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Discussion Starter #1
First off I should mention that before I visited this forum regularly I had no intention of installing a Magnaflow muffler on my Tundra. Needless to say, I've had it on my truck for a few weeks now and couldn't be happier!:D Only problem is that now I have the header bug and after reading about them here, I want them on my truck like right now!:devil:

Anyone know who's got the best pricing on these? Is there really a performance difference associated with the different header finishes (stainless vs. ceramic), or is it simply an appearance preference? Are the JBA headers long or short tube? It is my understanding that long tube headers are better for low end torque, but not sure if JBA has a choice between the two. And, would there be any benefit to installing the header wrap like they do on some race car, or is that something that has no business in a street driven vehicle much less a truck?

Sorry for all the questions. Just want to make sure I'm in the know before I pull the trigger on these bad boys.
 

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IMO, the ceramic coating isn't worth the extra money. I work with a guy who races dirt cars. He ran a set of ceramic coated headers that lasted 3 races before the welds started cracking because of the extra heat being held in. There is alot of extra room in our engine bays, so I don't think heat will be an issue. I've had uncoated stainless headers for a year now with no problems.
 

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Never use header wrap, as it will accelerate oxidation of the primaries due to the heat being retained underneath.

The issue with coatings is cost versus longevity. It is not like they add $30-40 to the headers....in some cases they can approach the cost of the headers themselves. I don't mind paying for performance though, but I never had a coating last more than a couple seasons before rust could be seen. Essentially they give you the equivalent of ~2 sandblast / high heat rattle can jobs for about ten times the money. Not worth it IMO. :td:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Never use header wrap, as it will accelerate oxidation of the primaries due to the heat being retained underneath.

The issue with coatings is cost versus longevity. It is not like they add $30-40 to the headers....in some cases they can approach the cost of the headers themselves. I don't mind paying for performance though, but I never had a coating last more than a couple seasons before rust could be seen. Essentially they give you the equivalent of ~2 sandblast / high heat rattle can jobs for about ten times the money. Not worth it IMO. :td:
I'm assuming your referring to the ceramic coating, correct? So, you would agree with Johnny 5 that ceramic isn't necessary? I guess I'll go with stainless then. Any decently priced vendors come to mind?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
AJ USA has posted the best prices for the JBA headers.
Thank you sir!

Still undecided between JBA and DT. Seems to be that the DT ones make gains lower in the rpm band, which is what I am looking for. For some reason though, I don't see them listed for the 1st gen tundra on their site. Do they still make them for the 1gen?
 

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hi, although it has been a while since i bought , & many of us bought JBA or DT headers.
they were at the time around $450.
i bought my JBA shipped for 455, from tundra racing.
i also bought from the dealership OEM headers gaskets. PLEASE buy them.
good luck,
gorilla
 

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Are the JBA headers long or short tube? It is my understanding that long tube headers are better for low end torque, but not sure if JBA has a choice between the two.
i am open to correction here... and i have only seen jba or dt headers for gen1's of the short tube variety. the only long tubes i have seen are the pacesetters.
 

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hi, although it has been a while since i bought , & many of us bought JBA or DT headers.
they were at the time around $450.
i bought my JBA shipped for 455, from tundra racing.
i also bought from the dealership OEM headers gaskets. PLEASE buy them.
good luck,
gorilla
Correct me if I'm wrong here Gorilla, but haven't members been getting a better, more robust product and a better seal with the Percy's gaskets? If memory serves, there was a lengthy writeup on the differences. I think it was even one member who went with ones that came with his JBAs, had problems, then went the OEM route, had problems as well, then got the Percy gasket and that solved the sealing problems...
 

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The only long tubes I have seen are from S&S, but you would have a hard time finding them as they are discontinued.(as far as I know). The Doug Thorleys seem to have longer primaries than the JBA's, maybe its just the tri-y design. The Jba's are shorties only, but they will give you some help in the torque department. I think the closest you can get to long tube these days is high priced TRD headers.

I agree, get the plain stainless, after talking to a few members here I was convinced to do the same. The coating seems to be more trouble than it's worth. I'm happy with mine so far. When I installed mine, I got nuts from Toyota, and gaskets from Percy's. I know some have had good luck with using OEM gaskets, but when I compared mine to Percy's I felt the added surface area was good insurance. So far no leaks. Look into the headers thread right here for more info on JBA's.
http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/1gen-tundra/181308-jba-headers-installed/
 

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I can give you the results of my experience with headers, however, it is all on engines that are essentially dinosaurs compared top the Toyota V8; my Tundra is still stock as the day it was made.

In 1970 or '72, I put a set of painted mild steel long tube headers on a 350 Chevy in my '59 truck. In '80, I replaced the engine with a new warmed up 350, and sandblasted the outside of the headers and repainted them; there were no leaks or broken weld extant at that time. Today, they are still intact, and do not leak; they look their age, and will be replaced when I next pull the engine, but who knows when that will be? The performance gains can usually only be quantified on a dyno, or occasionally by the "seat-of-the-pants" meter, or perhaps by tenths of a second on the drag strip, so I wouldn't be as concerned with that as with the quality of the material and workmanship, and anecdotal longevity.

I used chrome plated Doug Thorley Tri-Y long tubes (that was before the Thorley bunch fractured and became three different entities) on all of my heavy Chevy work trucks, 400 and 454 engines, and they did improve the towing abilities and the benefits were noticeable in daily heavy use, especially on long haul highway use. Off road jobsite trail busting was also notably easier when hauling heavy trailers or loads. The chrome did discolor from the heat, but the headers never leaked or gave us a bit of trouble. I still would not hesitate to use them today.

In todays world, though, a good quality series 300 or 400 stainless material would be tops, as far as stainless goes. I like the looks of long tubes, but in some engine compartments, they are just too much of a hassle, and since real performance gains are quite ethereal in daily driver use, whatever fits, sounds like you want, and serves with a decent amount of longevity and quality would seem to me to fit the bill.

As far as wraps go, they are for the racetrack, or industrial machinery use in my book; environments where protection from personnel or environmental hazards are needed. In my experience, they promote fairly rapid deterioration of the exhaust they ere installed on, especially if there is a lot of load and heat cycling involved. I would stay away from them.

So, there will likely be as many other opinions as there are people to have them, but that is my contribution to this party. Do your homework with due diligence, and, hopefully, you'll enjoy the fruits of you labor.
 

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I have tried those solid copper and "dead soft" aluminum gaskets and I was not satisfied with them. A gasket needs to compress when tightened so it can squeeze itself around all the imperfections of the mating surfaces to prevent leaks, and this will not occur very well with anything made from solid metal.
 

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I have tried those solid copper and "dead soft" aluminum gaskets and I was not satisfied with them. A gasket needs to compress when tightened so it can squeeze itself around all the imperfections of the mating surfaces to prevent leaks, and this will not occur very well with anything made from solid metal.
did your metal gaskets leak?

i reused my metal factory gaskets on an aluminum block 4.6 modular engine when i installed long tubes and i've never had any troubles with them.
 

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Yes they did.

They were made from one solid piece of aluminum or copper, not just a mesh or fibers containing metal.
 

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gotcha! each of the gaskets i am sharing about are made of two pieces of metal and i couldn't for the life of me figure out how they were connected to one another as they never came apart from each other. the outer edges were not connected as you could clearly see the two pieces of metal that make up each gasket.
 

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I used the hairy felt gasket that came with my JBA's and 20 000 miles later not a single leak insight. Buy JBA or DT nothing else...
 

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I used the hairy felt gasket that came with my JBA's and 20 000 miles later not a single leak insight. Buy JBA or DT nothing else...
Ditto, except I have 200,000 on my JBA's.

TRD headers are also an option if your truck is '02 or older.
 
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