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I am new to the forums and have trolled this site trying to find info on doing a tune-up on my truck. I have never been great working on cars, but over the years have done more. I have a buddy coming over to help me and it seems straight forward. I would like to read over the procedure and catch tips and tricks, like have the rubber grommet (sp?) for your socket. :unsure:

I have searched several ways, dug around on 3 separate occassions and still am having trouble find the tune up guides/spark plug replacement guides that I saw mentioned in some threads. I own a 2000 Toyota Tundra with the V8.

Since I am not a paying member I am not seeing it? I didn't think that not being a member was so restrictive. Can someone point me in the right direction please.

One thing is for sure. I now know to buy NKG plugs my truck. :happy:
 

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Before you change your plugs seafoam your truck. Being 8yrs old its probly time. Search seafoam and you will find exact procedures. This will be your biggest improvement in your trucks power and overall operation. Sorry can't really help on the plug since I have not got to them yet.:tu:
 

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There's just not a lot to a tune up. Seafoam the top end like Derek said, clean the air intake plumbing with throttle body cleaner & MAF sensor with MAF sensor cleaner,
swap the plugs for NGK or Nippondenso Irridiums & clean the PCV valve.
 

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Nothing wrong with the Seafoam advice, but I get the impression that you are asking for some basic help with your first tune-up. Sorta like your first kiss, there's a million ways to screw it up, but the odds are that you will get through it just fine.

If I recall, the Haynes manuals have a generic tune-up chapter that is excellent. Get one and read through it. You can find them at Advance Auto or Autozone, or maybe you have a friend with one.

Spark plugs, a PCV valve, and maybe the air filter if its due. Clean the throttle body and MAF sensor. Check fluid levels. Very basic tools required, but that "rubber grommet" you mentioned is found in something called a spark plug socket. Be sure to use one so you don't crack or break a brand-new spark plug.

If your friend is a decent driveway mechanic, he can be of tremendous value as you gain some confidence and avoid mistakes. If your friend just wants to drink all your beer and say things like, "I don't know, just hit it with a big hammer," you're in trouble.

People will probably chime-in with more advice about anti-seize, torque specs, $12 spark plugs, safety glasses, digital meters, and whatever. Just keep it simple, mechanically sensible, and enjoy.
 

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I would not worry about the seafoam for the top end. Plugs , Air filter, oil change,clean intake and MAF and a bottle of injector cleaner. If you have not had the tranny flushed it might be a good idea for a drain and fill. I know many people on this site love seafoam( i use it for injector cleaner). I do not see the benefit of cleaning the top end. First of all I have never seen or heard of and engine that has failed from carbon build up. Second I would rather have it stay there then run through my engine as the seafoam eats it away. Thats my dos pesos
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you Greenie! That is what I was looking for. My friend is a rather good shade tree mechanic, and has been exposed to this stuff a lot more b/c his father has always tinkered with stuff. He has replaced engines in Hondas and done brakes, worked on 4 wheelers so I feel confident he will be a great help. Plus I have helped him with computer related stuff so he is repaying the favor.

One more question. Did I read somewhere that you do NOT gap the NGK plugs and just put them in as is? My friend and I had a discussion about that, if memory serves there was fear of messing up the fine tip of those NGK plugs.

Thanks for your time.
 

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Did I read somewhere that you do NOT gap the NGK plugs and just put them in as is? My friend and I had a discussion about that, if memory serves there was fear of messing up the fine tip of those NGK plugs.
The following is copied and pasted from the NGK website:

"While it is a popular misconception that plugs are pre-gapped from the factory, the fact remains that the gap must be adjusted for the vehicle that the spark plug is intended for."

Read it for yourself at:
NGK Spark Plugs USA
 

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Here's an additional tip: Use some electrical tape and wrap it around the top of the socket and extension securing the two together. Four or five wraps should do it. This will prevent "losing" the socket down in the spark plug tube and then losing your religion.

The last time I changed mine two or three plugs were a little stubborn coming out and squeaked a little upon removal.

Next tip: If the plugs are hard to back out, a small shot (be stingy) of WD40 or your favorite penetrating oil down the spark plug tube will help. Let the stubborn plugs set while you are removing the easy ones.

Next loosen the stubborn plugs a little then tighten a little until you can get a full revolution on the plug. Once you've accomplished a full turn of the plug gently loosen until the plug frees up. Don't try to muscle them out, remember; aluminum heads. And conversely on the install.

I changed mine on a stone cold engine after it had set overnight.

Take your time, follow shall36's tutorial and you'll be OK.
 
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