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It says in the manual that warming up the engine is not needed. It says to take it easy until warm and not race the engine. I've always been used to warming up the car in the morning for a couple minutes before taking off. Are there any negative effects of warming up or does it just waste gas & is not necessary?
 

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You will find that your space warms up faster when you take off 30 secs after you start the truck. And besides, cars and trucks of today have more precise fit than cars of say, the 80's and prior. Now you know you do not need a long warm up period anymore. ;)

Sanosuke!
 

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Yep, 30 seconds or so should be enough. I try to keep it under 50 mph for the first mile or until the transmission shifts into OD. It usually won't shift into overdrive until the transmission reaches a certain temp.
RE
 

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It says in the manual that warming up the engine is not needed. It says to take it easy until warm and not race the engine. I've always been used to warming up the car in the morning for a couple minutes before taking off. Are there any negative effects of warming up or does it just waste gas & is not necessary?
Its not really needed just go easy, Ive been told this since high school, I still run it for a minute or so in the driveway. The main reason is to get the oil up to temperature around 200 degrees so it can do its job, cold oil is a poor lubricant I run 0w-30 in my truck in Florida 5w-30 is just as good, but I run German Castrol a true synthetic it only comes in 0w-30 which is fine for me even though the cold is not really an issue in Florida.

This guy wrote a great paper on oil viscosity,Dr. Haas is a physician and surgeon. He graduated from the University of Florida with a degree in biochemistry with honors. He studied motor oils since high school where he did independent studies on this topic. He studied the properties of viscosity.
FerrariChat.com - FAQ: Motor Oil Articles by Dr. Ali E. Haas (AEHaas)
 

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As long as the oil pressure guage comes up, you're good to go. :tu: In fact, all idling does is waste fuel and make it take longer to warm up. :td:
 

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As long as the oil pressure guage comes up, you're good to go. :tu: In fact, all idling does is waste fuel and make it take longer to warm up. :td:
sorry, i call foul. the gauge registers "up" instantly, and if you notice it is much higher than usual since the oil is colder and harder to pump. just because the gauge registers, does not mean oil is throughout the engine instantly.
i wait 1 min in the summer before i leave after the truck has been sitting, and up to 5 but usually 3 min in the winter. thats just me.
 

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sorry, i call foul. the gauge registers "up" instantly, and if you notice it is much higher than usual since the oil is colder and harder to pump. just because the gauge registers, does not mean oil is throughout the engine instantly.
i wait 1 min in the summer before i leave after the truck has been sitting, and up to 5 but usually 3 min in the winter. thats just me.
As soon as that gauge registers, there's oil flowing throughout the system. Otherwise it wouldn't register at all, and you would hear some seriously bad noises otherwise as parts are being starved from lubrication. So, yes, as soon as that gauge starts to read, there is oil flowing throughout the system. :rolleyes:
 

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As soon as that gauge registers, there's oil flowing throughout the system. Otherwise it wouldn't register at all, and you would hear some seriously bad noises otherwise as parts are being starved from lubrication. So, yes, as soon as that gauge starts to read, there is oil flowing throughout the system. :rolleyes:
If one were to start their truck after sitting all night, and take off the oil cap, you would not see oil reach the top of the engine until at least 30-45 seconds pass by. I do not call this immediate, you can try it if you like.
I have spent much time over at bob is the oil guy website, have you?
The pump preasure is not meaured at the top of the engine. The pump is at the bottom of the system more or less. Sure it has build up on the gauge, its pumping oil, but not up to the top instantly.
I cringe at the start up and go 5 second later crew.......will it matter, probally not, but its not good i can assure you.
 

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I warm up the Tundra because it is so cold here that some interior parts can be damaged. I wait til the interior of the cab warms. The winter temperatures here can be as low as -55F. That isn't wind chill either. We are going into the summer months so it is only getting down to the 20's now at night.
 

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If one were to start their truck after sitting all night, and take off the oil cap, you would not see oil reach the top of the engine until at least 30-45 seconds pass by. I do not call this immediate, you can try it if you like.
I have spent much time over at bob is the oil guy website, have you?
The pump preasure is not meaured at the top of the engine. The pump is at the bottom of the system more or less. Sure it has build up on the gauge, its pumping oil, but not up to the top instantly.
I cringe at the start up and go 5 second later crew.......will it matter, probally not, but its not good i can assure you.
Do I spend much time on a website? Nope! In fact, I'm usually out working on engines more often than I'm looking through some website about oil. I personally have rebuilt several engines. And as soon as I've started seeing a reading on the guage, I've seen oil flowing, and yes, it was at the top of the engine. The engine that I'm referring to right there was an old pushrod engine and had the valve cover off to make sure oil was coming out of the holes in the pushrods. So, yes, I have PERSONALLY seen that once you get a reading on the guage, you get oil at the top. And not just through some website. :ts: :rolleyes:
 

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Ive rebuilt engines as well and you will see oil moving up the push rods, but its known you will have more wear on start up due to cold oil that wont flow well between bearings and to put a heavy load on these will cause even more wear, how much wear? depends on how hard its revved and type oil and condition of the oil, probably wont even matter until the end of its useful life, the end just comes sooner.

I warm it up because idling for a minute doesn't waste any gas, if you take off with a very cold motor you give it more gas just to get to move due to increased drag on the cold motor trying to pump peanut butter thats not up to temp, its telling you something when it acts sluggish like that.
 

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But when my baby has set outside at work all day in -30 degrees she is
getting started up and warmed up for a good 20 minutes to get the heat going--via Autostart:tu:
 

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They did a Myth Busters episode on this and busted it. You're just wasting gas. The cold oil is allowing the same wear on the engine componants whether the vehicle is moving or not. 50 years ago it probably helped a little but with the advancements in oils and engines there's no need to warm up a vehicle for normal use. By the time you put the vehicle in gear you should have full oil pressure to all engine componants or something is wrong in a modern vehicle.
 

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They did a Myth Busters episode on this and busted it. You're just wasting gas. The cold oil is allowing the same wear on the engine componants whether the vehicle is moving or not. 50 years ago it probably helped a little but with the advancements in oils and engines there's no need to warm up a vehicle for normal use. By the time you put the vehicle in gear you should have full oil pressure to all engine componants or something is wrong in a modern vehicle.
So they did or simulated a lifetime of cold starts and heading down the road to prove this, each time cooling the engine down and oil completely. I would like to see this show, because they're not into long term testing.
 

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I like Mythbusters, it's entertaining. I wouldn't believe everything they do as Gospel.
 

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So they did or simulated a lifetime of cold starts and heading down the road to prove this, each time cooling the engine down and oil completely. I would like to see this show, because they're not into long term testing.
Took me about three seconds on Google to find this and many other articles-

Idling: Myths Versus Reality

Do you have any references that say a modern automotive engine needs to be warmed up before being driven. I would like my trucks to last as long as possible so I'll read what you can come up with.
 

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i know on my 1993 land cruiser, and my 2001 xterra, it takes 45 seconds for oil to reach the top, its not instant. I have not tried it on the tundra, but i would bet it would be similar. it takes time for oil to pump to the top. nothing is instant with cold oil in an oil system, this is not electronics, its cold oil, no instant results. your fooling yourself in my opinion, but do what works for you.
 

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Took me about three seconds on Google to find this and many other articles-

Idling: Myths Versus Reality

Do you have any references that say a modern automotive engine needs to be warmed up before being driven. I would like my trucks to last as long as possible so I'll read what you can come up with.
that link is junk. first, you are not trying to "warm up" the engine by idling, your giving a chance for the oil to flow through the engine, so when you do take off, the oil is flowing.
a car engine idling for 5 min in the cold weather, or even hot weather may not be warmed up to opertating temp, but the oil is flowing all throughout, so when you do go, your protected.
idling for 1 min does not waster any gas. 1 min idle, drive easily until everything is up to temp.
im guessing most here think the oil is up to temp when the temp gauge for the coolant shows the engine at operating temp, right? Well, wrong. Its not.
ALso, I dont care if anyone here built engines for 50 years, doesnt mean they are right, or that they know what they are doing. Maybe they do, but maybe they dont. I know plenty of people whop are bad at what they do, but still get paid to do so.........
I'll go with my first hand testing, common sense, resrearch, and what has worked for me over the years.......
either way, at least we all agree that tundras are the vehicle to either warm up, or not warm up, that says something!
 

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i know on my 1993 land cruiser, and my 2001 xterra, it takes 45 seconds for oil to reach the top, its not instant. I have not tried it on the tundra, but i would bet it would be similar. it takes time for oil to pump to the top. nothing is instant with cold oil in an oil system, this is not electronics, its cold oil, no instant results. your fooling yourself in my opinion, but do what works for you.
The point is no matter what (idling or driving) the motor still has to be running before oil pressure and temp rise to normal. There's not a big enough difference in wear between the fast idle of a cold engine and driving it down the road at an easy pace and in the meantime you're helping it reach it's optimal pressures and temp's more efficiently.
 
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