now, the winter tires have NO TPMS function, and the yellow light emits on the dash as soon as the tires stored on the garage wall get out of range. (Sometimes, this takes up to 10 miles for the ECU to figure out that the original tires are still in the GARAGE...) Go figure...
If I have to REPROGRAM the ECU every year, this would definitely NOT be worth it.

THANKS! Peacemakerpete
Twice a year. But For about $200 initial investment, you will be all set until they start dying.
The reason it takes so far is that you have to travel a certain distance and achive a certain speed to trip the sensor test

Does the spare have one also?

No sensor in spare, only 4 can be programmed at a time
 

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how do i just turn it off
 
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