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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my girls brother is a "professional" welder. (I use the term loosely) He agreed to assemble and install my rock sliders for me. In exchange for a case of beer (awesome, I know). So I showed him all the pieces, the mounting plates, legs, and sliders, and how they go together. I explained that the welds needed to be done right as these are designed to support the weight of the vehicle. "No problem", he says. "I've done a few others before". So, I leave, fully confident. 3 hours later, I come back and he hands me the box containing the mounting plates?? "I didnt need these", he says. He welded the legs directly to the frame! And thought it would look really nice to angle the sliders down, twice the distance I requested. And they arent centered. Then she gets ????y because I got nasty with him. Can you believe this crap?!?!?!?


Oh, yeah. I almost forgot. He didnt shorten the legs so that the sliders are fit properly under the truck. GOD HELP ME!!! At least his welds are nice.





 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Only folks like us will realize how messed up it is. the average monkey on the street wont. But now I gotta save up the $$$ to have them fixed properly. Thanks for the support tho
 

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Don't feel bad dude. I had a friend modify my N-Fab steps to fit my rig, it was his start-up welding company's first "real" job. I had a pair of steps for a '05 Tacoma DC modified to fit a '05 Tundra AC. Long story short, I had him fix the work 2x before I was satisfied. The first time I said no, he jacked up the tabs. The second time I said do it again, he wanted to weld it directly to the frame. The third time was the charm, we just chopped off the mounting brackets and I attached them to the truck, then we tacked the bar into position, detached the assembly and he fully welded the bars (then he grinded down the whole powdercoat and threw on a real nice 2 stage paint). The whole job took like 40 days. I estimated it would take a weekend. Boy was I wrong! On the other hand, I am the only Tundra AccessCab with N-Fab steps that the owner of N-Fab and I have ever seen.

I suggest you cut the bars off, fix the frame, and attach the mounting plates to the bars while holding them up to the truck as you want them positioned. Then tack a few positioning rods to the assembly and attach the whole thing to the truck with the positioning rods. Weld the mounting plates to the frame and knock off the setup rods. Then grind and paint!

If you pay the man a case of beer, you're going to get a case of beer's worth of work. I bet if you paid him $100, it'll still be cheaper than paying a real custom fabrication welder to do the job.
 

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Holy shyt dude! Man oh man I would be extra pissed. I fabbed and installed my own so I am fully aware of how they should look and be mounted. Believe me when I tell you that you absolutely MUST have those mounting plates if you ever intend to use them as a rock slider or even as a jacking point for a hi-lift. Every set I have made or seen are angled up





 

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Second thought:

Cut those off and start over. Get a sawzall and get to cutting, then grinding. Even if they were installed correctly, they are way too short. A real slider needs to be able to transition the vehicle from wheel to wheel i.e. start at the bottom of the front fender and finish at the front of the rear wheel well.

Not only are there no frame plates, there's no gussets. That's a real dangerous setup if you ever actually intend to use it
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Those are nicely done. Great job.
 

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Holy shyt dude! Man oh man I would be extra pissed. I fabbed and installed my own so I am fully aware of how they should look and be mounted. Believe me when I tell you that you absolutely MUST have those mounting plates if you ever intend to use them as a rock slider or even as a jacking point for a hi-lift. Every set I have made or seen are angled up
what kind of tires are those and what size? They look tough.
 

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Swank, I really like your design...granted I like a smooth outer rail in practice, but the bends really flow with the lines of the truck, and they're definitely a great departure from the vanilla look of the usual smooth outer rail.

Buster, I 'gree 100% with what Andy and Swank said...if you want to use those as sliders, cut those off, clean up the frame rails, cut some frame plates and have them welded on first (preferably outside of where the major crossmembers are located), then build a full-length set with the outer rail slightly higher than the main rail, put the main rail about 1/4" below the body pinch weld, and don't forget to support the tail with a brace up to the frame because the truck is a very effective tube bender :D.

Those sliders are closer to the correct length for a 1st-gen RCSB Tacoma, I suspect.

He pretty much set you up with tube steps, which is probably what he's familiar with, and what they look like given the length. If you're not going to be wheeling the truck (or only light duty), and not likely to use them as sliders, may as well make up with everyone and call it good. As tube steps, they do look good, and won't damage the frame simply by being stepped on. If you're ok with the tube step scenario, add some gussets...if not, remove and start from scratch.

-Sean

*OBTW now you know the difference between a welder and a fabricator. At least it only cost you a case of beer and some sawzall time ;). Next time, drawings and an active hand in it :lol:. It'll be fine...
 
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