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Discussion Starter #1
I know this probably belongs in the detailing forum, but I'm sure there are a few fellow OCD detailers here that will appreciate this shot. First rain we've had since I took delivery 3 weks ago today. Of course after the storm passed I had to check the beading of the synthetic wax, and this is what I found.

Mark
 

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Dang, thats some beeding for sure Id say!

Mines lived through its first hail storm yesterday. No scratches or dents that ive found.
 

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Nice beading shot!



There is my contribution, it has Meguiars #21 and Chemical Guys 50/50.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
:eek:

a) What wax is that?
b) How did you take that photo? (camera model)
When I bought the truck I got it home and did:

wash/clay
Einzettes Metallic Polish with PC on 5
Klasse AIO with PC on 4
Zaino Z2p with PC on 4 (about 6 layers)
Final layer of Prima Epic with PC on 4 (about 4 layers)

It sounds like alot, but the Prima Epic goes on so quick and easy I was doing a coat after every wash for awhile there.

The camera is just our old Nikon point and shoot.

Take care,

Mark
 

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ok, i have a question.
doesnt the paint need some time to set a bit before it is waxed or covered? i know my tundra was just built, and yes they cure them, but i still though at least another month before putting anything over it so it cant "breathe".
so what do you think?
 

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Your paint is fully cured from the factory and you are perfectly fine to wax away. There is no need for a wait time, the paint has already cured.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
ok, i have a question.
doesnt the paint need some time to set a bit before it is waxed or covered? i know my tundra was just built, and yes they cure them, but i still though at least another month before putting anything over it so it cant "breathe".
so what do you think?
Youre good to go. Put some protection on it right away.
 

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Uhh, yeah definatly. Water beading is *most* of the time a signal that the paint is fully protected from the elements (sun, rain, dirt, waterspots, industrial fallout).
 

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Uhh, yeah definatly. Water beading is *most* of the time a signal that the paint is fully protected from the elements (sun, rain, dirt, waterspots, industrial fallout).
Wax is nothing more than a petrloeum based product that temporalily fills minor imperfections, swirl marks and enhances gloss and beads water until it is either washed off or the heat from the sun bakes the petroleum off the car. Yes, some are much better than others and even those don't do squat for what you are claiming.

While waxing helps the appearnce the quality and the correct application of the clearcoat (needs 2 'dry' mils for max protection) is going to determine what permaeates it and stains it (like gasoline does on cheap clears), by nature the polyurethane clear is waterporoof and even if you waxed your ride every day of your life if it sees any type of daylight (UV doesn't care about clouds) and it lacks quality UV inhibotors in its resin system you are wasting your time beacuse its going to yellow and eventually peel because wax won't stop a thing.

Sure a freshly waxed car looks slick and beads water but that's about all its good for so whats the point of beading water other than you might have chance of air drying a freshly rained on vehicle with minimal waterspots? Of course the fastest way to produce a gloss on a finish is to add petroleum plus oils give you that false sensing of eliminating minor scratches and swirls marks when all that really happened was you filled them with oil/wax unless you actually took the time to correctly buff/polish these blemishes a way.

Keep this in mind too: if your Toy doesn't have 2 mils of actual clear on it from the factory even under the slim to none chance Toyota uses the best clear coat out there that lack of 2 mils will cost you durability, UV protection and gloss over time and perfect example was I painted my mom's 60K mile dent free 97 Camry which was 4M9 from the factory (that champagne color where the body never matched the door handles or bumpers from the factory) because the paint was detoriated to the point it was about to delaminate.

Sure the car had idiot proof Toy quality but it had an early 90's GM paint job and I haven't seen much improvement over the years.

I'll agree with the general consensus Toyota produces some of the highest quality mass produced vehicles at the moment but don't think for a second your factory paint job is more than medicocre. If it were they would warranty it for at least as long as the bumper to bumper warranty but they know better.

Also, the next time you look at a Toyota with a $699 paint protection package ask the salesperson in a concerned voice if that magical paint sealant is available to body shops in case your new car is wrecked and must be painted (because when you consider a gallon 'kit' that is just about enough to spray 2 Camry's allover of DuPont, Spies or PPG's best clear costs about $300 this magical paint sealant that costs $699 needs to replaced on these inferior panels that were freshly painted because wouldn't it be just devestating if these new panels faded faster than these old panels with the magic sealant on them :rolleyes: ) the typical line is something like any auto paint store carries it and every body shop has access to it.

I can tell you this for a fact: Over the last 15 years I have called on and sold to no less than 500 unique auto paint stores in the SE and have millions and millions of dollars automotive coating marketing experience in addition to my own painting experience and not only does this product not exist in an auto paint store or a body shop but you have purchased $699 in snake oil that hopefully yielded you a single hand glaze or hand wax job that will wash off in 3 to 4 weeks.

The only thing worse than paying for this package is paying the added dealer profit (usually about $499) on your sales sheet in the finance room. A tip here is you can bring up it and say you aren't going to pay it like a wimp then FI guy will make serious page to the salesperson who will in return back up the FI guy and say every spineless sucker pays this added dealer profit. Or you can say it with some balls and walk your arse out over it like a real man with a sack would. Everytime I've walked out over this pure BS I've been invited back and intially they try to counter it but tell them to get bent and they'll waive it. Only suckers pay made up fees on a piece of paper.



Great site BTW.:tu:
 

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Wax is nothing more than a petrloeum based product that temporalily fills minor imperfections, swirl marks and enhances gloss and beads water until it is either washed off or the heat from the sun bakes the petroleum off the car. Yes, some are much better than others and even those don't do squat for what you are claiming.
Uhh, a true wax will not do any of these things you speak of. To remove/fill imperfections swirl marks, you will need a paint polish. Not a wax, Jumbo or I never said that wax would do any of this. A quality car wax/sealant laid over a properly prepped surface (buffing with a machine polish and final polish), will protect paint and help keep it looking nice for years to come with regular paint maintinace. A car without wax will be exposed to the elements of Industrial fallout, sap, hard water, acid rain, and general dirt. These things will dull the finish overtime and result in clear coat failure unless proper prevention can be performed.

You speak of waxes that have petrolium, you are using or thinking of cheap cheap stuff. Most of the waxes/sealants I use (and the ones that Jumbo) uses are petrolium free, thus leaving nothing to "evaporate" off the surface.

I highly suggest reading at the site in my link, you may learn something about wax and paint.:) And I dont know about your rant on "dealer" protection packages, no-one in this thread says anything about this:confused:

I smell a troll guys, whut about yall?
 

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OK Brandon and Jumbo, I don't have the luxury of living in a dust/dirt free invironment ... not even close. I used to use Mequires car wash and spotted the tinted windows on my '98 and '03 'Runners and my wife's '98 Explorer. I'd wash part of the car and rinse, then repeat and allways keep it wet. Now I'm on well water and am afraid to wash my cars at home, so it's off to the car wash (I know). I have to drive on two miles of dirt road to get home and the cars are dirty by the time I get into the garage. I have used the Mr. Clean system and it seemed to work OK ... no spots on the windows of my F250 (traded in on my Tundra). I'm assuming that it's the filtered water that makes the difference. If so, is there a filter I can use other that the Mr Clean. What's the best way to wash my vehicles. Keep in mind that it takes me about an hour and a half and it gets hot in the summer.
 

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OK Brandon and Jumbo, I don't have the luxury of living in a dust/dirt free invironment ... not even close. I used to use Mequires car wash and spotted the tinted windows on my '98 and '03 'Runners and my wife's '98 Explorer. I'd wash part of the car and rinse, then repeat and allways keep it wet. Now I'm on well water and am afraid to wash my cars at home, so it's off to the car wash (I know). I have to drive on two miles of dirt road to get home and the cars are dirty by the time I get into the garage. I have used the Mr. Clean system and it seemed to work OK ... no spots on the windows of my F250 (traded in on my Tundra). I'm assuming that it's the filtered water that makes the difference. If so, is there a filter I can use other that the Mr Clean. What's the best way to wash my vehicles. Keep in mind that it takes me about an hour and a half and it gets hot in the summer.

I'm sure Jumbo will chime in here (feel like I'm jackin his thread). You need something called optimum-no-rinse-wash-and-shine. It's a waterless car wash. If your car is muddy, then take it and powerwash the mudd off. When you get home you mix up some of this soap in a bucket and take your wash mitt and wash one section at a time, no water needed. When you are done, dry it of with a chamois or microfiber. That's it, done. You dont need to get a hose out and you can do this in your garage.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
OK Brandon and Jumbo, I don't have the luxury of living in a dust/dirt free invironment ... not even close. I used to use Mequires car wash and spotted the tinted windows on my '98 and '03 'Runners and my wife's '98 Explorer. I'd wash part of the car and rinse, then repeat and allways keep it wet. Now I'm on well water and am afraid to wash my cars at home, so it's off to the car wash (I know). I have to drive on two miles of dirt road to get home and the cars are dirty by the time I get into the garage. I have used the Mr. Clean system and it seemed to work OK ... no spots on the windows of my F250 (traded in on my Tundra). I'm assuming that it's the filtered water that makes the difference. If so, is there a filter I can use other that the Mr Clean. What's the best way to wash my vehicles. Keep in mind that it takes me about an hour and a half and it gets hot in the summer.
I'm on well water too in our little town. I dont have a problem with spotting because I use a softner and deionized water. But even before that I didnt have any issues. Just change your habits and times. Wash in the shade or before dusk when the sun is at it s lowest point in the sky, or right after dawn if youre up that early. That will help out a ton. My truck takes me about 3 hours to get everything done correctly and thats in the Florida sun, down right brutal about 10 months out of the year.

Take a look at a system like this for your outside hose bib. CRSpotless.com - Wash, Rinse, and Walk Away Although not cheap, it makes all the difference in the world, and allows you to take your time and not have to rush the wash.

Try a different rinsing technique. After a wash, I'll take the nozzle off the hose and turn the pressure down a little bit and let the water trickle out. Start at the top of the car and work your way down. If your car is waxed and maintained the water will gather and sheet off in big clumps. With this process I can get a car almost 80% dry. Next I take a gas powered leaf blower to get the water out of the mirrors and door jambs. And also to get whatever little drops are left over from the first process. By combining both of these techniques it leaves me with a car that is about 95% dry and I havent even broken out a towel yet. Next I pull it in the garage and blot dry the remaining water drops with a quality microfiber waffle weave towel. Then I pop the hood and dry under there to keep if from blowing all over the car the next time its taken out. If youre driving a new 07 Tundra, pop the hood after a wash and see how much water pours out all over your front bumper.....its alot. If you have spotting on your windows you can try a quality detail spray and a good microfiber glass towel to clean them up.

Hope that helps,

Mark
 

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Thanks for all your help, Guys. I've got to get some wax on the Tundra, so it's got to be washed at home. It's too bad that by the time I get to pavement it's gonna be covered with dust. At least it'll be protected, though. It's embarrassing when I take the Vette out, too. Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Youre welcome, no problem. Although many waxes are better than others, just put something on it. It all really comes down to what "you" think looks best on your car, so just use what you like best and get some protection on that thing.
 
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