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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2010 Tundra SR5 Double Cab. Has 80k on it. When I bought it, it came with a set of fairly new Nexen Roadian SUV tires. It rode pretty well with no complaints. I wanted something more aggressive with better traction (The Nexens weren't the best traction wise) so I bought a set of Falken Wildpeak AT3W tires from Discount Tire Direct. The first installation I had done at Discount Tire. Afterwards, there was a shake in the steering wheel. I got an alignment done first, then I took it back and told them to "road force" balance the tires. Well the flunkies there did a half ass job road forcing and I just gave up. They didn't have the GSP9700 machine or anything.

So since the Tundra isn't my daily driver, I went and called around using the Hunter GSP 9700 locator. I found a local shop that does off road trucks and custom builds and got in with them. They did a road force balance ($125 total) and the shake was gone, but I still had a vibration from about 68-73 mph. Smoothed out after that. I also swapped the drivers rear for the front rear in a test. When I did that, it shook worse (like when I first installed it) so I swapped back and it went back to just being a wheel vibration. So I took it back and explained the issue. I asked specifically that they use the Haweka adapter (or similar) and they got it done today. They gave me the following info:
Drivers front: 5 lbs of road force, 0.25mm runout
Passenger front: 7 lbs of road force, 0.25mm runout
Drivers rear: 14 lbs of road force, 0.25mm runout
Passenger rear: 27 lbs of road force, 2mm runout.

But they said they didn't do any additional changes. Just left the actual spin balance like it was.

They force matched the rear passenger tire, and got it down to 20lbs of road force. However, after picking it up, i'm still getting a vibration in the steering wheel at those same speeds. It seems to be worse on certain road surfaces but it's pretty much all the time. I still have my old Nexens (one is the spare) but the rest are in a pile in my garage. I sent an email to Falken regarding the issues and am hoping to hear back tomorrow. Is there really anything else I can check? Those road force numbers seem really really good and well within spec, yet i'm still getting the vibration. The tires also are a bit louder when i'm turning or coming to a stop. Like it's not a grinding noise, but it's like a rubbing noise, but I know it's not rubbing because the tires are OEM size. But when i'm turning or coming to a stop, there is a rubbing type noise from the front end that I didn't have on the Nexens. Maybe that's the more aggressive tire, but i'm not sure. I didn't have things like that with my old Tahoe and it's Wrangler A/Ts so i'm not sure.

Any advice?
 

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The idea of road force balancing is to use the runout of the wheel at the bead seat to compensate for the loaded non-uniformity of the tire. This can make a huge difference, enough so that it is used on virtually every wheel/tire assembly at vehicle assembly plants.

There are some limitations that I suspect you are hard up against. To understand them, you have to understand a bit of detail about how the "force matching" is done. It does not simply match the "high spot" of the wheel runout to the "low spot" of the tire runout. Rather, it "models" the runout of the wheel as being a circle that is slightly off-center relative to the axis about which the wheel rotates. Further, it models the non-uniformity of the tire the same way, as a circle that is slightly off-center relative to the beads of the tire. It directs the technician to mount the tire such that the tire "circle" is opposite (i.e. 180º out of phase) with the wheel "circle".

The limitations of this should be immediately obvious. What if the tire non-uniformity is not round? What if the wheel bead surface is not round? What if the runout of the wheel is not what is required to compensate for the non-uniformity of the tire that it is mounted on it?

Technically, the "model" is called a "first order harmonic". What if there is a significant "second order harmonic", meaning the tire or wheel is misshapen a bit like a football? What if there is a significant "third order harmonic", meaning the tire or wheel is misshapen a bit like a triangle? What if there is a significant "fourth order harmonic", meaning the tire or wheel is misshapen a bit like a square? What if there are lots of harmonics, meaning the wheel or tire is quite irregular?

If any of these second, third, or higher harmonics are present, then you can force balance the wheel/tire assembly all day and it will still roll down the road like a football, a triangle, a square, and so on.

This is why there is no substitute for a quality tire and wheel. As the old saying says: All you can do is all you can do.

Now, let's look at the numbers a bit. The passenger/rear tire/wheel has "27 lbs of road force" and "2mm runout". The scale factor is that 0.001" of net runout gives rise to 1 lb of "road force". This means it has 0.027" of net runout. But there is 2mm = 0.080" of runout in the wheel, which means a large wheel runout is being used to compensate for a large tire non-uniformity.

Why does this wheel have so much more runout than the others? I strongly suspect that a pothole has bent this wheel, and so I suspect it is not quite round any more.

Why does this tire have so much more runout than the others? I strongly suspect that these are not high quality tires (which their low price reflects), and the passenger/rear tire might be defective.

Combine the two and I would expect it to thump down the road. Perhaps that is what is causing the vibration.

You can test this easily. Swap that wheel/tire assembly with your spare and see if the problem changes. If it goes away, you've found where the problem is.

You state that your tires "are a bit louder when i'm turning or coming to a stop", and when you are "turning or coming to a stop, there is a rubbing type noise from the front end". This, to me, is not surprising. Look at the tread pattern. The sides of the lugs at the tread edge have a "step" to them. When you turn a corner, a given lug at the tread edge rolls down and comes into contact with the roadway. On the left side of the vehicle, the "step" in the leading of the tread lug hits the pavement first, then the "valley" at the trailing edge. This will make that tread lug squirm, and you'll hear it as a "growl". On the right side, the reverse happens: the "valley" at the leading edge of the lug hits first, then the "step" at the trailing edge. This will make the tread squirm, but differently, and you'll hear it as a "growl", but a different growl. The irregularly shaped tread lugs in the center of the tread pattern do the same thing on braking. It doesn't surprise me that all this sounds like the tire is rubbing something, because it is; it's rubbing the road surface as the tread lugs squirm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Well that's certainly quite the response. I appreciate it.

First off, I was pretty confident in purchasing the tires. I read a lot of reviews, and it seemed like a lot of light truck users were very happy with the tires over time, they wore well and rode well. So I wasn't too worried about purchasing them, despite the relatively low price.

So in terms of the tire, if there is an issue with that rear tire, would it result in a steering wheel vibration? I guess that doesn't really make sense, it seems like I would feel it in the seat of my pants or elsewhere in the truck, but it really seems focused on the steering wheel.

I never had an issue like this before i got the new tires though. It started immediately after the new tires. So if the wheel was bent, wouldn't it make sense that I would have felt it with the old tires?

I should have a chance to put the spare tire on in the next week and try it out. Hopefully it's actually balanced and doesn't have the same problem. Given it was mounted by Discount Tire first, i'd be skeptical. But the spare is one of the old Nexens, so it won't be the same tread pattern, but it's the same size and everything so it should be good.

If I swap the spare tire in, and it doesn't go away, what would you suggest for a next step?
 

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So in terms of the tire, if there is an issue with that rear tire, would it result in a steering wheel vibration? I guess that doesn't really make sense, it seems like I would feel it in the seat of my pants or elsewhere in the truck, but it really seems focused on the steering wheel.
It could, but it's not likely. However, if it exists, it might not be the only problem.


I never had an issue like this before i got the new tires though. It started immediately after the new tires.
That amounts to a big finger pointing at one or more defective or low quality tires.


So if the wheel was bent, wouldn't it make sense that I would have felt it with the old tires?
Not nessarily. It could be they are better quality, not defective, and road force balanced wherein the wheel runout was a good match to the tire runout. Keep in mind that what I mean by "better quality" in this context is "more uniform construction".

If I swap the spare tire in, and it doesn't go away, what would you suggest for a next step?
Try it with all four tires and see what happens. If the problem goes away with one such swap, then you've found the culprit. If it doesn't go away, but changes a bit with each of several swaps, then you've found several culprits.

The fix is likely to be replacements for one or more tires. If it were my truck, I would replace all four with Michelin's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I got a reply back from Falken. They are going to warranty out my two rear tires and get me two new ones, no questions asked. I'm still going to swap out for the spare here in a few days and see what happens with it. I read a few posts online from folks (arguably in other types of cars) that did have vibration issues in the wheel that were fixed with new rear tires. So I guess it's worth trying out.

Once I get the new tires under warranty, i'm gonna put them on the stock rims. I'm not gonna worry about buying a rim yet. If the tire is in good shape, even with the slight rim runout, they should be able to force match the tire to compensate right? I would imagine like you said that the combination of a bad tire and a ran out rim would cause this issue to be magnified. So even if the rim is still slightly bent, if the tire is in better shape, I would feel less of it (as evidenced by the last set of tires)
 

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I would swap out the spare for the current rear wheel/tire assemblies in hopes of diagnosing the problems, all before replacing the rear tires. Knowledge is power, right?

Keep in mind that a road force balance is not perfect. There are two rules to remember: 1) if the runout of a wheel exactly compensates for the non-uniformity of a tire, it is a pure coincidence, as there is no reason to expect one to match the other except by coincidence; and, 2) a perfect wheel cannot be used to compensate for the non-uniformity of a tire mounted on it.

The ideal is a very good wheel and a very good tire, as the small amount of runout in the wheel can be use to compensate for the small amount of non-uniformity in the tire, resulting in a small residual runout (if any), and both are likely to be relatively round, as opposed to "lumpy". I have Toyota OEM alloy wheels on my '00 Tundra and '01 Sequoia, and none has a runout that exceeds 0.002". Even so, my Michelin's roll very smoothly.

I presume that your "stock rims" are Toyota OEM alloy wheels. If so, I heartily encourage you to try them. My concern is how well they roll, not how they look. I don't sit in my garage admiring mine, I can't see them when I'm driving, and I don't care what anyone else thinks of how they look.

With that in mind, beware a problem, should you go shopping for other wheels. My Toyota OEM alloy wheels are "hub-centric", meaning they are located on the hub relative to the axis of rotation of the axle by the center hole of the wheel fitting snugly on the hub, with the lug nuts simply clamping the wheel onto the hub. When the wheel/tire assembly is properly balanced by mounting the wheel on the balancer so it is centered on the shaft via the center hole, a proper hub-centric mounting then makes it rotates around the same axis on the balancer that it does on the vehicle. Don't discount the importance of this, and beware the notion that any technician can balance a wheel properly without training.

Example: If a 60 lb wheel/tire assembly that is in perfect balance on the balancer is mismounted by 0.005" compared to when it's on the vehicle, then it will be 0.6 ounces out of balance on the vehicle. A tire shop can chase this problem for a week and never find it. It is difficult, if possible at all, to explain this to the guy operating the balancer. Been there, done that, many times.

The difficulty in buying an aftermarket wheel is making sure this doesn't happen, and there is no good way to find out if it does except by making some very careful measurements and observations of the wheel and the hub. People often buy wheels because they're pretty, not because they're round or because they fit the hub they're used with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I would swap out the spare for the current rear wheel/tire assemblies in hopes of diagnosing the problems, all before replacing the rear tires. Knowledge is power, right?
I'm planning on doing that tonight. Since it's not my daily (my wife and I carpool) I don't drive it but once or twice a week, usually on the weekends. Have an early conference call tomorrow morning though so i'll be driving it and trying it out. Since the warranty process with Falken is gonna take a while, i'm gonna go to Discount tomorrow after work and have them start the warranty claim. The Discount I originally went to didn't have the GSP9700 and didn't know how to use the road force (They had some old machine with the drum, but I watched them and they didn't do it right, and when I asked about the adapter, they just scoffed) but there is another Discount close to my house that does have the GSP9700 and I'm gonna take it to them instead. But I won't be replacing the tires tomorrow or anything, i'll have to wait until they get them in.

Keep in mind that a road force balance is not perfect. There are two rules to remember: 1) if the runout of a wheel exactly compensates for the non-uniformity of a tire, it is a pure coincidence, as there is no reason to expect one to match the other except by coincidence; and, 2) a perfect wheel cannot be used to compensate for the non-uniformity of a tire mounted on it.
Makes sense

The ideal is a very good wheel and a very good tire, as the small amount of runout in the wheel can be use to compensate for the small amount of non-uniformity in the tire, resulting in a small residual runout (if any), and both are likely to be relatively round, as opposed to "lumpy". I have Toyota OEM alloy wheels on my '00 Tundra and '01 Sequoia, and none has a runout that exceeds 0.002". Even so, my Michelin's roll very smoothly.
It's my understanding that a low road force number would mean a pretty uniform wheel/tire combo right? I mean, 5 and 7 lbs of road force is pretty good based on what i've read on the subject. My understanding is that a high road force on a uniform (or close to uniform) wheel (such as my rear drivers assembly) would point to an out of round tire yes? So based on that, my fronts should be pretty darn good, and mostly uniform?

I presume that your "stock rims" are Toyota OEM alloy wheels. If so, I heartily encourage you to try them. My concern is how well they roll, not how they look. I don't sit in my garage admiring mine, I can't see them when I'm driving, and I don't care what anyone else thinks of how they look.
Yep. They are these wheels:



With that in mind, beware a problem, should you go shopping for other wheels. My Toyota OEM alloy wheels are "hub-centric", meaning they are located on the hub relative to the axis of rotation of the axle by the center hole of the wheel fitting snugly on the hub, with the lug nuts simply clamping the wheel onto the hub. When the wheel/tire assembly is properly balanced by mounting the wheel on the balancer so it is centered on the shaft via the center hole, a proper hub-centric mounting then makes it rotates around the same axis on the balancer that it does on the vehicle. Don't discount the importance of this, and beware the notion that any technician can balance a wheel properly without training.

Example: If a 60 lb wheel/tire assembly that is in perfect balance on the balancer is mismounted by 0.005" compared to when it's on the vehicle, then it will be 0.6 ounces out of balance on the vehicle. A tire shop can chase this problem for a week and never find it. It is difficult, if possible at all, to explain this to the guy operating the balancer. Been there, done that, many times.
This is why the Haweka "Finger" adapter is used right? So that you are not risking the balancing machine be off centered (ie with "cones")? They did use that adapter the last time I had it balanced, as I requested it specifically. The shop that I was using the last two times (with the GSP9700 machine) definitely knew what they were talking about.

Unfortunately, Aftermarket rims are not really in the budget right now. If I swap out the rear passenger for the spare, and it rolls smooth with the old tire, then I will see if when they install the new Falkens on the rear, if they will put it on my OEM first and do a force balance. If it matches up, great. If not, i'll have them pop it on the spare rim (yay black steelies) and balance that guy out, and if it rolls smooth, i'll just run with a steelie until I can get a new OEM wheel bought to replace it (about $130). I've seen guys on Craigslist in my area selling full sets of TRD rims and such, and those look really good, and i'm guessing they swapped them out with aftermarket, but unfortunately I don't want to get in the same situation where I get an out of round rim possibly.

If I can minimize the vibrations for the time being, and get rolling on 4 good tires, i'll be happy. Perhaps invest in some aftermarket in the future.
 

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It's my understanding that a low road force number would mean a pretty uniform wheel/tire combo right? I mean, 5 and 7 lbs of road force is pretty good based on what i've read on the subject. My understanding is that a high road force on a uniform (or close to uniform) wheel (such as my rear drivers assembly) would point to an out of round tire yes? So based on that, my fronts should be pretty darn good, and mostly uniform?
Generally, a low road force number does mean a pretty uniform wheel/tire combo, but not necessarily. It could be due to a round, but off-center wheel and a round, but off-center tire, both of which are off-center by about the same amount, such that one compensates the other fairly well. Such a situation may be "lumpy", but it would not be "lumpy" by a large amount. So, the conclusion is generally correct that a low road force number means the tire/wheel combo will roll fairly smoothly if it is properly balanced.

Conversely, a high road force number on a uniform wheel indicates a non-uniform (i.e. out of round, or defective) tire.

All this means your fronts are likely much better than your rears, and probably are not a problem.

Keep in mind that a tire that is out-of-round is the usual across most of the industry. I strongly promote Michelin for good reason, which is partly from my own lengthy experience with them, but also from a simple observation: of all the thousands of tires I have seen rotate on a wheel balancer and during wheel alignment, the only tires that were always round, and I mean round as if they were turned on a lathe, were Michelin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So I took your advice. Tonight I took my spare off that had the old Nexen on it (I say old, it was almost brand new). Started at the worse tire, which was the passenger rear. No change. Huh. Rear drivers's side: No change. Frustrated, I went to the front. I swapped the drivers front tire with the spare. No change. Argh really. So finally I replaced the passenger front tire. That made a difference. It was much smoother. A vibration still existed on the highway, but under acceleration it was much smoother, and coming to a stop it felt smoother. Around curves it was smoother. I set the cruise at speeds between 67 and 73 and incremented up and down. At each speed it was much much smoother. The only vibration i'm guessing was coming from the spare tire not being perfectly balanced (I'm gonna guess Discount didn't put a lot of effort into balancing the spare, and also it wasn't road forced soooo).

So at this point, it definitely appears to be the front passenger tire that's defective. Strange because it had a low road force, and the wheel had very little runout.

One other interesting observation. The truck has been sitting in my garage for the past 2 days (since Monday evening) and it wasn't overly cold (~50 degrees in the garage) and when I first left the house and hit the highway (i live like 3 minutes from the highway) the steering wheel shook like a mofo for about eh, 3-4 miles and started smoothing out. After driving for about 10 minutes it smoothed out. it still vibrated mind you, but it wasn't shaking like crazy. I haven't been able to test this, as I put everything back together tonight and put the spare back under the truck, but i'm wondering if maybe that tire has some sort of defective compound that is causing it to develop flat spots. I mean, i've never had a tire that after sitting for 2 days develops a flat spot and shakes like that. And I didn't read that in any reviews.

So I contacted Falken and I'm going to still try for two replacements, but instead of both rears, i'm gonna see if I can do the front passenger and rear passenger.
 

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So at this point, it definitely appears to be the front passenger tire that's defective. Strange because it had a low road force, and the wheel had very little runout.
A good test, and a most excellent eye-opener, isn't it? My hedge was, "All this means your fronts are likely much better than your rears, and probably are not a problem." This is why tests are worthwhile. Nicely done!

The first order harmonic is what the balancer shows and tries to fix, and it's low. At least one higher order harmonic is not low and is significant, which means the tire is "lumpy". This is something that cannot be fixed.

I mean, I've never had a tire that after sitting for 2 days develops a flat spot and shakes like that. And I didn't read that in any reviews.
A long time ago, this was very common, but I haven't experienced it in over 40 years.

Bottom line, for what it's worth: The bitterness of poor quality lasts longer than the pleasure of a low price. Your tires appear to be lumpy, noisy, and not all the same. There are much better tires out there. The judgment call is up to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
A good test, and a most excellent eye-opener, isn't it? My hedge was, "All this means your fronts are likely much better than your rears, and probably are not a problem." This is why tests are worthwhile. Nicely done!

The first order harmonic is what the balancer shows and tries to fix, and it's low. At least one higher order harmonic is not low and is significant, which means the tire is "lumpy". This is something that cannot be fixed.
So another eye-opener, apparently the places you think will be able to figure something out aren't that great. The shop I took it to before said that the front tires were fine. Apparently they didn't do something right, or something is wrong with their machine. Discount Tire put the front passenger wheel on the road force machine (using the lug adapter FWIW. Guy said they do that on all the Toyotas which was refreshing. Considering the first Discount I went to didn't have a clue about the adapter) and ran all the tests. Said it showed like 28 lbs of road force. So he used the machine to tell him where to rotate the tire around on the wheel and so he dismounted it, moved it around and ran it again. Then he put it back on the truck and did the other three. Came in and said "yea that one is definitely bad" he said even after force matching it, it still had over 20 lbs of road force. So they did the warranty claim with Falken and I should have the new tire next week.
 

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Thanks for the update on your issue.
We can all learn a little something here ! :surprise:
I just did. I'm having the same exact problem with a set of General Grabber AT2 tires. Had them balanced twice, to no avail. Gonna start swapping each one out and see what happens.....


Sent from my LG-H932 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well the final update. Discount finally got the new tire in. Got it mounted and road force balanced and I can say I no longer have the vibration issues on the highway. So it was definitely just a bad tire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well maybe not the final update. The majority of my vibrations are gone but I STILL have some minor vibrations around 70 MPH. It seems more prevalent on certain road surfaces, others are smoother than others. Interestingly enough, when I'm holding the steering wheel with my arm resting on my door, it feels much smoother than when I one hand it with my right arm not resting on anything. It feels like there might be a vibration in the entire truck so maybe it's cancelling it out? Anyway it's definitely annoying. Below 65 MPH it's much smoother. I'm gonna call Discount back and see if I can bring it in an evening this week and have them take a look at the road force balances again. Saturday they were slammed and while the guy I talked to last time was doing it, he didn't have time to do a full diagnostic on it. So maybe if I bring it in tonight he can take the time to look at it more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The fix is likely to be replacements for one or more tires. If it were my truck, I would replace all four with Michelin's.
So this is what I ended up doing. After talking to the guy at Discount, and doing some looking online, it became clear to me that my vibrations were just the way that All Terrain tires rode and I would have to live with it. So this morning after they balanced it (which would be the sixth time on this set) I just said forget it, and told them to put on a set of Michelin LTX MS/2 they had in stock. They aren't beefy A/T tires like the Wildpeaks, but I did some soul searching and realized I didn't need that type of tire. I have a 2WD truck that the most off road I go is some gravel roads and maybe some wet grass. A good set of all seasons that will last me forever is all I really need. So tonight I picked it up, and it rides so much better. The only vibration is the road feel, which pretty much matches what I feel in my 2016 Jetta family car on the same road surfaces. It's so much quieter and rides so much better around town too.
 

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Excellent.

I think you made the right decision for the right reasons, and decision making doesn't get any better than that.

And, for what it's worth, you might find the offroad performance of those tires a bit surprising. I lived offroad for over 3+ years in the mountains of northern New Mexico, where my wife and I often needed 4WD to get out of our driveway in winter. We were NEVER stuck with my '00 Tundra or her '01 Sequoia. Both were on Michelin LTX M/S at the time. They are excellent on any pavement, and on gravel, sand, mud, water, snow, and ice. We did not go "off-roading", rather these were the surfaces we had to drive on where we lived.

A funny story might cap it off.

My brother and I used to hunt deer in western Missouri (I worked in Missouri for 23 years). One year, we met up there the day before the season opened, with me in my Tundra and him in his Bronco II. There was an inch or so of snow on the ground, and the following morning, it began snowing heavily. By 8:30 that morning, there was a foot of snow everywhere, but it wasn't super cold; the ground under the snow was a mite soft. Everywhere his Bronco II went, on his super-aggressive "Mud Campaigner" tires, my Tundra went, and vice-versa. It was over hill and dale, across plowed fields, and through the woods, all in a foot of snow over soft ground. When he got home, he sold the Bronco II, bought a used pickup, and put reasonable tires on it.

My prediction is: the more you drive on those tires, the more you'll like 'em, and the more you'll be pleased with this decision.

Well done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Excellent.

I think you made the right decision for the right reasons, and decision making doesn't get any better than that.

And, for what it's worth, you might find the offroad performance of those tires a bit surprising. I lived offroad for over 3+ years in the mountains of northern New Mexico, where my wife and I often needed 4WD to get out of our driveway in winter. We were NEVER stuck with my '00 Tundra or her '01 Sequoia. Both were on Michelin LTX M/S at the time. They are excellent on any pavement, and on gravel, sand, mud, water, snow, and ice. We did not go "off-roading", rather these were the surfaces we had to drive on where we lived.
Yea I live in the city of Kansas City, where the worse roads we've had this year were in my neighborhood since the rest of the city does great with the snow routes. I bought a 2WD truck since I lived in Oklahoma (Norman) for 7 years and I had a 4WD Taco at one point, and then I got a 2WD Tahoe. For the amount of snow we got, the 2WD did great with the right tires (which were Wrangler ATS tires). So when I moved up here, I decided to save money and buy a 2WD Tundra since I wanted a truck, but 4x4 models easily fetched +$4k. If I lived in a more rural area where they don't plow roads for days, i'd consider getting something beefier, but probably not as beefy as the Wildpeaks.

My prediction is: the more you drive on those tires, the more you'll like 'em, and the more you'll be pleased with this decision.

Well done.
That's the hope. I'm going on a few long road trips the next month, including a vacation driving 3k+ miles pulling a small trailer (RPod) so i'll get plenty of miles put on them.
 

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I lived in Oklahoma (Norman) for 7 years
Small world. I live in Newcastle, and I hail originally from Moore.

I'm going on a few long road trips the next month, including a vacation driving 3k+ miles pulling a small trailer (RPod) so i'll get plenty of miles put on them.
Let us know how it goes. I expect you'll be quite pleased.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Saga isn't quite over. I thought things were fine, but I took a long road trip this last weekend down to Fayetteville, AR, in which I noticed a vibration/wheel shake 75+. Much worse at 80. On my way back (this was like a 400 mile trip) I noticed it seemed worse. So this week I needed an oil change, so I took it to my local Toyota dealer since they sent me a coupon (yay savings) and I figured they'd be competent in helping me diagnose, since I had done everything. Jacked it up and checked for play, etc. The only thing I didn't do was rotate the tires.... So first, they ignored my speed and got it up to 70 and said "well seems fine to me". Luckily that was at 1pm so they said "if you want, you can have a tech ride along while you drive it" well don't mind if I do. So I got it up to 75 on the highway and sure enough, it did it. Got it up to 80, had him feel the wheel, etc. So he said "alright i'll take a deeper look" took it back and let them have it another day. They had it on the lift twice inspecting all the suspension components and everything looked good. So they called me today and they told me they took off the tires and gave them a balance. Apparently the right front tire had over 60# of road force on it! So they rotated it around on the wheel, and it still had over 30#. You've got to be kidding me... So they moved one of the rears to the front, and it drove great (they said. I haven't picked it up yet) So i'm going back to Discount on Saturday to get the defective(?) tire (which is now on the back) replaced. It's interesting that it was fine after I had it installed, but got worse over time. That definitely seems unusual. I asked about the wheels being out of round or defective, and they said they were fine.
 
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